Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Since 29 bit integers are popular in AMF, I would like to incorporate the fastest / best routine known. Two routines currently exist in our library and can be tested live on ideone http://ideone.com/KNmYT
Here is the source for quick reference

public static int readMediumInt(ByteBuffer in) {
    ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
    buf.put((byte) 0x00);
    buf.put(in.get());
    buf.put(in.get());
    buf.put(in.get());
    buf.flip();
    return buf.getInt();
}

public static int readMediumInt2(ByteBuffer in) { byte[] bytes = new byte[3]; in.get(bytes); int val = 0; val += bytes[0] * 256 * 256; val += bytes[1] * 256; val += bytes[2]; if (val < 0) { val += 256; } return val; }

share|improve this question
    
Is it supposed to be small or big endian? –  NullUserException Sep 8 '10 at 17:08
    
Big endian order –  Mondain Sep 8 '10 at 17:19
3  
These methods read fixed-length 24-bit integers. That's not the same as an AMF 29-bit variable-length integer in any of its forms. Are you sure this is what you want to do? –  Tom Anderson Sep 8 '10 at 17:45
    
I'm fairly certain these methods were meant to read 29 bit integers, but I am not an expert on the AMF code specifics. We do notice odd deserializations and maybe thats due to the 24 vs 29 bit. –  Mondain Sep 8 '10 at 19:00
    
I was wrong, this method is used to get the 24-bit AMF timestamp. ugh sorry about the confusion. –  Mondain Sep 9 '10 at 16:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Usually I'd do this with bit operations. The second version might eventually get optimized to something close to this by the JVM, but one can't be sure. Now, this is only 24 bits, following your samples, but the question says "29 bit integer". I'm not sure which you really wanted.

public static int readMediumInt(ByteBuffer buf) {
  return ((buf.get() & 0xFF) << 16) 
       | ((buf.get() & 0xFF) <<  8)
       | ((buf.get() & 0xFF);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This surely has to beat any version which involves allocation. –  Tom Anderson Sep 8 '10 at 17:46
    
On most JVMs, I agree getting rid of allocation is the biggest win. But if I understand correctly, some of the newest JVM versions support escape analysis. If a non-primitive value doesn't "escape" from the stack, they can allocate and de-allocate it very efficiently (its effectively stack allocation). –  erickson Sep 8 '10 at 18:13
    
This would appear to be the fastest and it is in fact 24 bit that we need here. –  Mondain Sep 9 '10 at 16:43
    
One minor optimization here; use a byte[3] to do a bulk-get of the 3 bytes and then AND/SHIFT them to get the result. I do need to reiterate, this is a MINOR optimization :) –  Riyad Kalla Aug 15 '13 at 18:02
    
@RiyadKalla As discussed in the comments above, allocating a new array with each call could cancel out any gains from the bulk read (or worse). However, if you made this into an instance method, and reused a byte array associated with the instance, you could have a safe, efficient version. –  erickson Aug 16 '13 at 5:21

If you do actually want to read AMF 29-bit integers, this should do the job (assuming i've understood the format correctly):

private static int readMediumInt(ByteBuffer buf) {
    int b0, b1, b2;
    if ((b0 = buf.get()) >= 0) return b0;
    if ((b1 = buf.get()) >= 0) return ((b0 << 7) & ((~(-1 << 7)) << 7)) | b1;
    if ((b2 = buf.get()) >= 0) return ((b0 << 14) & ((~(-1 << 7)) << 14)) | ((b1 << 7) & ((~(-1 << 7)) << 7)) | b2;
    return ((b0 << 22) & ((~(-1 << 7)) << 22)) | ((b1 << 15) & ((~(-1 << 7)) << 15)) | ((b2 << 8) & ((~(-1 << 7)) << 8)) | (buf.get() & 0xff);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Might want to stick a few more 7s in there, though. And some brackets. –  Tom Anderson Sep 8 '10 at 18:06
    
Wow, that is quite a block of code; I'll add it to my unit tests. –  Mondain Sep 8 '10 at 19:06

The most important change is to avoid allocating objects within the method. By the way your micro benchmark didn't reset "start", so the second result includes the time used for the first method. Also, you need to run micro benchmarks multiple times, otherwise the just in time compiler has no chance to run. I suggest to use a method similar to

public static int readMediumInt3(ByteBuffer buf) {
    return ((buf.get() & 0xff) << 16) + 
            ((buf.get() & 0xff) << 8) + 
            ((buf.get() & 0xff));
}

The complete code is:

import java.nio.ByteBuffer;

public class Main {

    public static int readMediumInt(ByteBuffer in) {
        ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
        buf.put((byte) 0x00);
        buf.put(in.get());
        buf.put(in.get());
        buf.put(in.get());
        buf.flip();
        return buf.getInt();
    }

    public static int readMediumInt2(ByteBuffer in) {
        byte[] bytes = new byte[3];
        in.get(bytes);
        int val = 0;
        val += bytes[0] * 256 * 256;
        val += bytes[1] * 256;
        val += bytes[2];
        if (val < 0) {
            val += 256;
        }
        return val;
    }

    public static int readMediumInt3(ByteBuffer buf) {
        return ((buf.get() & 0xff) << 16) + 
                ((buf.get() & 0xff) << 8) + 
                ((buf.get() & 0xff));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Main m = new Main();
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            // version 1
            ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
            buf.putInt(424242);
            buf.flip();
            long start;
            start = System.nanoTime();
            for (int j = 0; j < 10000000; j++) {
                buf.position(0);
                readMediumInt(buf);
            }
            start = System.nanoTime() - start;
            System.out.printf("Ver 1: elapsed: %d ms\n", start / 1000000);

            // version 2
            ByteBuffer buf2 = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
            buf2.putInt(424242);
            buf2.flip();
            start = System.nanoTime();
            for (int j = 0; j < 10000000; j++) {
                buf2.position(0);
                readMediumInt2(buf2);
            }
            start = System.nanoTime() - start;
            System.out.printf("Ver 2: elapsed: %d ms\n", start / 1000000);

            // version 3
            ByteBuffer buf3 = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
            buf3.putInt(424242);
            buf3.flip();
            start = System.nanoTime();
            for (int j = 0; j < 10000000; j++) {
                buf3.position(0);
                readMediumInt3(buf3);
            }
            start = System.nanoTime() - start;
            System.out.printf("Ver 3: elapsed: %d ms\n", start / 1000000);
        }

    }
}

My results:

  • Ver 1: elapsed: 556 ms
  • Ver 2: elapsed: 187 ms
  • Ver 3: elapsed: 3 ms
share|improve this answer
    
Nice catch on my not resetting the "start", I honestly didn't even pay attention to the times. :) –  Mondain Sep 8 '10 at 19:04
    
I agree with you conclusion, however do you really think you performed 10 million operations each taking 556 ms. (Thats about 2 months) I suggest your timings would be in ns since your nanoTime() are in nano-seconds if you divided by 10 million instead of 1 million (i.e. you performed it 10 million times) Finally, your last loop to an average of 0.3 nano-seconds or about 1 clock cycle. It is highly likely your JVM realised this loop doesn't do anything and optimised it to nothing. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 14 '10 at 20:55
    
It's not 556 ms "each". Did I say "each"? You maybe right, possibly the operation is optimized away. To ensure the method is fully executed, it's better to add some dummy operation such as sum += readMediumIntX in each case. –  Thomas Mueller Sep 15 '10 at 4:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.