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I'm wondering if there is a "best" choice for collation in MySQL for a general website where you aren't 100% of what will be entered? I understand that all the encodings should be the same, such as MySQL, Apache, the HTML and anything inside PHP.

In the past I have set PHP to output in "UTF-8", but which collation does this match in MySQL? I'm thinking it's one of the UTF-8 ones, but I have used utf8_unicode_ci, utf8_general_ci, and utf8_bin before.

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Side note: MySQL's "utf8" isn't proper UTF-8 (no support for 4+ byte Unicode characters like 𝌆), however "utf8mb4" is. With utf8, a field will be truncated on insert starting with the first unsupported Unicode character. mathiasbynens.be/notes/mysql-utf8mb4 –  basic6 Apr 27 at 17:47

9 Answers 9

up vote 263 down vote accepted

The main difference is sorting accuracy (when comparing characters in the language) and performance. The only special one is utf8_bin which is for comparing characters in binary format.

utf8_general_ci is somewhat faster than utf8_unicode_ci, but less accurate (for sorting). The specific language utf8 encoding (such as utf8_swedish_ci) contain additional language rules that make them the most accurate to sort for those languages. Most of the time I use utf8_unicode_ci (I prefer accuracy to small performance improvements), unless I have a good reason to prefer a specific language.

You can read more on specific unicode character sets on the MySQL manual - http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/charset-unicode-sets.html

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small performance improvements ? are you sure about this ? publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/db2luw/v9r5/index.jsp?topic=/… The collation you choose can significantly impact the performance of queries in the database. –  Adam Ramadhan Aug 7 '10 at 7:54
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This is for DB2 not MySQL. Also, there are no concrete numbers or benchmarks so you are just basing it on the opinion of the writer. –  Eran Galperin Aug 9 '10 at 12:14
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Note that if you want to use functions, there is a bug in MySQL (most currently distributed versions) where functions always return the string using utf8_general_ci, causing problems if you're using another collation for your strings - see bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=24690 –  El Yobo Feb 9 '11 at 10:49
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From my experience with different locales I'd always use utf8_unicode_* –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 17 '12 at 22:51
    

Be very, very aware of this problem that can occur when using utf8_general_ci.

MySQL will not distinguish between some characters in select statements, if the utf8_general_ci collate is used. This can lead to very nasty bugs - especially for example, where usernames are involved. Depending on the implementation that uses the database tables, this problem could allow malicious users to create a username matching an administrator account.

This problem exposes itself at the very least in early 5.x versions - I'm not sure if this behaviour as changed later.

I'm no DBA, but to avoid this problem, I always go with 'utf8-bin' instead of a case-insensitive one.

The script below describes the problem by example.

-- first, create a sandbox to play in
CREATE DATABASE `sandbox`;
use `sandbox`;

-- next, make sure that your client connection is of the same 
-- character/collate type as the one we're going to test next:
charset utf8 collate utf8_general_ci

-- now, create the table and fill it with values
CREATE TABLE `test` (`key` VARCHAR(16), `value` VARCHAR(16) )
    CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

INSERT INTO `test` VALUES ('Key ONE', 'value'), ('Key TWO', 'valúe');

-- (verify)
SELECT * FROM `test`;

-- now, expose the problem/bug:
SELECT * FROM test WHERE `value` = 'value';

--
-- Note that we get BOTH keys here! MySQLs UTF8 collates that are 
-- case insensitive (ending with _ci) do not distinguish between 
-- both values!
--
-- collate 'utf8_bin' doesn't have this problem, as I'll show next:
--

-- first, reset the client connection charset/collate type
charset utf8 collate utf8_bin

-- next, convert the values that we've previously inserted in the table
ALTER TABLE `test` CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin;

-- now, re-check for the bug
SELECT * FROM test WHERE `value` = 'value';

--
-- Note that we get just one key now, as you'd expect.
--
-- This problem appears to be specific to utf8. Next, I'll try to 
-- do the same with the 'latin1' charset:
--

-- first, reset the client connection charset/collate type
charset latin1 collate latin1_general_ci

-- next, convert the values that we've previously inserted
-- in the table
ALTER TABLE `test` CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_ci;

-- now, re-check for the bug
SELECT * FROM test WHERE `value` = 'value';

--
-- Again, only one key is returned (expected). This shows 
-- that the problem with utf8/utf8_generic_ci isn't present 
-- in latin1/latin1_general_ci
--
-- To complete the example, I'll check with the binary collate
-- of latin1 as well:

-- first, reset the client connection charset/collate type
charset latin1 collate latin1_bin

-- next, convert the values that we've previously inserted in the table
ALTER TABLE `test` CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_bin;

-- now, re-check for the bug
SELECT * FROM test WHERE `value` = 'value';

--
-- Again, only one key is returned (expected).
--
-- Finally, I'll re-introduce the problem in the exact same 
-- way (for any sceptics out there):

-- first, reset the client connection charset/collate type
charset utf8 collate utf8_generic_ci

-- next, convert the values that we've previously inserted in the table
ALTER TABLE `test` CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

-- now, re-check for the problem/bug
SELECT * FROM test WHERE `value` = 'value';

--
-- Two keys.
--

DROP DATABASE sandbox;
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11  
-1: This is surely remedied by applying a unique key to the relevant column. You would see the same behaviour if the two values were 'value' and 'valUe'. The whole point of a collation is that it provides rules for (among other things) when two strings are considered equal to one another. –  Hammerite Jun 9 '11 at 10:26
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That's exactly the problem that I'm trying to illustrate - the collation makes two things equal while they in fact are not intended to be equal at all (and thus, a unique constraint is exactly the opposite of what you'd want to achive) –  Guus Aug 10 '11 at 19:49
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But you describe it as a "problem" and leading to "bugs" when the behaviour is exactly what a collation is intended to achieve. Your description is correct, but only in as much as it is an error on the part of the DBA to select an inappropriate collation. –  Hammerite Aug 11 '11 at 15:42
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The thing is that, when you enter two usernames that are considered equal by the collation, it will not be allowed if you set the coloumn username to be unique, which you should of course do! –  Student of Hogwarts Dec 1 '12 at 10:54

Actually, you probably want to use utf8_unicode_ci or utf8_general_ci.

  • utf8_general_ci sorts by stripping away all accents and sorting as if it were ASCII
  • utf8_unicode_ci uses the Unicode sort order, so it sorts correctly in more languages

However, if you are only using this to store english text, these shouldn't differ.

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I like your explaination! Good one. But I need better understanding on exactly why unicode sort order is better way to sort correctly than stripping away accents. –  Adam Jun 5 '13 at 13:23
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@Adam It really depends on your target audience. Sorting is a tricky problem to localize correctly. E.g. in Norwegian the letters Æ Ø Å are the last 3 of the alphabet. With utf8_general_ci, Ø and Å gets converted to O and A, which puts them in the completely wrong position when sorted (I am not sure how Æ is handled, as it is a ligature, not an accented character). This sort order is different in almost any language, e.g. Norwegian and Swedish have different orders (and slightly different letters which are considered equal): Æ Ø Å is sorted Å Æ Ø (actual letters are Å Ä Ö). Unicode fixes this. –  Vegard Larsen Jun 6 '13 at 6:18
    
So what I am basically saying, is that you should probably use a language-specific sort if you can, but in most cases that is unfeasible, so go for Unicode general sorting. It will still be strange in some language, but more correct than ASCII. –  Vegard Larsen Jun 6 '13 at 6:19
    
Got it , thanks! –  Adam Jun 6 '13 at 13:28
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@Manatax - with any of the utf8_ collations, the data is stored as utf8. The collation is just about what characters are considered equal, and how they're ordered. –  frymaster Oct 29 '13 at 11:55

Collations affect how data is sorted and how strings are compared to each other. That means you should use the collation that most of your users expect.

Example from the documentation:

utf8_general_ci also is satisfactory for both German and French, except that ‘ß’ is equal to ‘s’, and not to ‘ss’. If this is acceptable for your application, then you should use utf8_general_ci because it is faster. Otherwise, use utf8_unicode_ci because it is more accurate.

So - it depends on your expected user base and on how much you need correct sorting. For an English user base, utf8_general_ci should suffice, for other languages, like Swedish, special collations have been created.

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i was using utf8_general_ci and it took a couple of second while sorting and armscii_general_ci did it extremely quick.Why this happened?One more Question , What do you think which collation is used by social networking sites –  user1432124 May 4 '12 at 15:27

Essentially, it depends on how you think of a string.

I always use utf8_bin because of the problem highlighted by Guus. In my opinion, as far as the database should be concerned, a string is still just a string. A string is a number of UTF-8 characters. A character has a binary representation so why does it need to know the language you're using? Usually, people will be constructing databases for systems with the scope for multilingual sites. This is the whole point of using UTF-8 as a character set. I'm a bit of a pureist but I think the bug risks heavily outweigh the slight advantage you may get on indexing. Any language related rules should be done at a much higher level than the DBMS.

In my books "value" should never in a million years be equal to "valúe".

If I want to store a text field and do a case insensitive search, I will use MYSQL string functions with PHP functions such as LOWER() and the php function strtolower().

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If binary comparison of strings is your desired comparison, then of course you should use the binary collation; but to dismiss alternative collations as a "bug risk" or being simply for convenience of indexing suggests that you do not fully understand the point of a collation. –  Hammerite Jun 9 '11 at 10:32

For UTF-8 textual information, you should use utf8_general_ci because...

  • utf8_bin: compare strings by the binary value of each character in the string

  • utf8_general_ci: compare strings using general language rules and using case-insensitive comparisons

a.k.a. it will should making searching and indexing the data faster/more efficient/more useful.

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The accepted answer fairly definitively suggests using utf8_unicode_ci, and whilst for new projects that's great, I wanted to relate my recent contrary experience just in case it saves anyone some time.

Because utf8_general_ci is the default collation for Unicode in MySQL, if you want to use utf8_unicode_ci then you end up having to specify it in a lot of places.

For example, all client connections not only have a default charset (makes sense to me) but also a default collation (i.e. the collation will always default to utf8_general_ci for unicode).

Likely, if you use utf8_unicode_ci for your fields, your scripts that connect to the database will need to be updated to mention the desired collation explicitly -- otherwise queries using text strings can fail when your connection is using the default collation.

The upshot is that when converting an existing system of any size to Unicode/utf8, you may end up being forced to use utf8_general_ci because of the way MySQL handles defaults.

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For the case highlighted by Guus, I would strongly suggest using either utf8_unicode_cs (case sensitive, strict matching, ordering correctly for the most part) instead of utf8_bin (strict matching, incorrect ordering).

If the field is intended to be searched, as opposed to matched for a user, then use utf8_general_ci or utf8_unicode_ci. Both are case-insensitive, one will losely match (‘ß’ is equal to ‘s’, and not to ‘ss’). There are also language specific versions, like utf8_german_ci where the lose matching is more suitable for the language specified.

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FYI: utf8_unicode_cs doesn't not exist. The only case-sensitive utf8 is utf8_bin. Problem is utf8_bin sorting is incorrect. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/15218077/… –  Costa Apr 10 '13 at 3:35

For the casee field is intended to be searched, as opposed to matched for a user, then use utf8_general_ce field is intended to be searched, as opposed to matched for a user, then use utf8_general_ci or utf8_unicode_ci. Both are case-insensitive, one will losely match (‘ß’ is equal to ‘s’, and not to ‘ss’). There are also language specific versions, like utf8_german_ci where the lose matching is more suitable for the language specified.i or utf8_unicode_ci. Both are case-insensitive, one will losely match (‘ß’ is equal to ‘s’, and not to ‘ss’). There are also language specific versions, like utf8_german_ci where the lose matching is more suitable for the language specified. highlighted by Guus, I would strongly suggest using either utf8_unicode_cs (case sensitive, strict matching, ordering ce field is intended to be searched, as opposed to matched for a user, then use utf8_general_ci or utf8_unicode_ci. Both are case-insensitive, one will losely match (‘ß’ is equal to ‘s’, and not to ‘ss’). There are also language specific versions, like utf8_german_ci where the lose matching is more suitable for the language specified.orrectly for the most part) instead of utf8_bin (strict matching, incorrect ordering).

If the field is intended to be searched, as opposed to matched for a user, then use utf8_general_ci or utf8_unicode_ci. Both are case-insensitive, one will losely match (‘ß’ is equal to ‘s’, and not to ‘ss’). There are also language specific versions, like utf8_german_ci where the lose matching is more suitable for the language specified.

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