Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I've been doing this for as long as I can remember, but I'm curious if this is really what I should be doing. You write a function that takes a parameter, so you anticipate it to have a value, but if it doesn't, you have a good reason to default it, to say zero. What I currently do is write a helper function:

function foo() { return foo(0); };
function foo(bar) { ... };

I just ran across an instance where I did this and I looked at it oddly for a few seconds before understanding my logic behind it. I come from php where it's trivial:

function foo(bar=0) { ... }

Is there a javascript alternative that I'm not aware of?

share|improve this question
    
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/148901/… –  BGerrissen Sep 8 '10 at 21:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can't have overloaded functions in JavaScript. Instead, use object based initialization, or check for the values and assign a default if none supplied.

In your example, the second function foo(bar) will replace the first one.

Here's a function using object initialization.

function foo(config) {
    extend(this, config);
}

where extend is a function that merges the config object with the current object. It is similar to the $.extend method in jQuery, or $extend method of MooTools.

Invoke the function and pass it named key value pairs

foo({ bar: 0 });

The other way to initialize is to look at the supplied values, and assign a default if the value is not given

function foo(bar) {
    bar = bar || 0;
}

This works as long as bar is not a falsy value. So foo(false) or foo("") will still initialize bar to 0. For such cases, do an explicit check.

function foo(bar) {
    bar = (typeof bar == 'undefined' ? 0 : bar);
}
share|improve this answer

In JavaScript, the argument will be undefined if the user didn't pass it in. You can use the || operator to set the value of the argument if it's undefined:

function foo(bar) {
  bar = bar || 0;
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
5  
you had better check for bar === undefined instead of doing this simple test. –  jrharshath Sep 8 '10 at 21:43
    
@jrharshath I just figure out variable===undefined is wrong just because undefined is actually a undefined variable, not a reserved word. So If you previously assign undefined=true; and then test alert(x===undefined) //returns false So you should type check using typeof variable===undefined –  Vitim.us May 15 '12 at 20:31
1  
This answer is wrong, because you can't pass 0 nor false nor null. Exemple: If bar is true by default like this bar = bar || true you can't pass false, bar will be always true. –  Vitim.us May 15 '12 at 20:39
1  
@Vitim.us undefined was fixed ECMAScript 5, See 15.1.1.3, released 2009 implementation chart, look for Immutable undefined The answer by Annie is wrong because of the reasons you gave above (0,false,null). –  some Mar 20 '13 at 2:53
1  
@some +1 for ECMAScript5 and up to date information –  Vitim.us Mar 20 '13 at 6:10

The simplest way I know of is test for a value and then set it to a default value if no value is found. I have not come across a catch all one liner yet, this is the best i have got.

If expecting a string value use this. Default will trigger on these values: [ undefined, null, "" ]

function foo(str) {
  str = !!str  ? str  : 'bar';
  ...
}

If expecting a number or Boolean value. This allows 0 and false as values. Default will trigger on [ undefined, null, {}, functions ]

Handy for making values arguments that only accept primitive values like number, boolean and string

function foo(val) {
  val= !!val == val || val*1 ? val : 10;
  ...
}

If you're looking to test for objects such as {}, There is documentation on doing this but it isn't so simple.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.