Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class MyClass<T>
{
        public T this[int index]
        {
            get
            {
                ...
            }
            set
            {
                ...
            }
        }

        public void MyMethod<T>()
        {   
             int middleIndex = ...;              
             T value = this[middleIndex ];     
             ...             
        }           
}

The code won't compile because of the statement in MyMethod(). Is there another way of calling the indexer ?

Edit: Modified MyMethod()

Edit2: Compilation error

Error    6    Cannot implicitly convert type 'T [C:\MyClass.cs]' to 'T [C:\MyClass.cs]'

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Where is index defined in MyMethod? –  Larsenal Sep 8 '10 at 18:48
1  
If I replace MyMethod with "public void MyMethod(int index)" the example compiles perfectly fine. –  Albin Sunnanbo Sep 8 '10 at 18:49
    
The code you posted looks fine. Can you post more of MyMethod? –  Larsenal Sep 8 '10 at 18:49
3  
And is this unwillingness to compile expressed in some kind of compile time error, computer crashing, apples falling from the sky that you would like to share or maybe you expect us reading your mind? –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 8 '10 at 18:50
3  
Are you sure you have only that T in your class ? Isn't, by any chance,T another class or MyMethod generic as well ?(like MyMethod<T>) –  digEmAll Sep 8 '10 at 19:08

5 Answers 5

Works fine for me:

public class MyClass<T>
{
    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return default(T);
        }
        set
        {
        }
    }

    public void MyMethod(int index)
    {                 
         T value = this[index];     
    }           
}

Admittedly I had to introduce the index parameter into MyMethod, but I'm assuming you were wanting to get the index from somewhere... if that's not what you meant, please clarify.

share|improve this answer

This works fine for me:

public class MyClass<T>
{
    List<T> _items = new List<T>();

    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return _items[index];
        }
    }

    public void MyMethod()
    {
        T value = this[2];
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Calling the indexer is fine, but it doesn't know which index you want. If you make index a parameter of MyMethod it will work fine.

If you're trying to get the current index or something then you need to store a private variable, wire it up in your indexer and access that.

Your edited code compiles fine...

public class MyClass<T>
{
        public T this[int index]
        {
            get
            {
                ...
            }
            set
            {
                ...
            }
        }

        public void MyMethod()
        {   
             int middleIndex = ...;              
             T value = this[middleIndex ];     
             ...             
        }           
}
share|improve this answer

you're not passing in a value for the index into the method MyMethod - can you post a little more code? It looks like something is missing...

share|improve this answer

Your offending code is here:

public void MyMethod<T>()

Your class MyClass<T> already has a generic type parameter T, so the generic <T> on MyMethod is unnecessary

share|improve this answer
    
It is offending because you're declaring a new T, and it has no relation to the outer T. –  Simon Svensson Sep 9 '10 at 14:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.