Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Whilst reviewing some Qt C++ code I came across this:

class Foo
{
  Q_OBJECT

signals:
  virtual void someSignal(const QString& str, int n)
  {
    Q_UNUSED(str);
    Q_UNUSED(n);
  }
  ...
};

Now, Qt signals cannot have a body so I'm surprised this even compiles (perhaps because the body is effectively empty). I also don't see the point of making a signal virtual as ... it can't have a body so how can it be overridden?

Am I missing something here or is this a valid code smell?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That looks smelly to me.

It's valid to declare a signal in a base class and then emit it from a derived class, e.g.

class MyBase : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
// ...
signals:
    void somethingHappened();
};

class MyDerived : public MyBase
{
    Q_OBJECT
// ...
    void doSomething();
};

void MyDerived::doSomething()
{
    // ....
    emit somethingHappened();
}

Maybe that's what the declaration in the question was meant to achieve.

share|improve this answer

Strictly C++ speaking it's normal it compiles, given signal is a macro for protected and Q_UNUSED is a cast to void. But you should get an error when running moc which precisely creates the implementation of the methods declared as signals.

share|improve this answer

Qt signals are not allowed to be (pure) virtual. See comments to this bug - https://bugreports.qt.io/browse/QTBUG-41004

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.