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Consider an haskell-expression like the following: (Trivial example, don't tell me what the obvious way is! ;)

toBits :: Integral a => a -> [Bool]
toBits 0 = []
toBits n = x : toBits m where
 (m,y) = n `divMod` 2
  x    = y /= 0

Because this function is not tail-recursive, one could also write:

toBits :: Integral a => a -> [Bool]
toBits = toBits' [] where
  toBits' l 0 = l
  toBits' l n = toBits (x : l) m where
    (m,y) = n `divMod` 2
     x    = y /= 0

(I hope there is nothing wron whithin this expression)

What I want to ask is, which one of these solutions is better. The advantage of the first one is, that it can be evaluated partitially very easy (because Haskell stops at the first : not needed.), but the second solution is (obviously) tail-recursive, but in my opinion it needs to be completely evaluated until you can get something out.

The background for this is my Brainfuck parser, (see my optimization question), which is implemented very uggly (various reverse instructions... ooh), but can be implemented easily in the first - let's call it "semi-tail-recursion" way.

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3  
nitpick: if y == 0 then False else True can be written simpler as y /= 0. –  KennyTM Sep 9 '10 at 15:38
    
Obvious ;) changed it. –  FUZxxl Sep 10 '10 at 12:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let me rename the second version and fix a few typos so that you can test the functions.

toBits :: Integral a => a -> [Bool]
toBits 0 = []
toBits n = x : toBits m where
 (m,y) = n `divMod` 2
 x     = y /= 0

toBits2 :: Integral a => a -> [Bool]
toBits2 = toBits' [] where
  toBits' l 0 = l
  toBits' l n = toBits' (x : l) m where
    (m,y) = n `divMod` 2
    x     = y /= 0

These functions don't actually compute the same thing; the first one produces a list starting with the least significant bit, while the second one starts with the most significant bit. In other words toBits2 = reverse . toBits, and in fact reverse can be implemented with exactly the same kind of accumulator that you use in toBits2.

If you want a list starting from the least significant bit, toBits is good Haskell style. It won't produce a stack overflow because the recursive call is contained inside the (:) constructor which is lazy. (Also, you can't cause a thunk buildup in the argument of toBits by forcing the value of a late element of the result list early, because the argument needs to be evaluated in the first case toBits 0 = [] to determine whether the list is empty.)

If you want a list starting from the most significant bit, either writing toBits2 directly or defining toBits and using reverse . toBits is acceptable. I would probably prefer the latter since it's easier to understand in my opinion and you don't have to worry about whether your reimplementation of reverse will cause a stack overflow.

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I was not shure about the order of the bits in the latter one. Thank you for notifieing. –  FUZxxl Sep 12 '10 at 2:38

I think you've got it all just right. The first form is in general better because useful output can be obtained from it before it has completed computation. That means that if 'toBits' is used in another computation the compiler can likely combine them and the list that is the output of 'toBits' may never exist at all, or perhaps just one cons cell at a time. Nice that the first version is also more clear to read!

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1  
You may want to delete one of the duplicated answers. –  KennyTM Sep 9 '10 at 15:39
    
The other question is: How to avoid the large amount of stack involved by the first one? –  FUZxxl Sep 10 '10 at 11:59

In Haskell, your first choice would typically be preferred (I would say "always," but you're always wrong when you use that word). The accumulator pattern is appropriate for when the output can not be consumed incrementally (e.g. incrementing a counter).

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