Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Was tryin out the stackeroverflow qn so it got me thinking why not overload the the function and I came up with a slightly different code but it says the function cannot be overloaded. My question is why? or is there a another way?

 #include <iostream>
 using std::cout;

 class Test {
         public:
         Test(){ }
         int foo (const int) const;
         int foo (int );
 };

 int main ()
 {
         Test obj;
         Test const obj1;
         int variable=0;
     do{
         obj.foo(3);        // Call the const function 
          obj.foo(variable); // Want to make it call the non const function 
         variable++;
             usleep (2000000);
        }while(1);
 }

 int Test::foo(int a)
 {
    cout<<"NON CONST"<<std::endl;
    a++;
    return a;
 }

 int Test::foo (const int a) const
 {
    cout<<"CONST"<<std::endl;
    return a;
 }
share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "it says the function cannot be overloaded". Do you get a compilation error? What error? Or is it just the behaviour, that says it? If it's the behaviour, then your conclusion is wrong, I'm afraid. You actually overloaded successfully. The problem is, that the resolution is made based on a different thing, you think it should be. –  Maciej Hehl Sep 10 '10 at 10:28
    
@Maciej..yeah that was a compilation error..i have passed that point..Check out the follow up thread...stackoverflow.com/questions/3683881/… –  Sii Sep 10 '10 at 10:39

3 Answers 3

You can't overload based only on the constness of a non pointer, non reference type.

Think for instance if you were the compiler. Faced with the line:

 cout <<obj.foo(3);

which function would you call?

As you are passing by value the value gets copied either way. The const on the argument is only relevant to the function definition.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Nice explanation –  Chubsdad Sep 10 '10 at 3:31
    
+1 for providing not just rules, but insight behind them. –  Tony D Sep 10 '10 at 3:31
    
my idea was to make it call the foo (const int a) function..So hence my real question how would you make it call the const function( and also make it compilable) –  Sii Sep 10 '10 at 3:34
1  
@MrProg: As stated, the language doesn't support it. If you really to do that, do something like foo(const int&) and foo(int&). This will do what you want, though the non const version will be able to change the variable passed in. –  DominicMcDonnell Sep 10 '10 at 3:54

§13.1 where the Standard discusses about declarations that cannot be overloaded states -

Parameter declarations that differ only in the presence or absence of const and/or volatile are equivalent. That is, the const and volatile type-specifiers for each parameter type are ignored [...]

Only the const and volatile type-specifiers at the outermost level of the parameter type specification are ignored in this fashion; const and volatile type-specifiers buried within a parameter type specification are significant and can be used to distinguish overloaded function declarations. [...]

when determining which function is being declared, defined, or called. "In particular, for any type T, “pointer to T,” “pointer to const T,” and “pointer to volatile T” are considered distinct parameter types, as are “reference to T,” “reference to const T,” and “reference to volatile T.”

EDIT 2:

As the post is essentially the same as the reffered post, except that the overloaded functions are now class member functions, I am trying to illustrate an additional aspect that could be useful to illustrate the concept of overloading which is not the same as overloading based on the 'constness' of the arguments (either in class scope or namespace scope). However the OP wanted to know how to differentiate the two overloads.

A way to overload them successfully relies on the cv qualification of the implied first parameter in case of member function calls as shown. The 'const' member function can only be called when the object expression used to invoke the overloaded member function is also a const. When a non const object expression is used to invoke the overloaded member function call, the non const version is preferred as it is an exact match (the call to const member function overload will require cv qualification of the first implied argument)

#include <iostream> 
using std::cout; 

class Test { 
        public: 
        Test(){}
        int foo (const int) const; 
        int foo (int ); 
}; 

int main () 
{ 
        Test obj;
        Test const objc;  // const object
        obj.foo(3);       // calls non const overload, object expression obj is non const
        objc.foo(3);      // calls const overload, object expression objc is const
} 

int Test::foo(int a) 
{ 
   a++; 
   return a; 
} 

int Test::foo (const int a) const
{ 
   return a; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
@Chubsdad: Beat me to it –  DominicMcDonnell Sep 10 '10 at 3:27
2  
Heh. I like that the standard uses the extremely technical term, "buried," to describe non-top-level cv-qualifiers. :-P –  James McNellis Sep 10 '10 at 3:33
1  
@James McNellis: If this is confusing, I am all for deleting this post. –  Chubsdad Sep 10 '10 at 6:16
1  
@MrProg: I guess the quote from the standard is not clear. It basically means that void foo(int); and void foo(const int) are the same signature, in both cases the argument will be copied and the caller integer will not be modified. The difference in const there only affects the definition of the function, where in the second case the definition cannot modify its own copy of the value. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 10 '10 at 7:57
1  
@MrProg: if for some obscure reason you want int x; const int y; f(x); f(y); to call different functions (even if in neither case the function will modify x or y, you could use references: void f( int & x ); void f( const int & y ); but that will allow the first version to modify the x that is passed as argument, and thus is not semantically equivalent to your initial code. I really cannot see a use case where you would want to pass by value and still call different overloads if the argument was const/non-const. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 10 '10 at 8:04

As the answer to the other question explains, the two foos do not differ because they have equivalent parameter definitions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.