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What is the difference between require_relative and require in Ruby?

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Before 1.9.2 there was no need for require_relative, because current directory of script was in $:. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2900370 –  Nakilon Sep 9 '10 at 20:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 119 down vote accepted

Just look at the docs:

require_relative complements the builtin method require by allowing you to load a file that is relative to the file containing the require_relative statement.

For example, if you have unit test classes in the "test" directory, and data for them under the test "test/data" directory, then you might use a line like this in a test case:

require_relative "data/customer_data_1"
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52  
The answer links to the docs, what more would you want? –  cbmanica Dec 28 '12 at 19:23
1  
Is there a difference between require './file.rb' and require_relative 'file.rb'? –  Ciro Santilli Oct 25 at 17:31
2  
@CiroSantilli Yes. require_relative allows you to "load a file that is relative to the file containing the require_relative statement". With require, ./ indicates a path that is relative to your current working directory. –  Ajedi32 Nov 14 at 15:58

From Ruby API:

require_relative complements the builtin method require by allowing you to load a file that is relative to the file containing the require_relative statement.

When you use require to load a file, you are usually accessing functionality that has been properly installed, and made accessible, in your system. require does not offer a good solution for loading files within the project’s code. This may be useful during a development phase, for accessing test data, or even for accessing files that are "locked" away inside a project, not intended for outside use.

For example, if you have unit test classes in the "test" directory, and data for them under the test "test/data" directory, then you might use a line like this in a test case:

require_relative "data/customer_data_1" 

Since neither "test" nor "test/data" are likely to be in Ruby’s library path (and for good reason), a normal require won’t find them. require_relative is a good solution for this particular problem.

You may include or omit the extension (.rb or .so) of the file you are loading.

path must respond to to_str.

You can find the documentation at http://extensions.rubyforge.org/rdoc/classes/Kernel.html

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require_relative is a convenient subset of require:

require_relative('path')

equals:

require(File.expand_path('path', File.dirname(__FILE__)))

if __FILE__ is defined, or it raises LoadError otherwise.

This implies that:

  • require_relative 'a' and require_relative './a' require relative to the current file (__FILE__).

    This is what you want to use when requiring inside your library, since you don't want the result to depend on the current directory of the caller.

  • eval('require_relative("a.rb")') raises LoadError because __FILE__ is not defined inside eval.

    This is why you can't use require_relative in RSpec tests, which get evaled.

The following operations are only possible with require:

  • require './a.rb' requires relative to the current directory

  • require 'a.rb' uses the search path ($LOAD_PATH) to require. It does not find files relative to current directory or path.

    This is not possible with require_relative because the docs say that path search only happens when "the filename does not resolve to an absolute path" (i.e. starts with / or ./ or ../), which is always the case for File.expand_path.

The following operation is possible with both, but you will want to use require as it is shorter and more efficient:

  • require '/a.rb' and require_relative '/a.rb' both require the absolute path.

When the docs are not clear, I recommend that you take a look at the sources (toggle source in the docs). In some cases, it helps to understand what is going on.

require:

VALUE rb_f_require(VALUE obj, VALUE fname) {
  return rb_require_safe(fname, rb_safe_level());
}

require_relative:

VALUE rb_f_require_relative(VALUE obj, VALUE fname) {
    VALUE base = rb_current_realfilepath();
    if (NIL_P(base)) {
        rb_loaderror("cannot infer basepath");
    }
    base = rb_file_dirname(base);
    return rb_require_safe(rb_file_absolute_path(fname, base), rb_safe_level());
}

This allows us to conclude that

require_relative('path')

is the same as:

require(File.expand_path('path', File.dirname(__FILE__)))

because:

rb_file_absolute_path   =~ File.expand_path
rb_file_dirname1        =~ File.dirname
rb_current_realfilepath =~ __FILE__
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If anyone can guess why the downvote, I'd love to hear so I can learn. –  Ciro Santilli Nov 6 at 16:44

I just saw the RSpec's code has some comment on require_relative being O(1) constant and require being O(N) linear. So probably the difference is that require_relative is the preferred one than require.

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