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I have a powershell script located at d:\temp

When I run this script, I want the current location of the file to be listed. How do I do this ?

For example this code would accomplish it in a dos batch file; I am trying to convert this to a powershell script..

FOR /f "usebackq tokens=*" %%a IN ('%0') DO SET this_cmds_dir=%%~dpa
CD /d "%this_cmds_dir%"
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The path of a running scripts is:

$MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path

Its directory is:

$PSScriptRoot = Split-Path $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path -Parent
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perfect. thanks! –  Santhosh Sep 8 '10 at 13:20
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Be careful using $PSSriptRoot. It that is a predefined variable within a module. –  Keith Hill Sep 8 '10 at 13:35
    
@Keith, basically I agree that it’s not a good idea to recommend $PSScriptRoot for everyone. At least it should not be used in production scripts. I have just copy/pasted this from my “personal” script. I use exactly this name because it is convenient: my code uses $PSScriptRoot everywhere: in modules (built-in) and in scripts (fake). –  Roman Kuzmin Sep 8 '10 at 14:20
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PowerShell team will finally introduce $PSScriptRoot in ordinary scripts - that is what I'm hoping for. When I discovered this variable I was really excited - thinking I could replace the $MyInvocation / Split-Path dance but nooo. :-) Folks who would also like to see this should vote: connect.microsoft.com/PowerShell/feedback/details/522951/… –  Keith Hill Sep 8 '10 at 14:32
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That happened. If you're on PowerShell 2 and using this trick, make sure you write: if(!$PSScriptRoot){ $PSScriptRoot = Split-Path $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path -Parent } so that it "just works" in PowerShell 3 –  Jaykul Feb 8 '13 at 17:07
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Roman Kuzmin answered the question imho. I'll just add that if you import a module (via Import-Module), you can access $PsScriptRoot automatic variable inside the module -- that will tell you where the module is located.

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Get-Location?

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only if you set the working directory before running the script –  Robert S Ciaccio Dec 3 '10 at 3:05
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Kevin DiTraglia Aug 20 '12 at 19:51
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