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I have a Terms and Conditions document that I want to place in my website, that consists of a number of sub-headings with bullet points under these sub-headings.

In HTML, I want to make these bullet points into an ordered lists within each sub-section, which seems to work fine, but how can I carry the numbering so that from the first ordered list to the very last one, the numbers start from 1 and carry through right to N?

At the moment, I have to create for each sub-section, an open and close ordered list tag, so I never have a incremental list from start to finish.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

Give the first ordered list a CSS style that includes counter-reset: chapter, and give all subsequent ordered lists a style that includes counter-increment: chapter.

Edited to add: My understanding here wasn't complete. The "counter" stuff works only with the CSS "content" attribute, which inserts generated content. So the solution needs to use that attribute. Unfortunately, that is only supported in Internet Explorer starting with version 8.

<html>
<style type="text/css">

#firstList {
   counter-reset: chapter;
}
li{
   list-style-type:none;
   counter-increment: chapter;
}
li:before {
   content:counter(chapter) ". ";
}
</style>
<ul id="firstList">
   <li>first item</li>
   <li>second item</li>
   <li>third item</li>
</ul>
<p>intermediate text</p>
<ul>
   <li>fourth item</li>
   <li>fifth item</li>
   <li>sixth item</li>
</ul>
</html>
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quick and elegant solution, not many people know how to use the counter –  Stephan Muller Sep 9 '10 at 15:40
    
hi @JacobM - unfortunately I tried this and was not able to get this going for my requirement. Are you able to provide an example of this at jsfiddle.net based on my requirement? Thanks. –  tonsils Sep 16 '10 at 14:22
    
Yeah, my understanding wasn't complete. Edited to expand and add an example. –  Jacob Mattison Sep 16 '10 at 17:36

This is one of the reasons HTML5 allows the start attribute again:

<h1>1</h1>
<ol>
  <li>...
  <li>...
  <li>...
</ol>
<h1>2</h1>
<ol start=4>
  <li>...
  <li>...
  <li>...
</ol>

You'll need to update them all if you add or remove an item, but that shouldn't be too common in a ToC.

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