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In other words, which of the following would be faster, if any?

List<MyClass> myList;
...
...
foreach (Whatever whatever in SomeOtherLongList)
{
  ...
  if (i < myList.Count)
  {
    ...
  }
}

or

List<MyClass> myList;
...
...
int listCount = myList.Count;
foreach (Whatever whatever in SomeOtherLongList)
{
  ...
  if (i < listCount)
  {
    ...
  }
}

Thanks :)

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2  
What are you asking us for? You've already written the code both ways; if you want to know which way is faster on your machine then run them both, measure the time taken for each, and then you'll know. Anyone here is just guessing, or is giving you an answer based on what happens on their machine, neither of which gives you an answer you can rely on. There is no substitute for actual measurement when it comes to performance questions. –  Eric Lippert Sep 8 '10 at 15:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The Count is just an integer. it doesnt get calculated when you ask its value. it's 'pre-calculated' so it's the same. option 1 is more readable :)

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Never knew that. So in this case the count wouldn't be executed every time it is called in the foreach loop? –  Rob Sep 8 '10 at 10:05
    
It might have the same perf characteristics but it's not necessarily the same semantics. If myList was updated then the cached value would be stale. –  LukeH Sep 8 '10 at 10:08
    
Luke, you are right, but that wasn't really the question, it's what is best in speed. If you'll change your List in the loop, than that's a total different question :) Rob, The developers of C# would be quite dumb if they would recalculate it every time you query the value dont you think? :) When something changes in the list, the Count value gets updated. just like that :) –  Stefanvds Sep 8 '10 at 10:12
2  
@Rob: Count is executed every time it's called in the loop. It's just that the Count property only needs to return the value of an internal field, rather than performing calculations etc every time it's called. (It's also quite likely that the jitter will inline access to the Count property, improving performance further still.) –  LukeH Sep 8 '10 at 10:15

For List<T> there's really no need to cache it, as it is just a simple property.

However, the Count() extension method, that may be used on any IEnumerable can be very expensive, as it may need to enumerate the entire sequence in order to count it (for lists it just uses the property, but anything else is enumerated). Also, if you just need to know if count is not zero the Any() extension method is preferred.

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1  
usefull info about the Any() the Property versus Method is quite clear :) –  Stefanvds Sep 8 '10 at 10:17

You could take a look via Reflector to look at the implementation of Count:

public int Count
{
    get
    {
        return this._size;
    }
}

As we can see, Count is just a property returning the member _size, which is always updateted when adding/removing items to/from the list:

public void Add(T item)
{
    if (this._size == this._items.Length)
    {
        this.EnsureCapacity(this._size + 1);
    }
    this._items[this._size++] = item;
    this._version++;
}

public void RemoveAt(int index)
{
    if (index >= this._size)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }
    this._size--;
    if (index < this._size)
    {
        Array.Copy(this._items, index + 1, this._items, index, this._size - index);
    }
    this._items[this._size] = default(T);
    this._version++;
}

so there is clearly no need to cache the property.

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First one is more readable and better option, there you are not wasting the memory of int (listCount) also.

there wont be any performance difference in both.

Count in List is automatically defined one, once you create a list

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Caching explicitly will be faster b/c you save the function calls to get the count even if it is just a variable.

Since the value could change between loop iterations the compiler won't get rid of these function calls as it could change the semantics of the code.

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