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i dont understand what does following code?

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;
struct node{
    int k; node * l,*r;
    node (int  t){
        k=t; l=0;r=0;
    }    
};

typedef node * link;
link Max(int a[],int l,int r)
{
    int m=(r+l)/2;
    link x=new node(a[m]);
    if (l==r) return x;
    x->l=Max(a,l,r);
    x->r=Max(a,m+1,r);
    int u=x->l->k;
    int v=x->r->k;
    if (u>v) 
        x->k=u;  
    else x->k=v;
    return x;

}

int main()
{
    int *a=new int[100];
    int n=sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]);
    for (int i=0;i<n;i++){
        a[i]=rand() ;        
    }
    //for (int i=0;i<n;i++){

    //  cout<<a[i]<< "  ";
    //}
    cout<<Max(a,0,n-1)<< "  ";

    return 0;
}
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closed as not a real question by Kirill V. Lyadvinsky, Cătălin Pitiș, Anna Lear, therefromhere, GManNickG Sep 9 '10 at 20:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Which part don't you understand? –  sepp2k Sep 9 '10 at 19:52
1  
It looks like a water drop falling down a tree into a lake. Now someone edits it and destroys the cute code style :( –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 9 '10 at 19:54
1  
duplicate of reading others code ? –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 9 '10 at 19:54
1  
Hmmm... I see the water drop (big drop!) but not the lake. It looks more like a toilet to me. –  James Curran Sep 9 '10 at 19:55
1  
I bet you wrote this, and now you are wondering what it does. Am I right? –  someguy Sep 9 '10 at 20:24

5 Answers 5

On my machine, it leaks about 1300 bytes, misuses the rand function, prints an object's memory address instead of the value it contains, and uses a needlessly complex and highly obfuscated algorithm to compute the maximum value.

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6  
On my machine, it summons a minor demon. Now excuse me, I must go and look for the vacuum cleaner. –  Marco Mariani Sep 9 '10 at 20:17
    
@Marco: Be glad it was only one of those. The nasal ones are worse. Much worse. <wimpers> –  sbi Sep 9 '10 at 20:48

Analyzing in sections:

Section 1:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

These lines indicate C++. One could expect that this program may use console I/O and some standard C language functions.

Section 2:

using namespace std;

Lazy typist. Doesn't like typing std::cout instead of cout.

Section 3:

struct node{
    int k; node * l,*r;
    node (int  t){
        k=t; l=0;r=0;
    }    
};

Looks like a typical node in either a binary tree or a linked list. Given that l could be for left and r for right. These are links that could point to a left subtree and right subtree or left node and right node. Further reading required.

Section 4:

typedef node * link;

Indication of a C language programmer using C++. This declares link as a synonym for a pointer to a node.

Section 5:

link Max(int a[],int l,int r)
{
    int m=(r+l)/2;
    link x=new node(a[m]);
    if (l==r) return x;
    x->l=Max(a,l,r);
    x->r=Max(a,m+1,r);
    int u=x->l->k;
    int v=x->r->k;
    if (u>v) 
        x->k=u;  
    else x->k=v;
    return x;
}

Looks like a recursive function to traverse a binary tree, looking for the maximum data value. It may insert this correctly; only deep analysis and debugging will tell.

Section 6:

int main()
{
    int *a=new int[100];
    int n=sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]);
    for (int i=0;i<n;i++){
        a[i]=rand() ;        
    }
    //for (int i=0;i<n;i++){

    //  cout<<a[i]<< "  ";
    //}
    cout<<Max(a,0,n-1)<< "  ";

    return 0;
}

Looks like it should be the main function which tests the building of the binary tree and displays the results. It's correctness to be determined (by debugging or careful review).

This is a classic example of code that would be faster to rewrite than to get working.

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3  
ahem... "Foolish lazy typist". He could have said "using std::cout;" which is better and less keystrokes. –  James Curran Sep 9 '10 at 20:18

Well, I only got as far as these lines: (starting from main())

int *a=new int[100]; 
int n=sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]); 

and I realized that it was broken, and figured that the rest wasn't worth my time.

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1  
Why the down vote? The code clearly does not do what it was intended to do. Not being a mind reader, it's a waste of time to try to figure out what the author's intentions were... –  James Curran Sep 9 '10 at 20:05
    
I wouldn't upvote it, but i don't understand the downvote either. –  Constantin Sep 9 '10 at 20:10
    
upvoted for stupid downvote –  Joel Sep 9 '10 at 20:15
1  
Stupid downvote? What if everyone posted "This question isn't worth my time" to every bad code snippet? That's hardly a useful answer. (the downvote wasn't me, but I give -1 in spirit) –  indiv Sep 9 '10 at 20:19
2  
I agree that this belongs as a comment, not an answer. –  Gabe Sep 9 '10 at 20:53

I think this code is trying to figure out the maximum number from the randomly generated 100 numbers using binary tree approach. But i think this code has bug in this line :

x->l=Max(a,l,r);

It should be

x->l=Max(a,l,m);
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This code will produce a StackOverflow on machines where sizeof(int) >= sizeof(int*). On machines where sizeof(int) < sizeof(int*), it will print some address in memory.

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