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In my C++ program (on Windows), I'm allocating a block of memory and can make sure it stays locked (unswapped and contiguous) in physical memory (i.e. using VirtualAllocEx(), MapUserPhysicalPages() etc).

In the context of my process, I can get the VIRTUAL memory address of that block, but I need to find out the PHYSICAL memory address of it in order to pass it to some external device.


1. Is there any way I can translate the virtual address to the physical one within my program, in USER mode?

2. If not, I can find out this virtual to physical mapping only in KERNEL mode. I guess it means I have to write a driver to do it...? Do you know of any readily available driver/DLL/API which I can use, that my application (program) will interface with to do the translation?

3. In case I'll have to write the driver myself, how do I do this translation? which functions do I use? Is it mmGetPhysicalAddress()? How do I use it?

4. Also, if I understand correctly, mmGetPhysicalAddress() returns the physical address of a virtual base address that is in the context of the calling process. But if the calling process is the driver, and I'm using my application to call the driver for that function, I'm changing contexts and I am no longer in the context of the app when the mmGetPhysicalAddress routine is called... so how do I translate the virtual address in the application (user-mode) memory space, not the driver?

Any answers, tips and code excerpts will be much appreciated!!

Thanks

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I am curious, what could an external device do with a physical memory address? –  jyoung Dec 14 '08 at 15:54
    
Without going into details, it is an onboard device that has direct access to the machine's RAM, but is unaware of OS mappings (which is why a virtual address or using a shared memory object will not work). –  Roy Dec 14 '08 at 15:56

6 Answers 6

You can not access the page tables from user space, they are mapped in the kernel.

If you are in the kernel, you can simply inspect the value of CR3 to locate the base page table address and then begin your resolution.

This blog series has a wonderful explanation of how to do this. You do not need any OS facility/API to resolve virtual<->physical addresses.

Virtual Address: f9a10054

1: kd> .formats 0xf9a10054
Binary:  11111001 10100001 00000000 01010100

Page Directory Pointer Index(PDPI)       11                        Index into

1st table(Page Directory Pointer Table) Page Directory Index(PDI)
111001 101 Index into 2nd table(Page Directory Table) Page Table Index(PTI)
00001 0000 Index into 3rd table(Page Table) Byte Index
0000 01010100 0x054, the offset into the physical memory page

In his example, they use windbg, !dq is a physical memory read.

enter image description here

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You have a virtually continguous buffer in your application. That range of virtual memory is, as you noted, only available in the context of your application and some of it may be paged out at any time. So, in order to do access the memory from a device (which is to say, do DMA) you need to both lock it down and get a description that can be passed to a device.

You can get a description of the buffer called an MDL, or Memory Descriptor List, by sending an IOCTL (via the DeviceControl function) to your driver using METHOD_IN_DIRECT or METHOD_OUT_DIRECT. See the following page for a discussion of defining IOCTLs.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms795909.aspx

Now that you have a description of the buffer in a driver for your device, you can lock it down so that the buffer remains in memory for the entire period that your device may act on it. Look up MmProbeAndLockPages on MSDN.

Your device may or may not be able to read or write all of the memory in the buffer. The device may only support 32-bit DMA and the machine may have more than 4GB of RAM. Or you may be dealing with a machine that has an IOMMU, a GART or some other address translation technology. To accomodate this, use the various DMA APIs to get a set of logical addresses that are good for use by your device. In many cases, these logical addresses will be equivalent to the physical addresses that your question orginally asked about, but not always.

Which DMA API you use depends on whether your device can handle scatter/gather lists and such. Your driver, in its setup code, will call IoGetDmaAdapter and use some of the functions returned by it.

Typically, you'll be interested in GetScatterGatherList and PutScatterGatherList. You supply a function (ExecutionRoutine) which actually programs your hardware to do the transfer.

There's a lot of details involved. Good Luck.

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Wait, there is more. For the privilege of runnning on your customer's Vista 64 bit, you get expend more time and money to get your kernal mode driver resigned my Microsoft,

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You really shouldn't be doing stuff like this in usermode; as Christopher says, you need to lock the pages so that mm doesn't decide to page out your backing memory while a device is using it, which would end up corrupting random memory pages.

But if the calling process is the driver, and I'm using my application to call the driver for that function, I'm changing contexts and I am no longer in the context of the app when the mmGetPhysicalAddress routine is called

Drivers don't have context like user-mode apps do; if you're calling into a driver via an IOCTL or something, you are usually (but not guaranteed!) to be in the calling user thread's context. But really, this doesn't matter for what you're asking, because kernel-mode memory (anything above 0x80000000) is the same mapping no matter where you are, and you'd end up allocating memory in the kernel side. But again, write a proper driver. Use WDF (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/driver/wdf/default.mspx), and it will make writing a correct driver much easier (though still pretty tricky, Windows driver writing is not easy)

EDIT: Just thought I'd throw out a few book references to help you out, you should definitely (even if you don't pursue writing the driver) read Windows Internals by Russinovich and Solomon (http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Windows-Internals-4th-Server/dp/0735619174/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1229284688&sr=8-2); Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model is good too (http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Microsoft-Windows-Driver-Second/dp/0735618038/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1229284726&sr=1-1)

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In my C++ program (on Windows), I'm allocating a block of memory and can make sure it stays locked (unswapped and contiguous) in physical memory (i.e. using VirtualAllocEx(), MapUserPhysicalPages() etc).

No, you can't really ensure that it stays locked. What if your process crashes, or exits early? What if the user kills it? That memory will be reused for something else, and if your device is still doing DMA, that will eventually result in data loss/corruption or a bugcheck (BSOD).

Also, MapUserPhysicalPages is part of Windows AWE (Address Windowing Extensions), which is for handling more than 4 GB of RAM on 32-bit versions of Windows Server. I don't think it was intended to be used to hack up user-mode DMA.

1. Is there any way I can translate the virtual address to the physical one within my program, in USER mode?

There are drivers that let you do this, but you cannot program DMA from user mode on Windows and still have a stable and secure system. Letting a process that runs as a limited user account read/write physical memory allows that process to own the system. If this is for a one-off system or a prototype, this is probably acceptable, but if you expect other people (particularly paying customers) to use your software and your device, you should write a driver.

2. If not, I can find out this virtual to physical mapping only in KERNEL mode. I guess it means I have to write a driver to do it...?

That is the recommended way to approach this problem.

Do you know of any readily available driver/DLL/API which I can use, that my application (program) will interface with to do the translation?

You can use an MDL (Memory Descriptor List) to lock down arbitrary memory, including memory buffers owned by a user-mode process, and translate its virtual addresses into physical addresses. You can also have Windows temporarily create an MDL for the buffer passed into a call to DeviceIoControl by using METHOD_IN_DIRECT or METHOD_OUT_DIRECT.

Note that contiguous pages in the virtual address space are almost never contiguous in the physical address space. Hopefully your device is designed to handle that.

3. In case I'll have to write the driver myself, how do I do this translation? which functions do I use? Is it mmGetPhysicalAddress()? How do I use it?

There's a lot more to writing a driver than just calling a few APIs. If you're going to write a driver, I would recommend reading as much relevant material as you can from MSDN and OSR. Also, look at the examples in the Windows Driver Kit.

4. Also, if I understand correctly, mmGetPhysicalAddress() returns the physical address of a virtual base address that is in the context of the calling process. But if the calling process is the driver, and I'm using my application to call the driver for that function, I'm changing contexts and I am no longer in the context of the app when the mmGetPhysicalAddress routine is called... so how do I translate the virtual address in the application (user-mode) memory space, not the driver?

Drivers are not processes. A driver can run in the context of any process, as well as various elevated contexts (interrupt handlers and DPCs).

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1) No

2) Yes, you have to write a driver. Best would be either a virtual driver, or change the driver for the special-external device.

3) This gets very confusing here. MmGetPhysicalAddress should be the method you are locking for, but I really don't know how the physical address is mapped to the bank/chip/etc. on the physical memory.

4) You cannot use paged memory, because that gets relocated. You can lock paged memory with MmProbeAndLockPages on an MDL you can build on memory passed in from the user mode calling context. But it is better to allocate non-paged memory and hand that to your user mode application.

PVOID p = ExAllocatePoolWithTag( NonPagedPool, POOL_TAG );
PHYSICAL_ADDRESS realAddr = MmGetPhysicalAddress( p );

// use realAddr
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