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Are there good reasons why it's a better practice to have only one return statement in a function?

Or is it okay to return from a function as soon as it is logically correct to do so, meaning there may be many return statements in the function?

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12  
I don't agree that the question is language agnostic. With some languages, having multiple returns is more natural and convenient than with others. I'd be more likely to complain about early returns in a C function than in a C++ one that uses RAII. –  Adrian McCarthy Jan 15 '13 at 17:24
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48 Answers

It doesn't make sense to always require a single return type. I think it is more of a flag that something may need to be simplified. Sometimes it's necessary to have multiple returns, but often you can keep things simpler by at least trying to have a single exit point.

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Having multiple exit points is essentially the same thing as using a GOTO. Whether or not that's a bad thing depends on how you feel about raptors.

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15  
I disagree with you that multiple returns are the same as gotos. Unfortunately you don't give any reasons for your view. The rest of your post is just guilt by association. –  Anthony Jun 27 '10 at 17:14
8  
A while loop is also "essentially the same thing as a goto" - that doesn't mean that it has the same drawbacks. –  Anthony Jun 27 '10 at 17:22
3  
"essentially the same thing as using a GOTO" - a very very very inaccurate opinion. Why not say that "Using switch-case is the same thing as using a bunch of GOTOs" - you know, break; GOTO End; –  Blessed Geek Sep 6 '10 at 21:19
2  
Isn't a function call the same thing as using a GOTO? BAD programmer. –  ErikE Apr 22 '11 at 9:29
1  
@ErikE: No, a function call is the same as using a GOSUB which is a structured programming concept. GOTO is not. –  Adrian McCarthy Jan 15 '13 at 17:40
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You already implicitly have multiple implicit return statements, caused by error handling, so deal with it.

As is typical with programming, though, there are examples both for and against the multiple return practice. If it makes the code clearer, do it one way or the other. Use of many control structures can help (the case statement, for example).

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The only important question is "How is the code simpler, better readable, easier to understand?" If it is simpler with multiple returns, then use them.

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Unfortunately, "understandability" is in the eye of the beholder. –  Steve Emmerson Dec 12 '09 at 20:36
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Well, maybe I'm one of the few people here old enough to remember one of the big reasons why "only one return statement" was pushed so hard. It's so the compiler can emit more efficient code. For each function call, the compiler typically pushes some registers on the stack to preserve their values. This way, the function can use those registers for temporary storage. When the function returns, those saved registers have to be popped off the stack and back into the registers. That's one POP (or MOV -(SP),Rn) instruction per register. If you have a bunch of return statements, then either each one has to pop all the registers (which makes the compiled code bigger) or the compiler has to keep track of which registers might have been modified and only pop those (decreasing code size, but increasing compilation time).

One reason why it still makes sense today to try to stick with one return statement is ease of automated refactoring. If your IDE supports method-extraction refactoring (selecting a range of lines and turning them into a method), it's very difficult to do this if the lines you want to extract have a return statement in them, especially if you're returning a value.

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If it's okay to write down just an opinion, that's mine:

I totally and absolutely disagree with the `Single return statement theory' and find it mostly speculative and even destructive regarding the code readability, logic and descriptive aspects.

That habit of having one-single-return is even poor for bare procedural programming not to mention more high-level abstractions (functional, combinatory etc.). And furthermore, I wish all the code written in that style to go through some special rewriting parser to make it have multiple return statements!

A function (if it's really a function/query according to `Query-Command separation' note - see Eiffel programming lang. for example) just MUST define as many return points as the control flow scenarios it has. It is much more clear and mathematically consistent; and it is the way to write functions (i.e. Queries)

But I would not be so militant for the mutation messages that your agent does receive - the procedure calls.

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I use multiple exit points for having error-case + handling + return value as close in proximity as possible.

So having to test for conditions a, b, c that have to be true and you need to handle each of them differently:

if (a is false) {
    handle this situation (eg. report, log, message, etc.)
    return some-err-code
}
if (b is false) {
    handle this situation
    return other-err-code
}
if (c is false) {
    handle this situation
    return yet-another-err-code
}

perform any action assured that a, b and c are ok.

The a, b and c might be different things, like a is input parameter check, b is pointer check to newly allocated memory and c is check for a value in 'a' parameter.

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1  
The pattern above is not for any branching logic. It is to assure that when you reach the point to start serious processing all your parameters are checked and ok - and that if something fails you will know exactly at which point. –  Marcin Gil Mar 21 '09 at 18:21
1  
+1 I tend to do this structure a lot, i.e. to let the program test the conditions/prequisites first and return immediately. This can also be done with exception handling, asserts and code contracts if the language supports those things. –  Spoike Mar 6 '10 at 7:54
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In the interests of good standards and industry best practises, we must establish the correct number of return statements to appear in all functions. Obviously there is consensus against having one return statement. So I propose we set it at two.

I would appreciate it if everyone would look through their code right now, locate any functions with only one exit point, and add another one. It doesn't matter where.

The result of this change will undoubtedly be fewer bugs, greater readability and unimaginable wealth falling from the sky onto our heads.

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I prefer a single return statement. One reason which has not yet been pointed out is that some refactoring tools work better for single points of exit, e.g. Eclipse JDT extract/inline method.

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You should never use a return statement in a method.

I know I will be jumped on for this, but I am serious.

Return statements are basically a hangover from the procedural programming days. They are a form of goto, along with break, continue, if, switch/case, while, for, yield and some other statements and the equivalents in most modern programming languages.

Return statements effectively 'GOTO' the point where the function was called, assigning a variable in that scope.

Return statements are what I call a 'Convenient Nightmare'. They seem to get things done quickly, but cause massive maintenance headaches down the line.

Return statements are diametrically opposed to Encapsulation

This is the most important and fundamental concept of object oriented programming. It is the raison d'etre of OOP.

Whenever you return anything from a method, you are basically 'leaking' state information from the object. It doesn't matter if your state has changed or not, nor whether this information comes from other objects - it makes no difference to the caller. What this does is allow an object's behaviour to be outside of the object - breaking encapsulation. It allows the caller to start manipulating the object in ways that lead to fragile designs.

LoD is your friend

I recommend any developer to read about the Law of Demeter (LoD) on c2.com or Wikipedia. LoD is a design philosophy that has been used at places that have real 'mission-critical' software constraints in the literal sense, like the JPL. It has been shown to reduce the amount of bugs in code and improve flexibility.

There has an excellent analogy based on walking a dog. When you walk a dog, you do not physically grab hold of its legs and move them such that the dog walks. You command the dog to walk and it takes care of it's own legs. A return statement in this analogy is equivalent to the dog letting you grab hold of its legs.

Only talk to your immediate friends:

  1. arguments of the function you are in,
  2. your own attributes,
  3. any objects you created within the function

You will notice that none of these require a return statement. You might think the constructor is a return, and you are on to something. Actually the return is from the memory allocator. The constructor just sets what is in the memory. This is OK so long as the encapsulation of that new object is OK, because, as you made it, you have full control over it - no-one else can break it.

Accessing attributes of other objects is right out. Getters are out (but you knew they were bad already, right?). Setters are OK, but it is better to use constructors. Inheritance is bad - when you inherit from another class, any changes in that class can and probably will break you. Type sniffing is bad (Yes - LoD implies that Java/C++ style type based dispatch is incorrect - asking about type, even implicitly, is breaking encapsulation. Type is an implicit attribute of an object. Interfaces are The Right Thing).

So why is this all a problem? Well, unless your universe is very different from mine, you spend a lot of time debugging code. You aren't writing code that you plan never to reuse. Your software requirements are changing, and that causes internal API/interface changes. Every time you have used a return statement you have introduced a very tricky dependency - methods returning anything are required to know about how whatever they return is going to be used - that is each and every case! As soon as the interface changes, on one end or the other, everything can break, and you are faced with a lengthy and tedious bug hunt.

They really are an malignant cancer in your code, because once you start using them, they promote further use elsewhere (which is why you can often find returning method-chains amongst object systems).

So what is the alternative?

Tell, don't ask.

With OOP - the goal is to tell other objects what to do, and let them take care of it. So you have to forget the procedural ways of doing things. It's easy really - just never write return statements. There are much better ways of doing the same things:

There is nothing wrong with the return concept, but return statements are deeply flawed.

If you really need an answer back - use a call back. Pass in a data structure to be filled in, even. That way you keep the interfaces clean and open to change, and your whole system is less fragile and more adaptable. It does not slow your system down, in fact it can speed it up, in the same way as tail call optimisation does - except in this case, there is no tail call so you don't even have to waste time manipulating the stack with return values.

If you follow these arguments, you will find there really is never a need for a return statement.

If you follow these practices, I guarantee that pretty soon you will find that you are spending a lot less time hunting bugs, are adapting to requirement changes much more quickly, and having less problems understanding your own code.

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7  
What is really the difference between returning a value and filling in a data structure that was passed in? The latter just models the former, in an uglier way. And have you read much about functional programming? –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 24 '08 at 9:13
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Wow, this is just exactly the opposite of how I usually operate. Call it "purely impure" or "side-effect required" programming. –  Chris Conway Mar 26 '09 at 4:54
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I don't think I've ever read a post on here that was thought out and disagreed with it so thoroughly. The setnewrecord approach above by Trevel is cleaner and easier than the COM signature, and in many cases can lead to the avoidance of temporary variables to store values. Which is cleaner. –  Steve Apr 9 '09 at 12:36
3  
cont. Could you provide some example of how they break oop? The way I see it, if its a parameter or a return, you're getting the same thing out in the end. Unless you use generics, one way is just as brittle as the other. –  Steve Apr 9 '09 at 12:38
4  
The above post is codswallop. –  Anthony Jul 15 '10 at 9:12
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I always avoid multiple return statements. Even in small functions. Small functions can become larger, and tracking the multiple return paths makes it harder (to my small mind) to keep track of what is going on. A single return also makes debugging easier. I've seen people post that the only alternative to multiple return statements is a messy arrow of nested IF statements 10 levels deep. While I certain agree that such coding does occur, it isn't the only option. I wouldn't make the choice between a multiple return statements and a nest of IFs, I'd refactor it so you'd eliminate both. And that is how I code. The following code eliminates both issues and, in my mind, is very easy to read:

    public string GetResult()
    {
        string rv = null;
        bool okay = false;

        okay = PerformTest(1);

        if (okay)
        {
            okay = PerformTest(2);
        }

        if (okay)
        {
            okay = PerformTest(3);
        }

        if (okay)
        {
            okay = PerformTest(4);
        };

        if (okay)
        {
            okay = PerformTest(5);
        }

        if (okay)
        {
            rv = "All Tests Passed";
        }

        return rv;
    }
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Adding a flag to code is, from an analytical standpoint, equivalent to having two copies of the code--one were the flag is assumed to be false and one where it is assumed to true--and jumping between them every time the flag is changed. Adding flags may sometimes make code less bulky, but it does not reduce the analytical complexity. Note that in cases like the above example, adding a flag will yield an executable that is larger and slower than could be obtained without. –  supercat Apr 18 '11 at 0:05
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Why not okay = PerformTestOne() && PerformTest2() && PerformTest3() ... IIRC, '&&' will short-circuit on the first of these to return false, so even if the tests are expensive, you aren't going to perform all of them. –  Michael Blackburn Aug 5 '11 at 17:05
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I'm usually in favor of multiple return statements. They are easiest to read.

There are situations where it isn't good. Sometimes returning from a function can be very complicated. I recall one case where all functions had to link into multiple different libraries. One library expected return values to be error/status codes and others didn't. Having a single return statement can save time there.

I'm surprised that no one mentioned goto. Goto is not the bane of programming that everyone would have you believe. If you must have just a single return in each function, put it at the end and use gotos to jump to that return statement as needed. Definitely avoid flags and arrow programming which are both ugly and run slowly.

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I'm probably going to be hated for this, but ideally there should be no return statement at all I think, a function should just return its last expression, and should in the completely ideal case contain only one.

So not

function name(arg) {
    if (arg.failure?)
        return;

    //code for non failure
}

But rather

function name(arg) {
    if (arg.failure?)
        voidConstant
    else {
        //code for non failure


}

If-statements that aren't expressions and return statements are a very dubious practise to me.

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There are times when it is necessary for performance reasons (I don't want to fetch a different cache line kind of the same need as a continue; sometimes).

If you allocate resources (memory, file descriptors, locks, etc.) without using RAII then muliple returns can be error prone and are certainly duplicative as the releases need to be done manually multiple times and you must keep careful track.

In the example:

function()
{
    HRESULT error = S_OK;

    if(SUCCEEDED(Operation1()))
    {
        if(SUCCEEDED(Operation2()))
        {
            if(SUCCEEDED(Operation3()))
            {
                if(SUCCEEDED(Operation4()))
                {
                }
                else
                {
                    error = OPERATION4FAILED;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                error = OPERATION3FAILED;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            error = OPERATION2FAILED;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        error = OPERATION1FAILED;
    }

    return error;
}

I would have written it as:

function() {
    HRESULT error = OPERATION1FAILED;//assume failure
    if(SUCCEEDED(Operation1())) {

        error = OPERATION2FAILED;//assume failure
        if(SUCCEEDED(Operation3())) {

            error = OPERATION3FAILED;//assume failure
            if(SUCCEEDED(Operation3())) {

                error = OPERATION4FAILED; //assume failure
                if(SUCCEEDED(Operation4())) {

                    error = S_OK;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return error;
}

Which certainly seems better.

This tends to be especially helpful in the manual resource release case as where and which releases are necessary is pretty straightforward. As in the following example:

function() {
        HRESULT error = OPERATION1FAILED;//assume failure
        if(SUCCEEDED(Operation1())) {

            //allocate resource for op2;
            char* const p2 = new char[1024];
            error = OPERATION2FAILED;//assume failure
            if(SUCCEEDED(Operation2(p2))) {

                //allocate resource for op3;
                char* const p3 = new char[1024];
                error = OPERATION3FAILED;//assume failure
                if(SUCCEEDED(Operation3(p3))) {

                    error = OPERATION4FAILED; //assume failure
                    if(SUCCEEDED(Operation4(p2,p3))) {

                        error = S_OK;
                    }
                }
                //free resource for op3;
                delete [] p3;
            }
            //free resource for op2;
            delete [] p2;
        }
        return error;
    }

If you write this code without RAII (forgetting the issue of exceptions!) with multiple exits then the deletes have to be written multiple times. If you write it with }else{ then it gets a little ugly.

But RAII makes the multiple exit resource issue mute.

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As an alternative to the nested IFs, there's a way to use do/while(false) to break out anywhere:

    function()
    {
        HRESULT error = S_OK;

        do
        {
            if(!SUCCEEDED(Operation1()))
            {
                error = OPERATION1FAILED;
                break;
            }

            if(!SUCCEEDED(Operation2()))
            {
                error = OPERATION2FAILED;
                break;
            }

            if(!SUCCEEDED(Operation3()))
            {
                error = OPERATION3FAILED;
                break;
            }
            if(!SUCCEEDED(Operation4()))
            {
                error = OPERATION4FAILED;
                break;
            }
        } while (false);

        return error;
    }

That gets you one exit point, lets you have other nesting of operations, but still not a real deep structure. If you don't like the !SUCCEEDED you could always do FAILED whatever. This kind of thing also lets you add other code between any two other checks without having to re-indent anything.

If you were really crazy, that whole if block could be macroized too. :D

    #define BREAKIFFAILED(x,y) if (!SUCCEEDED((x))) { error = (Y); break; }

    do
    {
        BREAKIFFAILED(Operation1(), OPERATION1FAILED)
        BREAKIFFAILED(Operation2(), OPERATION2FAILED)
        BREAKIFFAILED(Operation3(), OPERATION3FAILED)
        BREAKIFFAILED(Operation4(), OPERATION4FAILED)
    } while (false);
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1  
and it litters the code with loop constructs that are not really loops - succinct and confusing for the same price ;-) –  Steven A. Lowe Oct 21 '08 at 19:02
3  
How is using goto (masking gotos is all your fake loop does) better than multiple exit points? –  mghie Jun 23 '09 at 6:00
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I think in different situations different method is better. For example, if you should process the return value before return, you should have one point of exit. But in other situations, it is more comfortable to use several returns.

One note. If you should process the return value before return in several situations, but not in all, the best solutions (IMHO) to define a method like ProcessVal and call it before return:

var retVal = new RetVal();

if(!someCondition)
    return ProcessVal(retVal);

if(!anotherCondition)
   return retVal;
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One might argue... if you have multiple conditions that must be satisfied before the tasks of the function are to be performed, then don't invoke the function until those conditions are met:

Instead of:

function doStuff(foo) {
    if (foo != null) return;
}

Or

function doStuff(foo) {
    if (foo !== null) {
        ...
    }
}

Don't invoke doStuff until foo != null

if(foo != null) doStuff(foo);

Which, requires that every call site ensures that the conditions for the invocation are satisfied before the call. If there are multiple call sites, this logic is perhaps best placed in a separate function, in a method of the to-be-invoked function (assuming they are first-class citizens), or in a proxy.

On the topic of whether or not the function is mathematically provable, consider the logic over the syntax. If a function has multiple return points, this doesn't mean (by default) that it is not mathematically provable.

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Multiple exit is good if you manage it well

The first step is to specify the reasons of exit. Mine is usually something like this:
1. No need to execute the function
2. Error is found
3. Early completion
4. Normal completion
I suppose you can group "1. No need to execute the function" into "3. Early completion" (a very early completion if you will).

The second step is to let the world outside the function know the reason of exit. The pseudo-code looks something like this:

function foo (input, output, exit_status)

  exit_status == UNDEFINED
  if (check_the_need_to_execute == false) then
    exit_status = NO_NEED_TO_EXECUTE  // reason #1 
    exit

  useful_work

  if (error_is_found == true) then
    exit_status = ERROR               // reason #2
    exit
  if (need_to_go_further == false) then
    exit_status = EARLY_COMPLETION    // reason #3
    exit

  more_work

  if (error_is_found == true) then
    exit_status = ERROR
  else
    exit_status = NORMAL_COMPLETION   // reason #4

end function

Obviously, if it's beneficial to move a lump of work in the illustration above into a separate function, you should do so.

If you want to, you can be more specific with the exit status, say, with several error codes and early completion codes to pinpoint the reason (or even the location) of exit.

Even if you force this function into one that has only a single exit, I think you still need to specify exit status anyway. The caller needs to know whether it's OK to use the output, and it helps maintenance.

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