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I'm writing an rspec scenario thats failing with:

 (#<User:0x1056904f0>).update_attributes(#<RSpec::Mocks::ArgumentMatchers::AnyArgMatcher:0x105623648>)
     expected: 1 time
     received: 0 times

users_controller_spec.rb:

describe "Authenticated examples" do
  before(:each) do
    activate_authlogic
    @user = Factory.create(:valid_user)
    UserSession.create(@user)
  end

describe "PUT update" do
    it "updates the requested user" do
      User.stub!(:current_user).and_return(@user)
      @user.should_receive(:update_attributes).with(anything()).and_return(true)
      put :update, :id => @user , :current_user => {'email' => 'Trippy'}
      puts "Spec Object Id : " + "#{@user.object_id}"
 end

users_controller.rb:

def update
  @user = current_user
  puts "Controller Object ID is : " + "#{@user.object_id}"

  respond_to do |format|
    if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
      format.html { redirect_to(root_url, :notice => 'Successfully updated profile.') }
      format.xml  { head :ok }
    else
      format.html { render :action => "edit" }
      format.xml  { render :xml => @user.errors, :status => :unprocessable_entity }
    end
  end
end

user.rb - factories

Factory.define :valid_user, :class => User do |u|
  u.username "Trippy"
  u.password "password"
  u.password_confirmation "password"
  u.email "elephant@gmail.com"
  u.single_access_token "k3cFzLIQnZ4MHRmJvJzg"
  u.id "37"
end
share|improve this question
    
Updated my rspec scenario to the advice of all the answers, but its still returning the same error. –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 21:26
    
Updated the specificity of stubbing the current_user, and updated the error above. –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Authlogic's standard helper methods like current_user don't call User.find directly. I believe it does current_user_session.user, where current_user_session calls UserSession.find, so you're not calling User.find directly. You could do some fancy chain stubbing there, but my suggestion is just to add this to your controller spec instead of what you're currently stubbing:

stub!(:current_user).and_return(@user)

In RSpec2 you might have to do

controller.stub!(:current_user).and_return(@user)

Edit: This should be your whole spec file:

describe "Authenticated examples" do
  before(:each) do
    activate_authlogic
    @user = Factory.create(:valid_user)
    UserSession.create(@user)
  end

describe "PUT update" do

  describe "with valid params" do
    it "updates the requested user" do
      stub!(:current_user).and_return(@user)
      @user.should_receive(:update_attributes).with(anything()).and_return(true)
      put :update, :id => @user , :current_user => {'email' => 'Trippy'}
    end
 end
share|improve this answer
    
Alright. I concede. But why is the update_attributes not passing? –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 21:21
    
You're setting the expectation for update_attributes on the @user instance variable you created in the spec, but if your User.find stub isn't returning that exact instance variable, the user it does return doesn't have the expectation set on it. Try adding puts @user.object_id in the controller and in the spec and see if they differ. –  Robert Speicher Sep 9 '10 at 21:37
    
Not sure how to simultaneously get those puts statement. For the controller, I added puts @user.obect_id, but where would I put that in the spec? or how I should say? it doesn't return the puts statement from i run spec. –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 21:56
    
Adding a puts anywhere inside the it ... do block should display the output when you run spec, either through rake or just spec or rspec –  Robert Speicher Sep 9 '10 at 22:12
    
Spec Object Id : 2192867960 && controller object id is : 2192167180 !!! Oh def getting close now :D –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 22:25

I think you're confusing stubs with message expectations. The line

User.should_receive(:find)

tells Rspec to expect the User model to receive a find message. Whereas:

User.stub!(:find)

replaces the find method so that the test can pass. In your example the thing you're testing is whether update_attributes is called successfully, so that ought to be where the message expectation goes, and the job of all the other testing code is just to set up the prerequisites.

Try replacing that line with:

User.stub!(:find).and_return(@user)

Note that find returns the object, not just its id. Also, note that stubbing out find here serves only to speed things up. As written the example gets through should_receive(:find) successfully, and that is happening because you're using Factories to create users in the test database. You could take the stub out and the test should still work, but at the cost of hitting the database.

Another tip: if you're trying to figure out why a controller test isn't working, sometimes it's helpful to know if it is being blocked by before filters. You can check for this with:

controller.should_receive(:update)

If that fails, the update action is not being reached, probably because a before filter has redirected the request.

share|improve this answer
    
The stub cleared up the find error. Makes so much sense. The update error did fail, so I moved that authenticated examples before() method for each child declaration ( GET , PUT, POST, DELETE ) .But it still fails on the second error, ` (#<User:0x10564d3a8>).update_attributes({"username"=>"Trippy"}) expected: 1 time received: 0 times` –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 20:02
    
It's possible you're not getting the exact hash param you're expecting. Try changing it to should_receive(:update_attributes).with(anything()).and_return(true) –  Robert Speicher Sep 9 '10 at 20:50
    
Ah! So happy I know that syntax. But alas, it returns the same error. So I assume then that its not updating or being called right. Just not entirely sure why. –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 20:54
    
Hmm. I'm not sure what's going on there. Maybe it's time to fire up the debugger and see where the request is being intercepted. btw, not to confuse things, but it looks like your controller doesn't do a find on User at all. You set @user from current_user instead of using the ID in the params. That's fine if it's what you intended. –  zetetic Sep 9 '10 at 20:56
    
Ah! So would you change put :update, :id => "1" , :user => {'email' => 'Trippy'} * to * put :update, :id => "1" , :current_user => {'email' => 'Trippy'}? It doesn't work, but something along those lines? –  Trip Sep 9 '10 at 21:07

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