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I'm trying to figure out the best design pattern to insulate a child object from knowing too much about the parent object it is contained in.

For instance, with a parent class like this...

class Airplane {
  var seats:Array
  ...

  function removeSeat(seat:Seat) {
    // find seat object in seats array and remove it
  }
}

child class...

class Seat {
  var rowNumber:int
  ...
}

If I'm working in the context of the Seat object and I want to remove myself from my parent Airplane object, what is the best way of separating the Seat from knowing about where it is in the Airplane.seats array?

I know I can pass the Airplane parent object into the constructor of the Seat, then call the removeSeat method on Airplane to remove that Seat, but I want to the Seat knowing as little about the Airplane if possible. Any ideas?

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3  
Maybe your problem is that seat can remove themselves...? –  willcodejavaforfood Sep 8 '10 at 11:20
    
Admittedly this is probably the issue. The above example is fictional, but I effectively have a Seat edit view that has a "remove seat" button on it. The view only knows now about the Seat instance, which is the cleanest programatically. It would probably be better to have the remove seat button linked to the Airplane view, since ultimately it is a function of the Airplane. In general though, I can see the UX case for both - e.g. users expect to do Seat like operations in a single view which is more intuitive, even though they have an effect at a higher context. –  supertodda Sep 8 '10 at 12:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use the event handler pattern - essentially the airplane passes a 'removeMe' callback into the Seat on construction. The Seat then executes this callback when it wants to be removed. The seat has no idea who passed in the callback - it just needs to know the signature of the callback, in this example that the first parameter is a reference to a Seat object.

E.g. in pseudo-code

class Airplane {
   // will be passed in as callback
  function removeSeat(seat) {
    array.remove(seat);
  }
  ..
  var seat = new Seat();
  seat.removeCallback = removeSeat;
  ..
 }

class Seat() {
    removeCallback = null;
    ...
    ...
    // when we want to remove the seat, run the callback if set
    if (removeCallback !== null) { 
      removeCallback(this);
    }
 }
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Try implementing a variation of the Visitor pattern.

interface SeatContainer {

    function removeSeat(seat:Seat);

}

Then your airplane implements the interface

class Airplane implements SeatContainer {
  var seats:Array
  ...

  function removeSeat(seat:Seat) {
    // find seat object in seats array and remove it
  }
}

And your seat hold a reference to the interface

class Seat {
  var container:Container
  ...
  function removeMyself() {
     container.removeSeat(this);
  }
}

This way, the Seat object ignores what kind of container is in, being isolated of the actual implementation of the SeatContainer: it could be a Car, a Cinema, a Boat, or whatever implementation of SeatContainer interface.

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That's a good solution, but just for claritie's sake, that is in no way related to the GoF Visitor pattern. –  munificent Sep 8 '10 at 17:31

In order to keep this separation, the context where you access seats should also know witch airplane they belong. Ex:

class AirplaneService {
   public function removeEmptySeats(Airplane airplane) {
      foreach seat in airplane {
         if seat is empty {
            airplane.removeSeat(seat);
         }
      }
   }

   public function removeRowSeats(Airplane airplane, int rowNumber) {
      foreach seat in airplane {
         if seat.getRowNumber() == rowNumber {
            airplane.removeSeat(seat);
         }
      }
   }
}
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