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I'm working with a function which yields some data as a std::vector<char> and another function (think of legacy APIs) which processes data and takes a const char *, size_t len. Is there any way to detach the data from the vector so that the vector can go out of scope before calling the processing function without copying the data contained in the vector (that's what I mean to imply with detaching).

Some code sketch to illustrate the scenario:

// Generates data
std::vector<char> generateSomeData();

// Legacy API function which consumes data
void processData( const char *buf, size_t len );

void f() {
  char *buf = 0;
  size_t len = 0;
  {
      std::vector<char> data = generateSomeData();
      buf = &data[0];
      len = data.size();
  }

  // How can I ensure that 'buf' points to valid data at this point, so that the following
  // line is okay, without copying the data?
  processData( buf, len );
}
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2  
Why not just keep the data vector in the function scope and call processData( &data[0], data.size() )?? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 8 '10 at 12:45
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas: In this code sketch, the scope of processData() is the direct ancestor of the scope of data. However, in real world code bases, there might dozen stack frames between the two scopes. Or imagine if processData would post the given buffer pointer and length to another thread and then return immediately - you have to ensure that the data remains valid until the consumer thread processed it. These are just two examples when you might want to decouple the lifetime of a container from the lifetime of the contained data. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 8 '10 at 13:26
    
Funny enough the answer you have accepted is exactly what I pointed in the previous comment just made more complex... instead of using a local vector and swapping with the global, just use the global... Now, that is different from what you are saying now. Transfer of ownership and lifetime management is better handled with (smart) pointers --just keep the container through a pointer and pass the ownership around... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 8 '10 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted
void f() { 
  char *buf = 0; 
  size_t len = 0; 
  std::vector<char> mybuffer; // exists if and only if there are buf and len exist
  { 
      std::vector<char> data = generateSomeData(); 
      mybuffer.swap(data);  // swap without copy
      buf = &mybuffer[0]; 
      len = mybuffer.size(); 
  } 

  // How can I ensure that 'buf' points to valid data at this point, so that the following 
  // line is okay, without copying the data? 
  processData( buf, len ); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Works great! Thanks - I didn't realize there's a swap() member function on vectors. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 8 '10 at 12:25
    
Yes, that's how it is done with std::vector. –  sharptooth Sep 8 '10 at 12:26
2  
@Frerich: STL containers generally feature a swap member, or a swap free function. It's not a requirement, it's just good design. –  Matthieu M. Sep 8 '10 at 13:31
1  
If you are going to provide a global (outer scope) vector, why not just generate the data into that container? { mybuffer = generateSomeData(); }?? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 8 '10 at 14:38
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas: The code which calls generateSomeData doesn't have direct access to the mybuffer object. If it was that easy, I wouldn't have any need to detach the data in the first place. I wrote that in my response to your comment to my question already. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 8 '10 at 14:53

The simplest solution has not even been presented yet:

void f() { 
   std::vector<char> data = generateSomeData(); 

  processData( &data[0], data.size() ); 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: This answers a question, but not the one I asked; I intentionally put a scope around the data vector so that it goes out of scope early to demonstrate my point. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 8 '10 at 14:32
    
@Frerich: but perhaps it answers the one you should have asked. –  Mike Seymour Sep 8 '10 at 14:33
    
@Mike: Feel free to answer 'Beneath the big apple tree in the garden', just in case I meant to ask 'Where can I find some shadow during hot days?'. :-} –  Frerich Raabe Sep 8 '10 at 14:34
    
@Frerich: Taking that you have accepted a solution that requires adding a vector in the outer scope, this solution is just the simple elegant version of it... why do you want to create a second vector and swap if you can place the vector in the outer scope? My take is that you did not ask what you wanted to know, and a detail in the accepted answer helped you to a solution to the question you did not post. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 8 '10 at 14:43
1  
@Frerich: The bit about communicating the data to another thread (instead of just to an outer scope) was missing from your question. My solution does indeed not work for the across-threads case. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Sep 9 '10 at 10:45

I wouldn't recommend it, but:

char* ptr = NULL;
int len = -1;
{
    vector<char> vec;
    /* ... fill vec with data ... */
    vec.push_back(NULL); // dont forget to null terminate =)
    ptr = &vec.front();
    len = vec.size();
    // here goes...
    memset((void*)&vec, 0, sizeof(vec));
}
// vec is out of scoop, but you can still access it's old content via ptr.
char firstVal = ptr[0];
char lastVal = ptr[len-1];
delete [] ptr; // don't forget to free

Voila!

This code is actually pretty safe as vec's destructor will call delete [] 0;, which is a safe operation (unless you got some strange implementation of stl).

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5  
you have a strange definition of "safe". –  jalf Sep 8 '10 at 12:28
    
I'm no language lawyer, but there's gotta be some undefined behavior there. –  Steve Fallows Sep 8 '10 at 12:30
    
-1. All decent compilers should produce a warning on the memset() line. –  Dummy00001 Sep 8 '10 at 12:32
    
@Dummy00001: Well,, they don't, it works, and its probably the only way to detach the array from the vector. –  Viktor Sehr Sep 8 '10 at 12:37
1  
Oh god... kill it with a fire! –  Alex B Sep 8 '10 at 12:51

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