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I'm adding HTTPS support to code that does input and output using boost tcp::iostream (acting as an HTTP server).

I've found examples (and have a working toy HTTPS server) that do SSL input/output using boost::asio::read/boost::asio::write, but none that use iostreams and the << >> operators. How do I turn an ssl::stream into an iostream?

Working code:

#include <boost/asio.hpp> 
#include <boost/asio/ssl.hpp> 
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <iostream> 
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;
using boost::asio::ip::tcp;

typedef boost::asio::ssl::stream<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket> ssl_stream;

string HTTPReply(int nStatus, const string& strMsg)
{
    string strStatus;
    if (nStatus == 200) strStatus = "OK";
    else if (nStatus == 400) strStatus = "Bad Request";
    else if (nStatus == 404) strStatus = "Not Found";
    else if (nStatus == 500) strStatus = "Internal Server Error";
    ostringstream s;
    s << "HTTP/1.1 " << nStatus << " " << strStatus << "\r\n"
      << "Connection: close\r\n"
      << "Content-Length: " << strMsg.size() << "\r\n"
      << "Content-Type: application/json\r\n"
      << "Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2009 12:04:08 GMT\r\n"
      << "Server: json-rpc/1.0\r\n"
      << "\r\n"
      << strMsg;
    return s.str();
}

int main() 
{ 
    // Bind to loopback 127.0.0.1 so the socket can only be accessed locally                                            
    boost::asio::io_service io_service;
    tcp::endpoint endpoint(boost::asio::ip::address_v4::loopback(), 1111);
    tcp::acceptor acceptor(io_service, endpoint);

    boost::asio::ssl::context context(io_service, boost::asio::ssl::context::sslv23);
    context.set_options(
        boost::asio::ssl::context::default_workarounds
        | boost::asio::ssl::context::no_sslv2);
    context.use_certificate_chain_file("server.cert");
    context.use_private_key_file("server.pem", boost::asio::ssl::context::pem);

    for(;;)
    {
        // Accept connection                                                                                            
        ssl_stream stream(io_service, context);
        tcp::endpoint peer_endpoint;
        acceptor.accept(stream.lowest_layer(), peer_endpoint);
        boost::system::error_code ec;
        stream.handshake(boost::asio::ssl::stream_base::server, ec);

        if (!ec) {
            boost::asio::write(stream, boost::asio::buffer(HTTPReply(200, "Okely-Dokely\n")));
            // I really want to write:
            // iostream_object << HTTPReply(200, "Okely-Dokely\n") << std::flush;
        }
    }
}

It seems like the ssl::stream_service would be the answer, but that is a dead end.

Using boost::iostreams (as suggested by accepted answer) is the right approach; here's the working code I've ended up with:

#include <boost/asio.hpp> 
#include <boost/asio/ssl.hpp> 
#include <boost/iostreams/concepts.hpp>
#include <boost/iostreams/stream.hpp>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace boost::asio;

typedef ssl::stream<ip::tcp::socket> ssl_stream;


//
// IOStream device that speaks SSL but can also speak non-SSL
//
class ssl_iostream_device : public boost::iostreams::device<boost::iostreams::bidirectional> {
public:
    ssl_iostream_device(ssl_stream &_stream, bool _use_ssl ) : stream(_stream)
    {
        use_ssl = _use_ssl;
        need_handshake = _use_ssl;
    }

    void handshake(ssl::stream_base::handshake_type role)
    {
        if (!need_handshake) return;
        need_handshake = false;
        stream.handshake(role);
    }
    std::streamsize read(char* s, std::streamsize n)
    {
        handshake(ssl::stream_base::server); // HTTPS servers read first
        if (use_ssl) return stream.read_some(boost::asio::buffer(s, n));
        return stream.next_layer().read_some(boost::asio::buffer(s, n));
    }
    std::streamsize write(const char* s, std::streamsize n)
    {
        handshake(ssl::stream_base::client); // HTTPS clients write first
        if (use_ssl) return boost::asio::write(stream, boost::asio::buffer(s, n));
        return boost::asio::write(stream.next_layer(), boost::asio::buffer(s, n));
    }

private:
    bool need_handshake;
    bool use_ssl;
    ssl_stream& stream;
};

std::string HTTPReply(int nStatus, const std::string& strMsg)
{
    std::string strStatus;
    if (nStatus == 200) strStatus = "OK";
    else if (nStatus == 400) strStatus = "Bad Request";
    else if (nStatus == 404) strStatus = "Not Found";
    else if (nStatus == 500) strStatus = "Internal Server Error";
    std::ostringstream s;
    s << "HTTP/1.1 " << nStatus << " " << strStatus << "\r\n"
      << "Connection: close\r\n"
      << "Content-Length: " << strMsg.size() << "\r\n"
      << "Content-Type: application/json\r\n"
      << "Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2009 12:04:08 GMT\r\n"
      << "Server: json-rpc/1.0\r\n"
      << "\r\n"
      << strMsg;
    return s.str();
}


void handle_request(std::iostream& s)
{
    s << HTTPReply(200, "Okely-Dokely\n") << std::flush;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{ 
    bool use_ssl = (argc <= 1);

    // Bind to loopback 127.0.0.1 so the socket can only be accessed locally                                            
    io_service io_service;
    ip::tcp::endpoint endpoint(ip::address_v4::loopback(), 1111);
    ip::tcp::acceptor acceptor(io_service, endpoint);

    ssl::context context(io_service, ssl::context::sslv23);
    context.set_options(
        ssl::context::default_workarounds
        | ssl::context::no_sslv2);
    context.use_certificate_chain_file("server.cert");
    context.use_private_key_file("server.pem", ssl::context::pem);

    for(;;)
    {
        ip::tcp::endpoint peer_endpoint;
        ssl_stream _ssl_stream(io_service, context);
        ssl_iostream_device d(_ssl_stream, use_ssl);
        boost::iostreams::stream<ssl_iostream_device> ssl_iostream(d);

        // Accept connection                                                                                            
        acceptor.accept(_ssl_stream.lowest_layer(), peer_endpoint);
        std::string method;
        std::string path;
        ssl_iostream >> method >> path;

        handle_request(ssl_iostream);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
why do you want to use an iostream if the synchronous read and write methods already work? –  Sam Miller Sep 8 '10 at 19:21
    
Because I'm adding HTTPS support to code that already speaks HTTP using iostreams, and I want to minimize the amount of code I change. –  gavinandresen Sep 8 '10 at 19:40
    
It'd probably be more useful for you to show us the code that is NOT working. –  joshperry Sep 11 '10 at 19:44
1  
The issue is not getting code to work-- it is integrating cleanly into existing code without completely rewriting it. The 'real' code is: github.com/gavinandresen/bitcoin-git/blob/master/rpc.cpp#L1280 –  gavinandresen Sep 11 '10 at 20:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+50

@Guy's suggestion (using boost::asio::streambuf) should work, and it's probably the easiest to implement. The main drawback to that approach is that everything you write to the iostream will be buffered in memory until the end, when the call to boost::asio::write() will dump the entire contents of the buffer onto the ssl stream at once. (I should note that this kind of buffering can actually be desirable in many cases, and in your case it probably makes no difference at all since you've said it's a low-volume application).

If this is just a "one-off" I would probably implement it using @Guy's approach.

That being said -- there are a number of good reasons that you might rather have a solution that allows you to use iostream calls to write directly into your ssl_stream. If you find that this is the case, then you'll need to build your own wrapper class that extends std::streambuf, overriding overflow(), and sync() (and maybe others depending on your needs).

Fortunately, boost::iostreams provides a relatively easy way to do this without having to mess around with the std classes directly. You just build your own class that implements the appropriate Device contract. In this case that's Sink, and the boost::iostreams::sink class is provided as a convenient way to get most of the way there. Once you have a new Sink class that encapsulates the process of writing to your underlying ssl_stream, all you have to do is create a boost::iostreams::stream that is templated to your new device type, and off you go.

It will look something like the following (this example is adapted from here, see also this related stackoverflow post):

//---this should be considered to be "pseudo-code", 
//---it has not been tested, and probably won't even compile
//---

#include <boost/iostreams/concepts.hpp>
// other includes omitted for brevity ...

typedef boost::asio::ssl::stream<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket> ssl_stream;

class ssl_iostream_sink : public sink {
public:
    ssl_iostream_sink( ssl_stream *theStream )
    {
        stream = theStream;
    }

    std::streamsize write(const char* s, std::streamsize n)
    {
        // Write up to n characters to the underlying 
        // data sink into the buffer s, returning the 
        // number of characters written

        boost::asio::write(*stream, boost::asio::buffer(s, n));
    }
private:
    ssl_stream *stream;
};

Now, your accept loop might change to look something like this:

for(;;)
{
    // Accept connection                                                                                            
    ssl_stream stream(io_service, context);
    tcp::endpoint peer_endpoint;
    acceptor.accept(stream.lowest_layer(), peer_endpoint);
    boost::system::error_code ec;
    stream.handshake(boost::asio::ssl::stream_base::server, ec);


    if (!ec) {

        // wrap the ssl stream with iostream
        ssl_iostream_sink my_sink(&stream);
        boost::iostream::stream<ssl_iostream_sink> iostream_object(my_sink);

        // Now it works the way you want...
        iostream_object << HTTPReply(200, "Okely-Dokely\n") << std::flush;
    }
}

That approach hooks the ssl stream into the iostream framework. So now you should be able to do anything to iostream_object in the above example, that you would normally do with any other std::ostream (like stdout). And the stuff that you write to it will get written into the ssl_stream behind the scenes. Iostreams has built-in buffering, so some degree of buffering will take place internally -- but this is a good thing -- it will buffer until it has accumulated some reasonable amount of data, then it will dump it on the ssl stream, and go back to buffering. The final std::flush, should force it to empty the buffer out to the ssl_stream.

If you need more control over internal buffering (or any other advanced stuff), have a look at the other cool stuff available in boost::iostreams. Specifically, you might start by looking at stream_buffer.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer

I think what you want to do is use stream buffers (asio::streambuf)

Then you can do something like (untested code written on the fly follows):

boost::asio::streambuf msg;
std::ostream msg_stream(&msg);
msg_stream << "hello world";
msg_stream.flush();
boost::asio::write(stream, msg);

Similarly your read/receive side can read into a stream buffer in conjunction with std::istream so you can process your input using various stream functions/operators.

Asio reference for streambuf

Another note is I think you should check out the asio tutorials/examples. Once you do you'll probably want to change your code to work asynchronously rather than the synchronous example you're showing above.

share|improve this answer
    
I might end up doing that if I can't get an ssl-enabled-iostream working. RE asynchronous: no, the server already runs in a separate thread and doesn't have to handle even tens of connections per minute, so running synchronously is better. –  gavinandresen Sep 11 '10 at 20:19
    
You can also try basic_socket_iostream but I don't think it works with SSL (it does with tcp, ip::tcp::iostream). You might be able to adapt your ssl stream to work with it though. –  Guy Sirton Sep 11 '10 at 21:48

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