Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am working on a legacy app that is being extended to run in a multi-tenant configuration. The basic architecture takes the old application and adds a StoreID column to every table. Each tenant then sees the legacy tables through a set of views that filter on store id, something like:

create view AcmeBatWings.data as 
select * from dbo.data d where d.StoreId = 99

It is a bit fancier than that, but this simplifies the question.

Now, I can create a trigger like this

create trigger tr_Tenant_fluff on AcmeBatWings
instead of insert
as
insert into AcmeBatWings (Name, StoreId)
select i.Name, 99 from inserted i

Assuming a simple table with Name and StoreId columns.

My problem is that I have 100+ tables and if I was going to follow this pattern I would have to make a specialized trigger for each table listing all the fields for each of them. Not only is that annoying in the short term is is a maintenance nightmare since any table changes would need to include trigger modifications.

So, how could a write a trigger that just says on every insert or update set the StoreId field to 99 for any table with a StoreId?

Thanks for helping a SQL newbie out!

share|improve this question
    
You mention that the system is multi-tenant; were you planning on hard-coding a value of '99' for all your triggers, or would the StoreId depend on who is using the system? Also, what version of SQL Server? –  LittleBobbyTables Sep 8 '10 at 20:59
    
Are you saying that you have different views for each tenant referring to the same base table and the only difference is that they have a different id filter? –  Martin Smith Sep 8 '10 at 20:59
    
the view and trigger are not aligned in your example. In the view, AcmeBatWings is a schema name. In the trigger, it's an object name. Which is it? A schema name, I assume. It makes a big difference. –  Peter Radocchia Sep 9 '10 at 1:45
    
@Martin Smith - That is the ticket. It is the third model discussed in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa479086.aspx –  Ukko Sep 9 '10 at 2:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

So it appears you are using multiple schemas to convey the store information while keeping object names consistent, w/ one schema per store, yes? And some sort of connection/user magic so that queries are hitting the right views.

If so, I present two egregious hacks and one recommended solution (so you know your options).

Egregious hack #1, assumes the store views include all columns from the base table except StoreId, in the same ordinal position as the base table, and no other columns:

CREATE TRIGGER tr_Tenant_fluff ON AcmeBatWings.data
INSTEAD OF INSERT 
AS BEGIN 
  DECLARE @StoreId INT

  SELECT @StoreId = StoreId FROM dbo.StoreSchemas 
  WHERE StoreSchema = OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(@@PROCID)

  INSERT dbo.data SELECT *, @StoreId FROM inserted
END

If you ever add a column to the base table, you would have to update all store views to include the column, or the triggers will break.

Egregious hack #2, assumes the same as (1), except that StoreId is included in the store views:

CREATE TRIGGER tr_Tenant_fluff ON AcmeBatWings.data
INSTEAD OF INSERT 
AS BEGIN 
  DECLARE @StoreId INT

  SELECT @StoreId = StoreId FROM dbo.StoreSchemas 
  WHERE StoreSchema = OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(@@PROCID)

  SELECT * INTO #inserted FROM inserted
  UPDATE #inserted SET StoreId = @StoreId

  INSERT dbo.data SELECT * FROM #inserted
END

The benefits of hack #2 over hack #1 is that you can define your store views with SELECT *, and if the base tables change, you simply recompile all store views with sp_refreshview. The downside is that you are copying inserted data from one intermediary table to another, and updating the second table. This is has tripled the overhead of your INSTEAD OF INSERT trigger, which was already fairly expensive to begin with. ie,

  • base overhead of INSTEAD OF INSERT trigger -> cost to populate inserted -> x.
  • cost to populate #inserted from inserted -> about x.
  • cost to update #inserted -> about x
  • total overhead of egregious hack #2: about 3x

So otherwise, the best thing to do is script the triggers out. It's a fairly straight-forward process, once you are familiar the system tables, and you can tweak the trigger generation anyway you see fit. For that matter, you should be scripting out the store views as well.

To get you started:

CREATE TABLE dbo.data (Name VARCHAR(10), StoreId INT)
GO
CREATE SCHEMA StoreA
GO
CREATE SCHEMA StoreB
GO
CREATE SCHEMA StoreC
GO
CREATE VIEW StoreA.data AS SELECT Name FROM dbo.data WHERE StoreId = 1
GO
CREATE VIEW StoreB.data AS SELECT Name FROM dbo.data WHERE StoreId = 2
GO
CREATE VIEW StoreC.data AS SELECT Name FROM dbo.data WHERE StoreId = 3
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.StoreSchemas (StoreSchema SYSNAME UNIQUE, StoreId INT PRIMARY KEY)
GO
INSERT dbo.StoreSchemas VALUES ('StoreA', 1), ('StoreB', 2), ('StoreC', 3)
GO

DECLARE @crlf NCHAR(2) = NCHAR(13)+NCHAR(10)
SELECT
  N'CREATE TRIGGER tr_Tenent_fluff ON '+schema_name(v.schema_id)+N'.data'+@crlf
+ N'INSTEAD OF INSERT'+@crlf
+ N'AS BEGIN'+@crlf
+ N'  INSERT dbo.data ('
+ STUFF((
    SELECT @crlf+N'  , '+name FROM sys.columns tc 
    WHERE tc.object_id = t.object_id
      AND (tc.name IN (SELECT name FROM sys.columns vc WHERE vc.object_id = v.object_id)
        OR tc.name = N'StoreId')
    ORDER BY tc.column_id
    FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE).value('.','NVARCHAR(MAX)')
    ,5,1,N' ')+@crlf
+ N'  )'+@crlf
+ N'  SELECT'
+ STUFF((
    SELECT @crlf+N'  , '+name
      + CASE WHEN name = N'StoreId' THEN ' = '+(
          SELECT CONVERT(NVARCHAR,StoreId) FROM dbo.StoreSchemas s 
          WHERE s.StoreSchema = SCHEMA_NAME(v.schema_id)
          )
        ELSE '' END
    FROM sys.columns tc 
    WHERE tc.object_id = t.object_id
      AND (tc.name IN (SELECT name FROM sys.columns vc WHERE vc.object_id = v.object_id)
        OR tc.name = N'StoreId')
    ORDER BY tc.column_id
    FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE).value('.','NVARCHAR(MAX)')
    ,5,1,N' ')+@crlf
+ N'  FROM inserted'+@crlf
+ N'END'+@crlf
+ N'GO'+@crlf
FROM sys.tables t 
JOIN sys.views v 
  ON t.name = v.name 
 AND t.schema_id = SCHEMA_ID('dbo') 
 AND v.schema_id <> t.schema_id
WHERE t.name = 'data'
GO
share|improve this answer
    
Oooo, I like the scripting part. I am off to bed right now but I will give this a closer look in the morning. –  Ukko Sep 9 '10 at 2:43
    
This was the ticket! Thanks! –  Ukko Sep 9 '10 at 17:17

So, if I've got this right, each store has its own ID. The DB is deployed to each store and the DB should record a different StoreId based on where it has been deployed with minimal code effort. Here's what I propose. Create a table in the database to hold the StoreId. Create a function to retrieve that StoreId. Then create the StoreId column in each table as a computed column that uses the function. So, on each deployment, the only change is to update the StoreId in one table. Something like:

/* This table is updated with the unique value for each individual store */
create table MyStore (
    StoreId int
)

insert into MyStore
    (StoreId)
    values
    (99)        
go

/* This function will be used in the computed column of each table */
create function dbo.LookupStoreId()
returns int
as
begin
    return (select StoreId from MyStore)
end
go

create table AcmeBatWings (
    Name char(10),
    StoreId as dbo.LookupStoreId()
) 

insert into AcmeBatWings
    (Name)
    values
    ('abcde')

select Name, StoreId from AcmeBatWings
go

/* Clean up after demo */
drop table AcmeBatWings
drop table MyStore
drop function dbo.LookupStoreId
go
share|improve this answer

Instead of using triggers, why not update each table by making StoreId NOT NULL, and giving it a default value of 99?

Edit based on clarifications

You could try an AFTER INSERT, UPDATE trigger as an alternative to an INSTEAD OF trigger

create trigger tr_Tenant_fluff on AcmeBatWings
AFTER insert, update
as

-- You'll need to get @StoreID here somehow

update AcmeBatWings 
set StoreID = @StoreID
where [Name] IN (SELECT [Name] FROM inserted) -- update based on primary key

While this updates the data you just inserted or updated, it does have the benefit of not breaking when you add or remove columns from the tables.

share|improve this answer
    
@Martin Smith - That's kind of what I wondered, but the example used a hard-coded '99', so that is what confused me. –  LittleBobbyTables Sep 8 '10 at 20:58
    
Yes I deleted that comment as I wasn't really sure myself. –  Martin Smith Sep 8 '10 at 21:00
    
Wouldn't the store id be tied to the view, not the base table? In which case defaulting the column in the base table would not solve the problem. –  Peter Radocchia Sep 9 '10 at 1:40
    
@Peter - You are correct, that was a misunderstanding on my part –  LittleBobbyTables Sep 9 '10 at 2:46
    
to combine your solutions: make StoreId in the base table not null and default to -1. Then, in the AFTER trigger, update -1 to @StoreId, no join required. I'd want to test for concurrent inserts by different clients, but I believe the trigger will serialize them. I don't think this would be much worse than an INSTEAD OF INSERT trigger, and it would only need to be after insert, not insert and update. –  Peter Radocchia Sep 9 '10 at 3:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.