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Is there a way to run a piece of JavaScript code only ONCE, without using boolean flag variables to remember whether it has already been ran or not?

Specifically not something like:

var alreadyRan = false;
function runOnce() {
  if (alreadyRan) {
    return;
  }
  alreadyRan = true;

  /* do stuff here */

}

I'm going to have a lot of these types of functions and keeping all booleans would be messy...

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2  
You need to clarify the question a bit more. –  Josh K Sep 9 '10 at 16:43
1  
Just don't use loops? –  irishbuzz Sep 9 '10 at 16:44
    
Don't call it twice? –  EboMike Sep 9 '10 at 16:46
    
But people will call if more than once and I want the counters to only activate once. –  naknode Sep 9 '10 at 16:47
9  
not a bad question once you understand it. –  Alexandre C. Sep 9 '10 at 16:58

9 Answers 9

up vote 68 down vote accepted

An alternative way that overwrites a function when executed so it will be executed only once.

function useThisFunctionOnce(){
   // overwrite this function, so it will be executed only once
   useThisFunctionOnce = Function("");
   // real code below
   alert("Hi!");
}

// displays "Hi!"
useThisFunctionOnce();
// does nothing
useThisFunctionOnce();

'Useful' example:

var preferences = {};
function read_preferences(){
   // read preferences once
   read_preferences = Function("");
   // load preferences from storage and save it in 'preferences'
}
function readPreference(pref_name){
    read_prefences();
    return preferences.hasOwnProperty(pref_name) ? preferences[pref_name] : '';
}
if(readPreference('like_javascript') != 'yes'){
   alert("What's wrong wth you?!");
}
alert(readPreference('is_stupid') ? "Stupid!" : ":)");

Edit: as CMS pointed out, just overwriting the old function with function(){} will create a closure in which old variables still exist. To work around that problem, function(){} is replaced by Function(""). This will create an empty function in the global scope, avoiding a closure.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 For a clever solution! –  Nate W. Sep 9 '10 at 16:45
6  
+1 indeed! Putting a new meaning to "this function will self-destruct after first use". –  EboMike Sep 9 '10 at 16:47
6  
+1 for understanding the question –  gawi Sep 9 '10 at 16:53
14  
I would strongly discourage the usage of this pattern, because all variables, arguments, and inner FunctionDeclarations of the first function, will be never be garbage collected, this might not be obvious, but it's true, the empty function is created within the first one, this creates a closure, and all identifiers will remain live, creating a memory leak. I would recommend either, declare the empty function outside, or use the Function constructor, e.g. useThisFunctionOnce = Function("");. Try this test to see how effectively all variables remain in-scope. –  CMS Oct 21 '10 at 23:06
2  
Good point CMS, I updated my answer. –  Lekensteyn Oct 23 '10 at 20:55

I like Lekensteyn's implementation, but you could also just have one variable to store what functions have run. The code below should run "runOnce", and "runAgain" both one time. It's still booleans, but it sounds like you just don't want lots of variables.

var runFunctions = {};

function runOnce() {
  if(!hasRun(arguments.callee)) {
   /* do stuff here */
   console.log("once");
  }
}

function runAgain() {
  if(!hasRun(arguments.callee)) {
   /* do stuff here */
   console.log("again");
  }
}


function hasRun(functionName) {
 functionName = functionName.toString();
 functionName = functionName.substr('function '.length);
 functionName = functionName.substr(0, functionName.indexOf('('));

 if(runFunctions[functionName]) {
   return true;
 } else {
   runFunctions[functionName] = true;
   return false;
 }
}

runOnce();
runAgain();
runAgain();
share|improve this answer
1  
(Note: I still like Lekensteyn's implementation better) –  Mike Robinson Sep 9 '10 at 20:37
    
Three lines for parsing the function name is kinda heavy. I recommend a simple regexp solution: functionName = func.toString().match(/\w+(?=\()/)[0] –  bennedich Sep 10 '10 at 0:21
    
@Mike Robinson - Why is there two function definitions for runAgain()? –  irishbuzz Sep 10 '10 at 9:37
1  
@irish - Because ... umm.... extra reliability? :) (Removed one of them) –  Mike Robinson Sep 10 '10 at 14:09
    
@bennedich - I like the idea of a regex, but the one you supplied doesn't work, and returns "function" when I fix it –  Mike Robinson Sep 10 '10 at 14:28

A problem with quite a few of these approaches is that they depend on function names to work: Mike's approach will fail if you create a function with "x = function() ..." and Lekensteyn's approach will fail if you set x = useThisFunctionOnce before useThisFunctionOnce is called.

I would recommend using Russ's closure approach if you want it run right away or the approach taken by Underscore.js if you want to delay execution:

function once(func) {
    var ran = false, memo;
    return function() {
        if (ran) return memo;
        ran = true;
        return memo = func.apply(this, arguments);
    };
}

var myFunction = once(function() {
    return new Date().toString();
});

setInterval(function() {console.log(myFunction());}, 1000);

On the first execution, the inner function is executed and the results are returned. On subsequent runs, the original result object is returned.

share|improve this answer
    
I've been trying to understand Underscore's once and I'm confused. On the second call, isn't ran re-declared and initialized to false, thereby calling func.apply() a second time? –  Seabiscuit Jul 30 at 13:32
    
@Seabiscuit once returns the inner function and run was defined in the outer function. The result is a closure where run and memo are shared by all calls to the function. –  Brian Nickel Jul 30 at 13:38
    
I imagined that's how that worked. What I still don't get is how (and here I'm admitting my ignorance of how closures work at a deep level) when the call is made to once(func) the variable assignment in the outer function, namely ran = false does not affect the value of ran in the return function. Since every call to once(func) invokes the outer and inner functions, then ran = false is assigned every time once(func) is called. –  Seabiscuit Jul 30 at 14:03
    
@Seabiscuit Closures are created any time a function is called and a function in its scope outlives it. If I call once twice, I get two closures each with their own ran value. If I call the returned functions, they set run = true in their own closure scope and don't interfere with each other. –  Brian Nickel Jul 30 at 17:46

What about an immediately invoked anonymous function?

(function () {

    // code in here to run once

})();

the code will execute immediately and leave no trace in the global namespace.

If this code is going to need to be called from elsewhere, then a closure can be used to ensure that the contents of a function are run only once. Personally, I prefer this to a function that rewrites itself as I feel doing so can cause confusion, but to each their own :) This particular implementation takes advantage of the fact that 0 is a falsy value.

var once = (function() {
  var hasRun = 0;  
  return function () {
    if (!hasRun) {
      hasRun++;   

      // body to run only once

      // log to the console for a test       
      console.log("only ran once");
    }              
  }
})();

// test that the body of the function executes only once
for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) 
  once();
share|improve this answer

Elegant solution from Douglas Crockford, spent some time to understand how it works and stumbled upon this thread.

So the wrapper once return function which is just invokes parameter's function you passed. And taking advantage of closures this construction replaced passed function to empty function, or null in original source, after the first call, so all the next calls will be useless.

This is something very close to all other answers, but it is kinda self containing code and you could use it independently, which is good. I am still trying to grasp all the entire mechanism of replacement, but practically it just works perfectly.

function once (func) {

 return function () {
   var f = func;
   func = null;
   return f.apply(this, arguments);
 };

}

function hi(name) {
  console.log("Hi %s", name);
}

sayonce = once(hi);
sayonce("Vasya");
sayonce("Petya");

for those who are curious here is jsbin transformations

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(function (){

  var run = (function (){

    var func, blank = function () {};

    func = function () {
      func = blank;

      // following code executes only once 
      console.log('run once !');
    };

    return function(){
      func.call();
    };
  })();

  run();
  run();
  run();
  run();

})();
share|improve this answer

I just ran into this problem, and ended up doing something like the following:

function runOnce () {
    if (!this.alreadyRan) {
        // put all your functionality here
        console.log('running my function!');

        // set a property on the function itself to prevent it being run again
        this.alreadyRan = true;
    }
}

This takes advantage of the fact that Javascript properties are undefined by default.

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In addition, the nature of what happens in the "/* do stuff here */" may leave something around that, when present, must mean that the function has run e.g.

var counter = null;

function initCounter() {
  if (counter === null) {
    counter = 0;
  }
}
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If not bound to an event, code is usually ran once

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1  
And what about loops? –  Daff Sep 9 '10 at 16:47
    
simple enough, considering the question. –  Zlatev Sep 9 '10 at 16:48

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