Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got the following two SQL tables (in MySQL):

Phone_book
+----+------+--------------+
| id | name | phone_number |
+----+------+--------------+
| 1  | John | 111111111111 |
+----+------+--------------+
| 2  | Jane | 222222222222 |
+----+------+--------------+

Call
+----+------+--------------+
| id | date | phone_number |
+----+------+--------------+
| 1  | 0945 | 111111111111 |
+----+------+--------------+
| 2  | 0950 | 222222222222 |
+----+------+--------------+
| 3  | 1045 | 333333333333 |
+----+------+--------------+

How do I find out which calls were made by people whose phone_number is not in the Phone_book? The desired output would be:

Call
+----+------+--------------+
| id | date | phone_number |
+----+------+--------------+
| 3  | 1045 | 333333333333 |
+----+------+--------------+

Any help would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Neither the question nor the answer is MySQL specific. I have updated the question and tags. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 15 '08 at 9:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 119 down vote accepted

There's several different ways of doing this, with varying efficiency, depending on how good your query optimiser is, and the relative size of your two tables:

This is the shortest statement, and may be quickest if your phone book is very short:

SELECT  *
FROM    Call
WHERE   phone_number NOT IN (SELECT phone_number FROM Phone_book)

alternatively (thanks to Alterlife)

SELECT *
FROM   Call
WHERE  NOT EXISTS
  (SELECT *
   FROM   Phone_book
   WHERE  Phone_book.phone_number = Call.phone_number)

or (thanks to Kieran)

SELECT * 
FROM   Call
LEFT OUTER JOIN Phone_Book
  ON (Call.phone_number = Phone_book.phone_number)
  WHERE Phone_book.phone_number IS NULL

(ignoring that, as others have said, it's normally best to select just the columns you want, not '*')

share|improve this answer
    
avoid IN, use EXISTS - the hint is in the question title –  annakata Dec 15 '08 at 12:02
8  
The left outer join is probably quickest in the general case as it prevents repeated execution of the subquery. –  WOPR Dec 15 '08 at 21:40
    
Not to be picky, but the subquery on my suggestion returns <code>select 'x'</code> and not <code>select *</code> –  Alterlife Dec 17 '08 at 8:36
    
yes - MySQL manual suggests that this is normal for an 'EXISTS' query –  Alnitak Dec 17 '08 at 9:31
SELECT Call.ID, Call.date, Call.phone_number 
FROM Call 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Phone_Book 
  ON (Call.phone_number=Phone_book.phone_number) 
  WHERE Phone_book.phone_number IS NULL

Should remove the subquery, allowing the query optimiser to work it's magic.

Also, avoid "SELECT *" because it can break your code if someone alters the underlying tables or views (and it's inefficient).

share|improve this answer
3  
This is generally the most efficient method as it does not perform multiple passes on the second table ... hope some people are reading the comemnts. –  Nerdfest Dec 15 '08 at 11:57
    
I would rather hope that people profile: unless you're a top SQL performance guru, telling in advance what will be the fastest is quite difficult (and depends on the DBMS engine you use). –  bortzmeyer Dec 16 '08 at 8:59

The code below would be a bit more efficient than the answers presented above when dealing with larger datasets.

SELECT * FROM Call WHERE 
NOT EXISTS (SELECT 'x' FROM Phone_book where 
Phone_book.phone_number = Call.phone_number)
share|improve this answer
    
As always, it's worth profiling the performance of the queries against your target dataset to choose the one with the best performance. SQL optimisers are good enough these days that the performance results are often surprising. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 15 '08 at 9:44

I think

SELECT CALL.* FROM CALL LEFT JOIN Phone_book ON 
CALL.id = Phone_book.id WHERE Phone_book.name IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
The id column in the call table is not the same value as the id column in the Phone_book table, so you can't join on these values. See WOPR's answer for a similar approach. –  Michael Fredrickson Feb 15 '12 at 23:11
SELECT DISTINCT Call.id 
FROM Call 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Phone_book USING (id) 
WHERE Phone_book.id IS NULL

This will return the extra id-s that are missing in your Phone_book table.

share|improve this answer
SELECT t1.ColumnID,
CASE 
    WHEN NOT EXISTS( SELECT t2.FieldText  
                     FROM Table t2 
                     WHERE t2.ColumnID = t1.ColumnID) 
    THEN t1.FieldText
    ELSE t2.FieldText
END FieldText       
FROM Table1 t1, Table2 t2
share|improve this answer
    
This will return you data from one table if data is not present in another table for the same column –  Harvinder Sidhu Oct 24 '13 at 14:55
    
Could you also add some explanation of what this solves? –  Steven Westbrook Oct 24 '13 at 15:20

protected by Community Dec 26 '13 at 5:04

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.