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I am currently trying to restructure my program to be more OO and to better implement known patterns etc.

I have quite many nested IF-statements and want to get rid of them. How can I go about this? My first approach was to get it done with exceptions, so e.g.

public static Boolean MyMethod(String param) {
 if (param == null)
  throw new NullReferenceException("param may not be null");

 if (param.Equals("none") || param.Equals("0") || param.Equals("zero"))
  throw new ArgumentNullException("param may not be zero");

 // Do some stuff with param
 // This is not executed if param is null, as the program stops a soon
 // as one of the above exceptions is thrown
}

The method is used in the main class of the application, e.g.

static void Main() {
 try {
  Boolean test = MyClass.MyMethod(null); // Will throw an exception
 } catch (Exception ex) {
  MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error");
 }

I think this is quite nice, as it prevents the nested statements and nearly all of the methods actions are nicely arranged on one level.

As with IF-statements, the method would look like this

public Boolean MyMethod(String param) {
 if (param != null) {
  if (!param.Equals("none") && !param.Equals("0") && !param.Equals("zero")) {
   // Do some stuff with param
  } else {
   MessageBox.Show("param may not be zero", "Error");
 } else {
  MessageBox.Show("param may not be null", "Error");
 }
}

Which I find very, very ugly and hard to maintain.

Now, the question is; is this approach good? I know, that might be subjective, but how do you overcome nested IFs (1 or 2 levels are not that bad, but it gets worse after that...)

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3  
This may just be sample code, but you should really avoid throwing Exception. Use ArgumentNullException etc. –  Brian Rasmussen Sep 8 '10 at 8:55
1  
And perhaps more importantly you should not throw and then catch exceptions like that. –  Brian Rasmussen Sep 8 '10 at 8:56
    
It is sample code, I always try to throw better named exceptions for the case. And the catching does of course not ocurr in the same method, it's done on a very much higher level of the application, more or less just before they bubble up to the user. –  Florian Peschka Sep 8 '10 at 9:01
    
Okay, that makes more sense. Perhaps you could update the question to more clearly reflect this. –  Brian Rasmussen Sep 8 '10 at 9:03
    
Besides from the exceptions, I think the question is a very good one. This is all about clarifying logic and readability, a chapter often skipped. –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 8 '10 at 9:05
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6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It really depends on their purpose. In your first sample, the if statements serves the purpose of enforcing a contract, making sure that the input to the method meets certain requirements. In those cases, my own code tend to look pretty much like your code.

In the case of using the if blocks to control the flow of a method (rather than enforcing a contract), it can sometimes be a bit harder. Sometimes I come across code like the following (extremely simplified) example:

private void SomeMethod()
{
    if (someCondition == true)
    {
        DoSomething();
        if (somethingElse == true)
        {
           DoSomethingMore();
        }
    }
    else
    {
        DoSomethingElse();
    }
}

In this case, it seems as if the method has several responsibilities, so in this case I would probably choose to split it into several methods:

private void SomeMethod()
{
    if (someCondition == true)
    {
        DoItThisWay();
    }
    else
    {
        DoSomethingElse();
    }
}

private void DoItThisWay()
{
    DoSomething();
    if (somethingElse == true)
    {
       DoSomethingMore();
    }
}

This makes each method much simpler with less nested code, and may also increase the readability, if the methods are given good names.

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See my comment - the catching is not done in the same method, it was just so I didn't have to write several methods ;D –  Florian Peschka Sep 8 '10 at 9:02
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Your problem is known as the arrowhead anti-pattern.

There are pragmatic approaches, such as the Guard statements you've shown in your sample, to whole design patterns, avoiding if (and else) all together...

Lots of resources on how to solve them:

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2006/01/flattening-arrow-code.html

http://www.lostechies.com/blogs/chrismissal/archive/2009/05/27/anti-patterns-and-worst-practices-the-arrowhead-anti-pattern.aspx

http://elegantcode.com/2009/08/14/observations-on-the-if-statement/

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You way want to investigate C#4 code contracts.

A pattern often used is DDD specification pattern for abstracting out if statements, although in your case its probably not suitable.

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That's a very neat thing those contracts. I'll be looking into them. –  Florian Peschka Sep 8 '10 at 9:03
    
Specification pattern: why not use a parameter of type Func<T,bool>? –  Bent Rasmussen Dec 17 '12 at 14:05
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Maybe AspectF could help you in this case :

public Boolean MyMethod(String param) {
 try {
  AspectF.Define
   .ErrorMsgIfNull(param, "must be not null")
   .ErrorMsgIfEquals(new string[] {"None", "Zero", "0"}, "may not be zero")
   //...
   // use your own "AspectFlets" you wrote
   //...
   .Do(() =>
    {
     // Do some stuff with param
     // This is not executed if param is null, as the program stops a soon
     // as one of the above exceptions is thrown
    });
}

If you have several conditions to meet (or to avoid) that would make a ugly block of nested if, this way to factorize code may help you to make things a little bit more descriptive.

Methods in the code above are only example that does not exists, but that can be easily implemented.

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It's really quite a broad question to answer as it would really depend on the functionality of the if statements.

Certainly where possible I try and replace nested if statements with a switch instead, but this is not always possible.

Checking for parameter validity is a good approach, but look at catching it higher up in the code i.e. have the throw statements, but not the catch in the class that throws it.

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See revised question. It was lazyness, it's handled differently in the real code. –  Florian Peschka Sep 8 '10 at 9:12
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