Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my question is shown in this code

i have class like that

public class  maincs
{
  public int a;
  public int b;
  public int c;
  public int d; 
}

public class  sub1
{
  public int a;
  public int b;
  public int c;
}


public void methoda (sub1 model)
{
  maincs mdata = new maincs(){a = model.a , b = model.b , c= model.c} ;   

  // is there is away to directly cast class sub1 into main like that    
  mdata = (maincs) model;    
}
share|improve this question
1  
This code doesn't make sense. Post code that compiles (it's not the cast that's the problem). –  µBio Sep 8 '10 at 23:46
1  
Quite harsh.. Missing a class keyword doesnt take the sense away. –  nawfal Jan 16 at 4:56
    
There are existing lightweight mapper libraries written already for exactly this purpose. They handle a lot more edge cases. You can google it. –  nawfal Jan 16 at 5:15
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

what he wants to say is

if you have two classes which shares most of the properties can you cast an object from class a to class b and automatically make the system understand the assignment by shared properties names ?

option1: use reflection

disadvantage : gonna slow you down more than you think.

option2: make one derive from another and have one with common properties and other extend that

disadvantage: coupled ! if your doing that for 2 layers in your application then the 2 layers will be coupled


not sure if that what you mean !! correct me if im wrong


Let there be :

class customer
{
    public string firstname { get; set; }
    public string lastname { get; set; }
    public int age { get; set; }
}
class employee
{
    public string firstname { get; set; }
    public int age { get; set; } 
}

now here is an extension for Object type

public static T Cast<T>(this Object myobj)
{
    Type objectType = myobj.GetType();
    Type target = typeof(T);
    var x = Activator.CreateInstance(target, false);
    var z = from source in objectType.GetMembers().ToList()
        where source.MemberType == MemberTypes.Property select source ;
    var d = from source in target.GetMembers().ToList()
        where source.MemberType == MemberTypes.Property select source;
    List<MemberInfo> members = d.Where(memberInfo => d.Select(c => c.Name)
       .ToList().Contains(memberInfo.Name)).ToList();
    PropertyInfo propertyInfo;
    object value;
    foreach (var memberInfo in members)
    {
        propertyInfo = typeof(T).GetProperty(memberInfo.Name);
        value = myobj.GetType().GetProperty(memberInfo.Name).GetValue(myobj,null);

        propertyInfo.SetValue(x,value,null);
    }   
    return (T)x;
}  

now you use it like this :

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var cus = new customer();
    cus.firstname = "John";
    cus.age = 3;
    employee emp =  cus.Cast<employee>();
}

method cast check common properties between two object and do the assignment and return new object all ready.

share|improve this answer
    
That what i mean exactly –  Khalid Omar Sep 9 '10 at 1:54
    
Nice solution, but as you said, overhead and complexity :) –  Noctis Apr 14 at 0:19
add comment

You have already defined the conversion, you just need to take it one step further if you would like to be able to cast. For example:

public class sub1
{
    public int a;
    public int b;
    public int c;

    public static explicit operator maincs(sub1 obj)
    {
        maincs output = new maincs() { a = obj.a, b = obj.b, c = obj.c };
        return output;
    }
}

Which then allows you to do something like

static void Main()
{
    sub1 mySub = new sub1();
    maincs myMain = (maincs)mySub;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even better than the selected answer –  Noctis Apr 14 at 0:19
add comment

You could change your class structure to:

public class maincs : sub1
{
   public int d; 
}

public class sub1
{
   public int a;
   public int b;
   public int c;
}

Then you could keep a list of sub1 and cast some of them to mainc.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't compile either. Maybe you forgot the class keyword –  Carlos Muñoz Sep 8 '10 at 23:48
    
Oops, that's what I get for copy/paste. –  Jake Pearson Sep 9 '10 at 2:04
add comment

You can provide an explicit overload for the cast operator:

public static explicit operator maincs(sub1 val)
{
    var ret = new maincs() { a = val.a, b = val.b, c = val.c };
    return ret;
}

Another option would be to use an interface that has the a, b, and c properties and implement the interface on both of the classes. Then just have the parameter type to methoda be the interface instead of the class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

By using following code you can copy any class object to another class object for same name and same type of properties.

public class CopyClass
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Copy an object to destination object, only matching fields will be copied
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="sourceObject">An object with matching fields of the destination object</param>
    /// <param name="destObject">Destination object, must already be created</param>
    public static void CopyObject<T>(object sourceObject, ref T destObject)
    {
        //  If either the source, or destination is null, return
        if (sourceObject == null || destObject == null)
            return;

        //  Get the type of each object
        Type sourceType = sourceObject.GetType();
        Type targetType = destObject.GetType();

        //  Loop through the source properties
        foreach (PropertyInfo p in sourceType.GetProperties())
        {
            //  Get the matching property in the destination object
            PropertyInfo targetObj = targetType.GetProperty(p.Name);
            //  If there is none, skip
            if (targetObj == null)
                continue;

            //  Set the value in the destination
            targetObj.SetValue(destObject, p.GetValue(sourceObject, null), null);
        }
    }
}

Call Method Like,

ClassA objA = new ClassA();
ClassB objB = new ClassB();

CopyClass.CopyObject(objOfferMast, ref objB);

It will copy objA into objB.

share|improve this answer
    
Please be aware that if you're using this solution, you might run into issues when classes have the same name for properties, but with different types. For example: public class A { public int Age{get;set;}} and public class B { public string Age{get;set;}} Will throw an exception, if you're trying to convert from A to B –  Noctis Apr 14 at 0:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.