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This one should be pretty simple. I am making a non-MVC ASP.NET 2.0 site. VS2008 seems to generate controls with a <script> area -- I want the code in a codebehind, so I've manually hooked that up.

I have the following:

widget.ascx:

<%@ Control Language="C#" ClassName="widget" Codebehind="widget.ascx.cs" Inherits="widget"%>

<asp:Label ID="Label1" runat="server" Text="Label"></asp:Label>

widget.ascx.cs:

namespace webapp
{
  public partial class widget : System.Web.UI.Control
  {
    protected void Page_Load(object sender)
    {
        Label1.Text = Session["user_id"].ToString();
    }
  }
}

I copy and pasted this stuff from ASPX pages that use codebehind files, but when I try to compile I get errors that Label1 does not exist in this context.

All help in the matter appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

does that match the declaration of your other pages / controls?

try using codebeside instead of codebehind / better to look it at declarations in other project files.

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Yes, that matches the other declarations. I've tried several other permutations and they haven't worked either. :( I've tried codebeside too to no luck. –  cookiecaper Sep 9 '10 at 2:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, I must have created the control the wrong way. I started over with a fresh template and it all worked as expected. If you are experiencing this problem, just copy your code out and try to ask Visual Studio to generate the files from the user control templates again. Make sure you right-click on project name and add a new file.

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To understand what's going on here, it's important to note that the markup file (.ascx) inherits from, and has access to the non-private fields of, the code-behind file (.ascx.cs). Not the other way around: you cannot reference objects defined only in the markup file from your code-behind. In your example, this would have also been solved by placing the following in your widget.ascx.cs file:

protected Label Label1;

But, what! When you had Visual Studio re-do the control, you probably don't see any such line in your .ascx.cs file. Visual Studio manages and maintains a second code-behind file, the .ascx.designer.cs file. The partial in public partial class widget signals that the code for the control is allowed to be defined in multiple files. You manage the .ascx.cs file, and Visual Studio manages the .ascx.designer.cs. As you add, remove, and rename controls from the markup file, Visual Studio should be adding, removing, and renaming the associated base-class fields in the designer code-behind file. If you deleted, edited, or excluded this file, then it's possible that Label1 could have been inaccessible.

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