Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class in C# say for example

public class MyComputer : PSObject
{
    public string UserName
    {
        get { return userName; }
        set { userName = value; }
    }
    private string userName;

    public string DeviceName
    {
        get { return deviceName; }
        set { deviceName = value; }
    }
    public string deviceName;
}

which is derived from PSObject. I am loading the DLL having this code in powershell using import-module. Then I tried to create a new object of the MyComputer class in PowerShell.

PS C:> $MyCompObj = New-Object MyComputer

but it throws an error saying make sure assembly containing this type is loaded. Note: I am able to call Cmdlets successfully which is present in the DLL.

I am not sure is this the right way to go ahead on creating a new object. Please correct to me make this work.

share|improve this question

First, make sure the assembly is loaded using

[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadFrom("C:\path-to\my\assembly.dll")

Next, use the fully qualified class name

$MyCompObj = New-Object My.Assembly.MyComputer
share|improve this answer

You don't need to have PSObject as base. Simply declare class without base.

Add-Type -typedef @"
public class MyComputer
{
    public string UserName
    {
        get { return _userName; }
        set { _userName = value; }
    }
    string _userName;

    public string DeviceName
    {
        get { return _deviceName; }
        set { _deviceName = value; }
    }
    string _deviceName;
}
"@

New-Object MyComputer | fl *

Later when you will work with the object, PowerShell will automatically wrap it into PsObject instance.

[3]: $a = New-Object MyComputer
[4]: $a -is [psobject]
True
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. If I am defining the class directly in PowerShell then what you said will work. But the class is inside the C# DLL, so this technique fails. – Shaj Sep 8 '10 at 10:01
1  
C# automatic properties are your friend. :-) Just be sure to set the Language parameter to CSharpVersion3. – Keith Hill Sep 8 '10 at 15:41
    
@Keith, right. I just edited Shaj's example :) – stej Sep 8 '10 at 20:09

Here is how it got working.

public class MyComputer
{
    public string UserName
    {
        get { return userName; }
        set { userName = value; }
    }
    private string userName;

    public string DeviceName
    {
        get { return deviceName; }
        set { deviceName = value; }
    }

    public string deviceName;
}

//PS C:\> $object = New-Object Namespace.ClassName
PS C:\> $object = New-Object Namespace.MyComputer
PS C:\> $object.UserName = "Shaj"
PS C:\> $object.DeviceName = "PowerShell"
share|improve this answer
    
This example doesn't work for me. It still get the errors telling me to verify that the assembly containing this type is loaded. I did verify the assembly is loaded. Any ideas? – James Dec 18 '14 at 19:35

Is the MyComputer class in a namespace? If so, you probably need to use the namespace-qualifed name of the class in the New-Object command.

Also, PowerShell does not like the public names DeviceName and deviceName which differ only in case. You probably meant to declare deviceName private. (But why not use auto-properties?)

Finally, stej is correct. There is no need to derive the MyComputer class from PSObject.

share|improve this answer
    
No luck. Tried with namespace too. Also tried after removing PSObject derivation. – Shaj Sep 8 '10 at 16:47
    
FYI: MyComputer is a class inside one namespace. – Shaj Sep 8 '10 at 16:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.