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It seems that these code snippets ought to behave identically:

1: Monitor.TryEnter(object)

if (Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject))
{
    try
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
    finally
    {
        Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
    }
}

2: Monitor.TryEnter(object, ref bool) - introduced in .NET 4.0

bool lockAcquired;
try
{
    Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject, ref lockAcquired);
    if (lockAcquired)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
}
finally
{
    if (lockAcquired)
    {
        Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
    }
}

I see from the MSDN documentation on the overload taking a ref bool parameter:

If the lock was not taken because an exception was thrown, the variable specified for the lockTaken parameter is false after this method ends. This allows the program to determine, in all cases, whether it is necessary to release the lock.

But the documentation also states that the overload taking only the object parameter throws no exceptions other than ArgumentNullException. So it seems like if an exception were thrown in code snippet 1 above, it could only be because lockObject is null, in which case no lock was taken (and TryEnter would've returned false) anyway, so the Monitor.Exit call would not be needed.

Clearly they would not have introduced this overload for no reason. So what scenario is the Monitor.TryEnter(object, ref bool) method intended to address?

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1  
Wow, that took a while. This method is only present in .NET 4. –  leppie Sep 9 '10 at 7:46
    
@leppie: Sorry about that! Thanks for adding the tag; I will update the question to make this unmistakably clear. –  Dan Tao Sep 9 '10 at 7:54
    
No problem :) –  leppie Sep 9 '10 at 7:56
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted
  1. Monitor.TryEnter could succeed and then an asynchroneous exception like ThreadAbortException or OutOfMemoryException (that can happen without visible allocations) is triggered. Then the lock would be taken but never released.

See: Locks and exceptions do not mix

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this be true of either overload, though? That is, how would this scenario be prevented by the second overload? –  Dan Tao Sep 9 '10 at 7:53
2  
Ohhh I see (visited the link)... so in other words an exception could be thrown after the TryEnter but before entering the try/finally block. Got it. –  Dan Tao Sep 9 '10 at 7:57
    
Too bad there's no "nice" way to apply similar logic to a "Using"-style block. It's possible to kludge a constructor to 'sneak out' a reference to a partially-constructed object before it does anything that will need to be undone, and only invoke the constructor from a factory method which can use the smuggled reference to dispose the partially-constructed object, but it would be nice if there were a better way to do that. Maybe change the framework so that if construction fails on an object which implements iDisposeOnConstructorException, the framework would call iDOCE.dispose on it? –  supercat Oct 6 '10 at 16:27
    
The current JIT contains a hack that makes the 'sneak out' scenario impossible. You can also reimplement the using-block yourself: C c = null; try { c = new C(); } finally { if (c!= null) c.Dispose(); } –  usr Oct 6 '10 at 21:10
    
@usr: I don't think the "sneak-out" is impossible; if the constructor of the deepest base class that holds any IDisposable fields takes a ref parameter of type IDisposable, and copies this to that parameter, and all derived-class constructors contain a similar parameter and pass it to their parent, then even if an exception occurs sometime between the assignment of that parameter and the time the constructor exits, the object under construction will be available to the calling code. It's a kludge, but it's the only safe way I know to ensure that things get cleaned up. –  supercat May 8 '13 at 16:46
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