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For example, can I take this script (from mozilla tutorial):

<html>
 <head>
  <script type="application/javascript">
    function draw() {
      var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
      if (canvas.getContext) {
        var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

        ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(200,0,0)";
        ctx.fillRect (10, 10, 55, 50);

        ctx.fillStyle = "rgba(0, 0, 200, 0.5)";
        ctx.fillRect (30, 30, 55, 50);
      }
    }
  </script>
 </head>
 <body onload="draw();">
   <canvas id="canvas" width="150" height="150"></canvas>
 </body>
</html>

and mix this JavaScript with jQuery's document.ready instead of relying on onload?

share|improve this question
57  
jQuery is regular JavaScript. –  Gumbo Sep 9 '10 at 13:48
7  
Sometimes it is even better to use "plain" JavaScript constructs, e.g. if you want to access standard attributes of DOM elements. People that are new to jQuery tend to "overuse" it imo. jQuery is great, but it is just a tool that gives you some useful functions at hand. The question is not jQuery or JavaScript but JavaScript with or without the help of jQuery. –  Felix Kling Sep 9 '10 at 13:54
    
yes you can mix both –  user443454 Sep 9 '10 at 14:01
    
Yes we can!&nbsp; –  Stephan Muller Sep 9 '10 at 14:04
1  
its not jquery's fault if people don't understand the language itself. –  mikeycgto Jul 8 '11 at 21:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Yes, they're both JavaScript, you can use whichever functions are appropriate for the situation.

In this case you can just put the code in a document.ready handler, like this:

$(function() {
  var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
  if (canvas.getContext) {
    var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

    ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(200,0,0)";
    ctx.fillRect (10, 10, 55, 50);

    ctx.fillStyle = "rgba(0, 0, 200, 0.5)";
    ctx.fillRect (30, 30, 55, 50);
  }
});
share|improve this answer

of course you can, but why to do this? You have to include additional file with jQuery libs, what generates one more request. Then you will load whole jQ object just for use one single function which, because of it's additional 'layer' between user and JS, will execute slower than 'pure' javascript code.

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1  
Good point - for tiny things, the jQuery library may be overkill. As soon as you go into something more complex than "hide this on click", jQuery saves you (as a developer) quite a lot of hassle - simplifies working with the elements and provides baseline cross-browser compatibility (even for IE6 - before jQ, this was a source of endless frustration).At 17KB, it's not really a bandwith hog. Moreover, if you load the library from Google, people may already have it loaded, so no additional request is needed: encosia.com/2008/12/10/… –  Piskvor Sep 10 '10 at 10:15

Why is MichalBE getting downvoted? He's right - using jQuery (or any library) just to fire a function on page load is overkill, potentially costing people money on mobile connections and slowing down the user experience. If the original poster doesn't want to use onload in the body tag (and he's quite right not to), add this after the draw() function:

if (draw) window.onload = draw;

Or this, by Simon Willison, if you want more than one function to be executed:

function addLoadEvent(func) {
    var oldonload = window.onload;
    if (typeof window.onload != 'function') {
        window.onload = func;
    } else {
        window.onload = function() {
            if (oldonload) {
                oldonload();
            }
            func();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That kind of lower-level hacking around the DOM, messing with the inline handlers, and cross-browser quirks thereof, is precisely the reason jQuery was born. Yes, it is possible, and yes, you should (as a JS developer) know what it does and how; but the point of jQuery is to provide a convenient abstraction above that. While jQ is overkill for the first example, it is already perfectly appropriate in the second. –  Piskvor Sep 10 '10 at 10:08
3  
OK, but I still think it's wrong to make the user download an entire library just to add a load function, however good the abstraction. –  tagawa Sep 14 '10 at 8:02
3  
Piskvor - Im going to sue your ass for making me throw up a little bit in my mouth. –  Chase Wilson Sep 15 '10 at 22:13

Or no JavaScript load function at all...

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <canvas id="canvas" width="150" height="150"></canvas>
</body>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var draw = function() {
        var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
        if (canvas.getContext) {
            var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

            ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(200,0,0)";
            ctx.fillRect (10, 10, 55, 50);

            ctx.fillStyle = "rgba(0, 0, 200, 0.5)";
            ctx.fillRect (30, 30, 55, 50);
        }
    }
    draw();

    //or self executing...

    (function(){
        var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
        if (canvas.getContext) {
            var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

            ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(200,0,0)";
            ctx.fillRect (50, 50, 55, 50);

            ctx.fillStyle = "rgba(0, 0, 200, 0.5)";
            ctx.fillRect (70, 70, 55, 50);
        }
    })();
</script>
</html>
share|improve this answer

You can, but be aware of the return types with jQuery functions. jQuery won't always use the exact same JavaScript object type, although generally they will return subclasses of what you would expect to be returned from a similar JavaScript function.

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