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Well, I'm trying to build a small python prgram with a SocketServer that is supposed to send messages it receives to all connected clients. I'm stuck, I don't know how to store clients on the serverside, and I don't know how to send to multiple clients. Oh and, my program fails everytime more then 1 client connects, and everytime a client sends more then one message...

Here's my code until now:

        print str(self.client_address[0])+' connected.'
    def handle(self):
        new=1
        for client in clients:
            if client==self.request:
                new=0
        if new==1:
            clients.append(self.request)
        for client in clients:
            data=self.request.recv(1024)
            client.send(data)

class Host:
    def __init__(self):
        self.address = ('localhost', 0)
        self.server = SocketServer.TCPServer(self.address, EchoRequestHandler)
        ip, port = self.server.server_address
        self.t = threading.Thread(target=self.server.serve_forever)
        self.t.setDaemon(True)
        self.t.start()
        print ''
        print 'Hosted with IP: '+ip+' and port: '+str(port)+'. Clients can now connect.'
        print ''
    def close(self):
        self.server.socket.close()

class Client:
    name=''
    ip=''
    port=0
    def __init__(self,ip,port,name):
        self.name=name
        self.hostIp=ip
        self.hostPort=port
        self.s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        self.s.connect((self.hostIp, self.hostPort))
    def reco(self):
        self.s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        self.s.connect((self.hostIp, self.hostPort))
    def nick(self,newName):
        self.name=newName
    def send(self,message):
        message=self.name+' : '+message
        len_sent=self.s.send(message)
        response=self.s.recv(len_sent)
        print response
        self.reco()
    def close(self):
        self.s.close()

Obviously I have no idea what I'm doing, so any help would be great.
Thanks in advance!

Edit: I'm using Python 2.7 on Windows Vista.

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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You want to look at asyncore here. The socket operations you're calling on the client side are blocking (don't return until some data is received or a timeout occurs) which makes it hard to listen for messages sent from the host and let the client instances enqueue data to send at the same time. asyncore is supposed to abstract the timeout-based polling loop away from you.

Here's a code "sample" -- let me know if anything is unclear:

from __future__ import print_function

import asyncore
import collections
import logging
import socket


MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH = 1024


class RemoteClient(asyncore.dispatcher):

    """Wraps a remote client socket."""

    def __init__(self, host, socket, address):
        asyncore.dispatcher.__init__(self, socket)
        self.host = host
        self.outbox = collections.deque()

    def say(self, message):
        self.outbox.append(message)

    def handle_read(self):
        client_message = self.recv(MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH)
        self.host.broadcast(client_message)

    def handle_write(self):
        if not self.outbox:
            return
        message = self.outbox.popleft()
        if len(message) > MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH:
            raise ValueError('Message too long')
        self.send(message)


class Host(asyncore.dispatcher):

    log = logging.getLogger('Host')

    def __init__(self, address=('localhost', 0)):
        asyncore.dispatcher.__init__(self)
        self.create_socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        self.bind(address)
        self.listen(1)
        self.remote_clients = []

    def handle_accept(self):
        socket, addr = self.accept() # For the remote client.
        self.log.info('Accepted client at %s', addr)
        self.remote_clients.append(RemoteClient(self, socket, addr))

    def handle_read(self):
        self.log.info('Received message: %s', self.read())

    def broadcast(self, message):
        self.log.info('Broadcasting message: %s', message)
        for remote_client in self.remote_clients:
            remote_client.say(message)


class Client(asyncore.dispatcher):

    def __init__(self, host_address, name):
        asyncore.dispatcher.__init__(self)
        self.log = logging.getLogger('Client (%7s)' % name)
        self.create_socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        self.name = name
        self.log.info('Connecting to host at %s', host_address)
        self.connect(host_address)
        self.outbox = collections.deque()

    def say(self, message):
        self.outbox.append(message)
        self.log.info('Enqueued message: %s', message)

    def handle_write(self):
        if not self.outbox:
            return
        message = self.outbox.popleft()
        if len(message) > MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH:
            raise ValueError('Message too long')
        self.send(message)

    def handle_read(self):
        message = self.recv(MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH)
        self.log.info('Received message: %s', message)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    logging.basicConfig(level=logging.INFO)
    logging.info('Creating host')
    host = Host()
    logging.info('Creating clients')
    alice = Client(host.getsockname(), 'Alice')
    bob = Client(host.getsockname(), 'Bob')
    alice.say('Hello, everybody!')
    logging.info('Looping')
    asyncore.loop()

Which results in the following output:

INFO:root:Creating host
INFO:root:Creating clients
INFO:Client (  Alice):Connecting to host at ('127.0.0.1', 51117)
INFO:Client (    Bob):Connecting to host at ('127.0.0.1', 51117)
INFO:Client (  Alice):Enqueued message: Hello, everybody!
INFO:root:Looping
INFO:Host:Accepted client at ('127.0.0.1', 55628)
INFO:Host:Accepted client at ('127.0.0.1', 55629)
INFO:Host:Broadcasting message: Hello, everybody!
INFO:Client (  Alice):Received message: Hello, everybody!
INFO:Client (    Bob):Received message: Hello, everybody!
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Thanks, looks like what I was looking for! Unfortunately, I didn't manage to make it work outside main: I added asyncore.loop() at the end of Host.__init__(), and my host object accepts client connections, but It doesn't react to sent messages... –  Alex Sep 9 '10 at 8:06
    
@Alex: asyncore.loop() runs forever! Effectively by calling it you're saying, "I'm done controlling the program, hand things over to the asyncore loop so it can handle send/receives for the rest of the time." Notice how I set everything up before calling asyncore.loop(). What are you trying to do by moving it? –  cdleary Sep 9 '10 at 9:30
    
Well, I don't want to run just some definite connections, but have the host running, and clients being able to connect/send messages at any time. Thanks for your time! –  Alex Sep 9 '10 at 11:11
    
@Alex: If you run multiple Python interpreter instances you can do this easily. Main will still run asyncore.loop() (that's what makes the dispatchers actually do things), but you can break the program up into a host.py and a client.py, where you pass the client the address of the host through sys.argv. –  cdleary Sep 9 '10 at 17:38
    
A more complete solution might try to guarantee that complete messages are always sent and received, instead of enforcing a small message size and hoping that messages fit into the network buffer etc. –  John Wiseman Sep 19 '12 at 22:09
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why use SocketServer? a simple client doesn't meet your needs?

import socket

HOST = ''
PORT = 8000
sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
sock.bind((HOST, PORT))
sock.listen(5)
while True:
    conn, addr = sock.accept()
    print 'connecting to', addr
    while True:
        data = conn.recv(1024)
        if not data:
            break
        conn.send(data)
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5  
won't this block other clients from connecting? –  Codler Dec 5 '10 at 23:39
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To take multiple clients simultaneously you will have to add SocketServer.ForkingMixIn or ThreadingMixIn

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