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I wonder what is slower or faster:

if( @$myvar['test'] === null ) { .. }

or:

if( !isset( $myvar['test'] )) { .. }

Also wondering if you suppress a warning or notice with @, will it make the evaluation slower?

Thanks for your answer!

PS: It is not about the difference, i know that isset checks if a element is set and not if it is empty or not. But in my case is only important to know if it is empty.

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What about !empty( $myvar['test'] ) ? It checks if variable is set and not empty. –  hsz Sep 9 '10 at 13:25
    
Apart from isset, you could also use array_key_exists for arrays. –  Gumbo Sep 9 '10 at 13:33
    
Empty is to test if it is empty VALUE, not if it is assigned or not. when $myvar['test'] contains a zero (0), empty reports that it is empty while it is not realy empty. Reported as (empty == true): '', "", 0, null. The name of this function is a bit confusing. –  Erwinus Sep 10 '10 at 15:12

6 Answers 6

Generally the use of @ does create an overhead in the event of an error condition, so I'd expect it to be slower... and I'd say that using that syntax is less intuitive. Don't try to micro-optimise at the expense of readability

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Suppressing warnings with @ does slow down things. isset() should be the way to go here.

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<?
$myvar = array();

$start = microtime(true);
for($x=0;$x<100000;$x++){

    if( @$myvar['test'] === null ) { }

}
$end = microtime(true);
$duration = $end-$start;
printf("Test 1: %s \n", $duration);


$start = microtime(true);
for($x=0;$x<100000;$x++){

    if( !isset( $myvar['test'] )) {  }

}
$end = microtime(true);
$duration = $end-$start;
printf("Test 2: %s \n", $duration);

// populate 
$myvar['test'] = true;

$start = microtime(true);
for($x=0;$x<100000;$x++){

    if( @$myvar['test'] === null ) { }

}
$end = microtime(true);
$duration = $end-$start;
printf("Test 3: %s \n", $duration);


$start = microtime(true);
for($x=0;$x<100000;$x++){

    if( !isset( $myvar['test'] )) {  }

}
$end = microtime(true);
$duration = $end-$start;
printf("Test 4: %s \n", $duration);

Result:
Test 1: 0.18865299224854
Test 2: 0.012698173522949
Test 3: 0.11134600639343
Test 4: 0.015975952148438

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+1 You must accept this answer. It is a plus for the entire PHP community. –  Theodore R. Smith Sep 9 '10 at 23:01
    
Thank you so much for the answer. I accept this as answer. isset is faster. –  Erwinus Sep 10 '10 at 14:49
    
If you accept, you should really mark the answer as accepted. –  Ollie Sep 11 '10 at 19:08

As an aside, I remember reading some tip that claims that strict testing with === is actually marginally quicker than ==

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in PHP it doesn't matter

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not true as you can see above –  Erwinus Sep 10 '10 at 15:17
    
@Erwinus in a way. When I see such a nonsense, it drives me kinda crazy. But it's ok. thanks for your concern. –  Your Common Sense Sep 11 '10 at 14:24
    
This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. You can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Rostyslav Dzinko Aug 20 '12 at 7:37

Only one way to find out for sure - test it.

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-1 This isn't an answer. The test results (above), are. –  Jon B Sep 15 '10 at 19:28

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