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I have data in following format.

Table 1

e_id   e_name  e_type 
-------------------------
1      CBC     2
2      ABC     3
3      N2      1
4      CBC1    3
5      ABC1    3
6      N1      1

Table 2

N_ID   N_Name
---------------
3      N2
6      N1

Table 3

N_ID  E_ID
------------
3     1
3     2
3     3
6     4
6     5
6     6

And I want to build a hierarchy as follows.

e_id    e_name     e_type   n_id
------------------------------------
6       N1           1        6
4        - ABC1      3        6
5        - CBC1      3        6
3       N2           1        3
4        - ABC       3        3
5        - CBC       2        3

With Order by Nodes (ascending), child nodes (ascending).

I tried doing something similar to this,

SELECT u.e_id, 
CASE WHEN e_TYPE_ID = 1 THEN  u.e_name ELSE ' - ' + u.e_name END e_name, 
e_TYPE_ID, su.n_ID  
FROM table1 u
INNER JOIN table3 su on u.e_id = su.e_id 
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT N_ID FROM table2 WHERE N_ID = CASE WHEN u.e_TYPE_ID = 1 THEN u.e_id ELSE n_ID END)
ORDER BY  e_TYPE_ID, u.e_name,n_id

But I am not able to get the correct order, is there a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
The hierarchy is always two levels (i.e., Parent-Child, never Grandparent-Parent-Child)? –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 8 '10 at 16:34
    
i didn't get you? mine is also two level (N1 -parent, ABC, CBC - child) –  rs. Sep 8 '10 at 16:43
    
Then you don't need no CTE. :) You need to go kill that DBA from another department. –  Denis Valeev Sep 8 '10 at 16:47

3 Answers 3

Use:

WITH summary AS (
  SELECT a.e_id,
         a.e_name,
         a.e_type,
         b.n_id,
         CASE WHEN e_type = 1 THEN e_type ELSE 2 END AS rank
    FROM TABLE1 a
    JOIN TABLE3 b ON b.e_id = a.e_id)
   SELECT s.e_id,
          CASE 
            WHEN s.rank > 1 THEN ' - '+ s.e_name 
            ELSE s.e_name 
          END AS e_name,
          s.e_type,
          s.n_id
     FROM summary s
 ORDER BY s.n_id DESC, s.rank, s.e_name

I tested using:

WITH table2 AS (
   SELECT 3 AS n_id, 'N2' AS n_name
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 6, 'N1'),
     table1 AS (
   SELECT 1 AS e_id, 'CBC' AS e_name, 2 AS e_type
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 2, 'ABC', 3
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 3, 'N2', 1
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 4, 'CBC1', 3
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 5, 'ABC1', 3
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 6, 'N1', 1),
     table3 AS (
   SELECT 3 AS n_id, 1 AS e_id
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 3, 2
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 3, 3
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 6, 4
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 6, 5
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 6, 6),
     summary AS (
   SELECT a.e_id,
          a.e_name,
          a.e_type,
          b.n_id,
          CASE WHEN e_type = 1 THEN e_type ELSE 2 END AS rank
     FROM TABLE1 a
     JOIN TABLE3 b ON b.e_id = a.e_id)
  SELECT s.e_id,
         CASE 
            WHEN s.rank > 1 THEN ' - '+ s.e_name 
            ELSE s.e_name 
         END AS e_name,
         s.e_type,
         s.n_id
    FROM summary s
ORDER BY s.n_id DESC, s.rank, s.e_name
share|improve this answer
    
@Joe Stefanelli: New, and improved. –  OMG Ponies Sep 8 '10 at 18:23
    
I'm a tough grader so I'm still only giving partial credit. :-) It is only by coincidence that your ORDER BY s.n_id DESC... gets N1 to appear before N2. Swap N1 and N2 in Table1, so that N1 is e_id 3 and N2 is e_id 6 and N2 will sort before N1. –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 8 '10 at 18:41
    
@Joe Stefanelli: I demand a recount? =) –  OMG Ponies Sep 8 '10 at 18:46
    
LOL. If it's any consolation, I'm still pulling my hair out thinking about this one. It seems like it should be simple and yet it's eluding me so far. –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 8 '10 at 18:54

If you're using SQL Server 2008 (or 2008 R2), I would suggest using Hierarchy IDs as shown in Model Your Data Hierarchies With SQL Server 2008.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think this is overkill in this particular case. –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 8 '10 at 16:35
    
In general, it's hard to know if something is "overkill" or not until you have some knowledge about the usage patterns, performance characteristics, etc. There are plenty of success stories using the hierarchy ID concept. IMHO, even if the case is simple, if it's the Right Way(tm) to do something, that's almost always how it should be done. I stand by my original suggestion. –  David Moye Sep 8 '10 at 18:02
    
Nice article - very interesting. –  Sam Sep 9 '10 at 0:22

I will set you on the right path, you will need a CTE (common table expression) to accomplish this task:

;with EH as 
(
select 1 level, * from Table1 t1 where e_type = 1
union all
select level+1, * from EH 
join Table3 t3 on eh.e_id = t3.e_id 
join Table3 t32 on t3.n_id = t32.n_id and t3.e_id

--FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1111

[Update]

Why do you need those spaghetti tables anyway? Why don't you keep everything in one or two tables?

share|improve this answer
    
I know i too don't like the way it is designed, we are using tables from other department database. –  rs. Sep 8 '10 at 16:38

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