Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to be able to test a class initialises correctly using Moq:

class ClassToTest
{
    public ClassToTest()
    {
        Method1(@"C:\myfile.dat")
    }

    public virtual void Method1(string filename)
    {
        // mock this method
        File.Create(filename);
    }
}

I thought I'd be able to use the CallBase property to create a testable version of the class, then use .Setup() to ensure Method1() does not execute any code.

However, creating the Mock<ClassToTest>() doesn't call the constructor, and if it did it'd be too late to do the Setup()!

If this is impossible, what is the best way round the problem whilst ensuring that the constructor behaves correctly?

EDIT: To make it clearer, I've added a parameter to Method1() to take a filename and added some behaviour. The test I'd like to write would be a working version on the following:

[Test]
public void ClassToTest_ShouldCreateFileOnInitialisation()
{
    Mock<ClassToTest> mockClass = new Mock<ClassToTest>() { CallBase = true };
    mockClass.Setup(x => x.Method1(It.IsAny<string>());

    mockClass.Verify(x => x.Method1(@"C:\myfile.dat"));
}
share|improve this question
5  
Before you go down this path, please look into your design practices. Calling a virtual method in a constructor is not recommended, as it can cause very subtle bugs which are hard to track. See stackoverflow.com/questions/448258/… for details. –  Erik van Brakel Sep 8 '10 at 12:49
    
What is it that Method1() is doing that you need to mock? –  Ian Johnson Sep 8 '10 at 12:49
    
Don't call virtual methods in constructors if you can. If you can't, can you please paste your test? –  Grzenio Sep 8 '10 at 13:49
    
I only declare the method virtual in order to mock it out later. If this is wrong then I'll have to use another method... I've added an example which may help clarify what I'm trying to do. –  g t Sep 9 '10 at 0:49
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Way down inside of Moq.Mock (actually inside the CastleProxyFactory that Moq uses)

mockClass.Object

will call the constructor by way of Activator.CreateInstance()

So your test would look something like

[Test]
public void ClassToTest_ShouldCreateFileOnInitialisation()
{
    Mock<ClassToTest> mockClass = new Mock<ClassToTest>();
    mockClass.Setup(x => x.Method1(It.IsAny<string>());

    var o = mockClass.Object;

    mockClass.Verify(x => x.Method1(@"C:\myfile.dat"));
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.