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Here is a boolean expression that does the trick:

nvl(:new.location != :old.location, (:new.location is null) != (:old.location is null))

But I would like to think there was a simpler expression. Any ideas?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
decode(:old.location, :new.location, 1) is null

edit: It might be more clear to say:

decode(:old.location, :new.location, null, 1) = 1
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I like the simplicity of your first version. It's unfortunate that it isn't very obvious what it does, but with enough use, I suppose it could become idiomatic. It's simple enough that it could easily be recognized. –  rattigan Oct 21 '10 at 20:31

These shorter methods all have several disadvantages. They are slow, unintuitive, potentially buggy (avoid magic values whenever possible), and more proprietary than normal conditions like AND/OR/IS NULL/IS NOT NULL.

NVL, DECODE, COALESCE, etc., can be more expensive than you think.

I've seen this lots of times in several different contexts, here's a simple example:

--Shorter method: Takes about 0.45 seconds
declare
  j number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 1000000 loop
    j := i;
    if nvl(i <> j, (i is null) <> (j is null)) then
      null;
    end if;
  end loop;
end;
/

--Normal method: Takes about 0.25 seconds
declare
  j number;
begin
  for i in 1 .. 1000000 loop
    j := i;
    if i <> j or (i is null and j is not null) or (i is not null and j is null) then
      null;
    end if;
  end loop;
end;
/

I recommend you spend the extra second to type it the logical way. Your code will look better and run faster.

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I don't know why but in our environment 11g R1 it's in opposite way. The first nvl-solution takes avg 0,125 seconds and the second solution takes 0,235 seconds. And if I comment out "j := 1" then both are about 0,05 seconds faster. –  Jokke Heikkilä Oct 29 '10 at 8:06

You could create an overloaded package function like this:

package p is

    function changed (p_old varchar2, p_new varchar2) return voolean;
    function changed (p_old number, p_new number) return voolean;
    function changed (p_old date, p_new date) return voolean;

end;

Then just call it in your triggers:

if p.changed(:old.location,:new.location) then ...

Alternatively you can just do this:

if nvl(:old.location,'£$%') != nvl(:new.location,'£$%') then ...

Of course, you have to pick a value that could never be a real location, which may be tricky in some cases. For VARCHAR2 you could pick a value that's too long for the column size (unless that happens to be 4000).

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Perhaps you only want the trigger to fire at all if the value has changed? If so, you are best to use this syntax when creating the trigger:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER DepartTrigger BEFORE UPDATE OF location ON Department
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... although you still need to check for a change as "update department set location = location" would fire the trigger. –  Nick Pierpoint Sep 10 '10 at 8:37

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