Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
typedef struct pilha Pilha;

struct pilha
{
    char metodo[31];
    Pilha *next;
};

void create_empty_stack(Pilha *Stack)
{
    Stack->next = NULL;
}

int main()
{
    Pilha *Stack;

    create_empty_stack(Stack);
}

Gives me an execution error.

What's the problem with this function?

share|improve this question
1  
Smells like homework. –  Robert Harvey Sep 9 '10 at 3:10
    
Is that a stack or a list? –  dreamlax Sep 9 '10 at 3:30
    
@dreamlax: it's a stack implemented as a singly linked list. –  JeremyP Sep 9 '10 at 10:52
    
You say you get an error but you dont tell what error, why? What happens? Any error messages? What did you expect to happen? –  mizipzor Sep 9 '10 at 11:01
    
You would do well to think about what you're trying to achieve when you say 'empty stack'. Do you want a stack with NO elements in it or ONE 'empty' element in it? –  JustJeff Sep 9 '10 at 11:15
add comment

4 Answers 4

This is a classic mistake that beginners do.

Let's take a look at your main function:

int main()
{
    Pilha* Stack; // This line is your problem!

    create_empty_stack(Stack);
}

If you remember pointers, the declaration Pilha* Stack; makes Stack be a memory pointer. But right now it doesn't point to anything, because you did not reserve memory for an object of type Pilha!

Your program crashes because create_empty_stack() tries to access next, a member of this object (remember that this object still doesn't exist).

So, what you should be doing instead is:

int main()
{
   // Reserve space in memory for one Pilha object and 
   // make Stack point to this memory address.
    Pilha* Stack = (Pilha*) malloc(sizeof(Pilha)); 

    create_empty_stack(Stack);
}

Or a much simpler approach:

int main()
{
    Pilha Stack; // Declare a new Pilha object

    // and pass the memory address of this new object to create_empty_stack()
    create_empty_stack(&Stack); 
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

you'd better create your function like this:

Pilha* create_empty_stack()
{

    Pilha *Stack = malloc(sizeof(Pilha))
    Stack->next = NULL;
    return Stack;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You are passing an uninitialized variable Stack into the function Criar_Pilha_vazia. It will crash as soon as you do the first dereference on Stack in your function.

share|improve this answer
    
to be fair, the behavior is undefined. local variables are uninitialized or zeroed so theoretically you could get a valid pointer. –  luke Sep 9 '10 at 3:15
    
@luke first time i heard of anti-Murphy .. is something even has an remote chance of going correct .. it just may !!! –  Vardhan Sep 9 '10 at 3:50
2  
When in doubt, assume it formats your hard drive. –  Nathan Ernst Sep 9 '10 at 3:59
1  
Oh yeah. The worst thing it can do is appear to work. Then you go on and depend on it, and when other things don't work due to the dangling pointers you have a real mystery that can take a lot of effort to identify. –  RBerteig Sep 9 '10 at 7:17
add comment

Consider what Stack points to at the line in *Criar_Pilha_vazia()*. The dereference for assignment points to a random place. In a virtual memory environment, it will segfault.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.