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The sequence goes like this.. 7,8,77,78,87,88,777,778,787,788 and so on..

What can be the logic for finding the nth number of the sequence? I tried that by dividing it by 2 and then by 4 and hence, but it doesn't seem to work.

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closed as off topic by Henk Holterman, Roger Pate, bmargulies, ho1, Michael Petrotta Sep 12 '10 at 2:41

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9  
People who vote to close it: how is algorithm for finding n-th element of sequence is off-topic? –  Nikita Rybak Sep 9 '10 at 20:07
2  
It'd be nice if people commented but if i had to guess it's that it smells like homework and a complete answer rather than a hint is being asked for. –  Paul Sasik Sep 9 '10 at 20:18
1  
@Nikita Rybak: It doesn't make sense to have a n-th element algorithm. Any sequence can continue in any way. –  Thomas Ahle Sep 9 '10 at 20:23
3  
Consider this sequence: [0, 1, 00, 01, 10, 11, 000, 001, 010, 011]. It's the same as yours. –  Thomas Ahle Sep 9 '10 at 20:25
1  
@Thomas: It does seem to have a certain similarity, but that doesn't really explain the reason to close. What about that sequence is unworthy of being in a question? –  recursive Sep 9 '10 at 20:29
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7 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Observations:

  1. The sequence appears to be an ascending list of numbers containing only the digits 7 and 8.

  2. The number of digits is non-decreasing and for each n-digit section, there are 2 ** n numbers in the sequence.

  3. The first half of the n-digit numbers starts with 7, and the second half starts with 8.

  4. For each half of the n-digit numbers, the remaining digits after the first are the same as the n-1 digit numbers.

These facts can be used to construct a reasonably efficient recursive implementation.

Here is a C# implementation:

void Main() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        Console.WriteLine (GetSequence(i));
}

string GetSequence(int idx) {
    if (idx == 0) return "7";
    if (idx == 1) return "8";

    return GetSequence(idx / 2 - 1) + GetSequence(idx % 2);
}

Output:

7
8
77
78
87
88
777
778
787
788
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+1 I like it! ' –  Nikita Rybak Sep 9 '10 at 20:13
2  
seems you are obsessed with recursion.. :) –  vaibhav Sep 9 '10 at 20:24
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Binary, counting from two, ignoring the leading digit, using 7 and 8 for zero and one:

        7,  8,  77,  78,  87,  88,  777,  778,  787,  788
 0, 1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010, 1011 
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nicest solution..!! –  vaibhav Sep 9 '10 at 20:29
    
+1 for the solution. Wonderful observation Pete! Here is the python 2.6 implementation -for i in range(2,15):print "".join(map((lambda x: ('8','7')[x=='0']), bin(i)[2:])[1:]), –  Gangadhar Sep 10 '10 at 5:24
1  
Bloated. Here: for i in range(2,15):print"".join('78'[int(x)]for x in bin(i)[3:]), –  recursive Sep 10 '10 at 18:13
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Since size of block is growing exponentially (2 elements of length 1, 4 elements of length 2, 8 elements of length 3, etc), you can easily determine number of digits in result number.

    long block_size = 2;
    int len = 1;
    while (n > block_size) {
        n -= block_size;  // n is changed here
        block_size *= 2;
        ++len;
    }

Now, you just create binary representation of n - 1, with 7 for zeroes and 8 for ones (padding it to length len with zeroes). Quite simple.

I assume indexes start from 1 here.

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lets take n=10.. that must give 788 as answer.. or 011. but for n=10, n-1 is 9 which gives the binary sequence of 1001.. taking the block size as 3 we select last three binaries i.e. 001 which is not the answer..!! –  vaibhav Sep 9 '10 at 19:59
1  
@vaibhav Note, we change n in the loop too. I edited answer to emphasize it. –  Nikita Rybak Sep 9 '10 at 20:04
    
ohh ya.. my mistake.. thanks a lot.. –  vaibhav Sep 9 '10 at 20:05
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substitute 0 for 7 and 1 for 8 and treat it like a binary sequence

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4  
Not exactely: 7* = 0* will always be 0. –  tur1ng Sep 9 '10 at 19:48
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Written as PHP. I assume that the sequence elements are numbered starting from 1.

$n = 45;
// let's find the 45th sequence element.
$length = 1;
while ( $n >= pow(2, $length + 1) - 1 ) {
    $length++;
}
// determine the length in digits of the sequence element
$offset = $n - pow(2, $length) + 1;
// determine how far this sequence element is past the
// first sequence element of this length
$binary = decbin($offset);
// obtain the binary representation of $offset, as a string of 0s and 1s
while ( strlen($binary) < $length ) {
    $binary = '0'.$binary;
}
// left-pad the string with 0s until it is the required length
$answer = str_replace( array('0', '1'),
                       array('7', '8'),
                       $binary
                       );
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+1: Looks like we had the same idea. ;) You can actually avoid the first while loop by using the log and floor functions. –  gnovice Sep 9 '10 at 20:50
    
Yes, I considered log() and floor(), but I wasn't sure whether floor() would cause problems due to floating-point inaccuracy in php. –  Hammerite Sep 9 '10 at 22:41
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It looks like a simple binary sequence, where 7 represents binary zero, and 8 represents binary 1.

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4  
ok.. then why the third number is 77 or in your case.. 00..?? –  vaibhav Sep 9 '10 at 19:48
2  
The sequence restarts at binary zero, but with two digits instead of one. And so on. Each time the sequence overflows its digits, restart at zero and add another digit. –  Robert Harvey Sep 9 '10 at 19:50
1  
The problem is to find the nth element, and that would require enumerating all elements until n. –  recursive Sep 9 '10 at 19:53
    
@recursive: Not really. d = 1; seq = n; while (seq >= 2^d) { seq -= 2^d; ++d; }. You'll be returning the seq'th d-digit sequence, which turns trivially into the required sequence by converting 0 into 7 and 1 into 8. –  cHao Sep 9 '10 at 20:10
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You can compute this directly for the Nth number (num) without recursion or looping by doing the following (the sample code is in MATLAB):

  • Compute the number of digits in the number:

    nDigits = floor(log2(num+1));
    
  • Find the binary representation of the number num (only the first nDigits digits) after first subtracting one less than two raised to the power nDigits:

    binNum = dec2bin(num-(2^nDigits-1),nDigits);
    
  • Add 7 to each value in the string of ones and zeroes:

    result = char(binNum+7);
    

And here's a test, putting the above three steps into one anonymous function f:

>> f = @(n) char(dec2bin(n+1-2^floor(log2(n+1)),floor(log2(n+1)))+7);
>> for n = 1:20, disp(f(n)); end
7
8
77
78
87
88
777
778
787
788
877
878
887
888
7777
7778
7787
7788
7877
7878
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