Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the most succinct Scala way to reverse a Map? The Map may contain non-unique values.

EDIT:

The reversal of Map[A, B] should give Map[B, Set[A]] (or a MultiMap, that would be even better).

share|improve this question
3  
Define what is to happen if a given value is present under more than one key. –  Randall Schulz Sep 9 '10 at 17:28
    
@Randall: See the edit. –  missingfaktor Sep 9 '10 at 17:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you can lose duplicate keys:

scala> val map = Map(1->"one", 2->"two", -2->"two")
map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,java.lang.String] = Map((1,one), (2,two), (-2,two))

scala> map.map(_ swap)
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map((one,1), (two,-2))

If you don't want access as a multimap, just a map to sets, then:

scala> map.groupBy(_._2).mapValues(_.keys.toSet)
res1: scala.collection.immutable.Map[
  java.lang.String,scala.collection.immutable.Set[Int]
] = Map((one,Set(1)), (two,Set(2, -2)))

If you insist on getting a MultiMap, then:

scala> import scala.collection.mutable.{HashMap, Set, MultiMap}
scala> ( (new HashMap[String,Set[Int]] with MultiMap[String,Int]) ++=
     |          map.groupBy(_._2).mapValues(Set[Int]() ++= _.keys) )
res2: scala.collection.mutable.HashMap[String,scala.collection.mutable.Set[Int]]
with scala.collection.mutable.MultiMap[String,Int] = Map((one,Set(1)), (two,Set(-2, 2)))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for succinctness, and for introducing me to mapValues :-) –  Rodney Gitzel Sep 9 '10 at 18:25
    
a better starting would be clearer though, e.g. Map(1->"one", 2->"two",3->"two",4->"two") –  Rodney Gitzel Sep 9 '10 at 18:26
    
@Rodney - Okay, okay, I'll show the overlap case! –  Rex Kerr Sep 9 '10 at 18:32
    
Thanks a lot! :-) –  missingfaktor Sep 9 '10 at 18:46
scala> val m1 = Map(1 -> "one", 2 -> "two", 3 -> "three", 4 -> "four")
m1: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,java.lang.String] = Map((1,one), (2,two), (3,three), (4,four))

scala> m1.map(pair => pair._2 -> pair._1)
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map((one,1), (two,2), (three,3), (four,4))

Edit for clarified question:

object RevMap {
  def
  main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val m1 = Map("one" -> 3, "two" -> 3, "three" -> 5, "four" -> 4, "five" -> 5, "six" -> 3)

    val rm1 = (Map[Int, Set[String]]() /: m1) { (map: Map[Int, Set[String]], pair: (String, Int)) =>
                                                 map + ((pair._2, map.getOrElse(pair._2, Set[String]()) + pair._1)) }

    printf("m1=%s%nrm1=%s%n", m1, rm1)
  }
}

% scala RevMap
m1=Map(four -> 4, three -> 5, two -> 3, six -> 3, five -> 4, one -> 3)
rm1=Map(4 -> Set(four, five), 5 -> Set(three), 3 -> Set(two, six, one))

I'm not sure this qualifies as succinct.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the working solution. :-) –  missingfaktor Sep 9 '10 at 18:46

How about:

  implicit class RichMap[A, B](map: Map[A, Seq[B]])
  {
    import scala.collection.mutable._

    def reverse: MultiMap[B, A] =
    {
      val result = new HashMap[B, Set[A]] with MultiMap[B, A]

      map.foreach(kv => kv._2.foreach(result.addBinding(_, kv._1)))

      result
    }
  }

or

  implicit class RichMap[A, B](map: Map[A, Seq[B]])
  {
    import scala.collection.mutable._

    def reverse: MultiMap[B, A] =
    {
      val result = new HashMap[B, Set[A]] with MultiMap[B, A]

      map.foreach{case(k,v) => v.foreach(result.addBinding(_, k))}

      result
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.