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I'm trying to take a file that store data of this form:

Name=”Biscuit”

LatinName=”Retrieverus Aurum”

ImageFilename=”Biscuit.png”

DNA=”ITAYATYITITIAAYI”

and read it with a regex to locate the useful information; namely, the fields and their contents.

I have created the regex already, but I can only seem to get one match at any given time, and would like instead to put each of the matches from each line in the file in their own index of a string.

Here's what I have so far:

Scanner scanFile = new Scanner(file); 
        while (scanFile.hasNextLine()){
            System.out.println(scanFile.findInLine(".*"));
            scanFile.nextLine();
        }
        MatchResult result = null;
        scanFile.findInLine(Constants.ANIMAL_INFO_REGEX);
        result = scanFile.match();


        for (int i=1; i<=result.groupCount(); i++){
            System.out.println(result.group(i));
            System.out.println(result.groupCount());
        }
        scanFile.close();
        MySpecies species = new MySpecies(null, null, null, null);
        return species;

Thanks so much for your help!

share|improve this question
    
It would probably be useful to include your regex too in case the problem lies there. –  Shadwell Sep 9 '10 at 23:46
    
possible duplicate of My regex is causing a stack overflow in Java; what am I missing? –  Alan Moore Sep 10 '10 at 7:12

1 Answer 1

I hope I understand your question correctly... Here is an example that is coming from the Oracle website:

/*
 * This code writes "One dog, two dogs in the yard."
 * to the standard-output stream:
 */
import java.util.regex.*;

public class Replacement {
    public static void main(String[] args) 
                         throws Exception {
        // Create a pattern to match cat
        Pattern p = Pattern.compile("cat");
        // Create a matcher with an input string
        Matcher m = p.matcher("one cat," +
                       " two cats in the yard");
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        boolean result = m.find();
        // Loop through and create a new String 
        // with the replacements
        while(result) {
            m.appendReplacement(sb, "dog");
            result = m.find();
        }
        // Add the last segment of input to 
        // the new String
        m.appendTail(sb);
        System.out.println(sb.toString());
    }
}

Hope this helps...

share|improve this answer
    
No, this doesn't apply at all. –  Alan Moore Sep 10 '10 at 11:12

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