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Is there a best-practice pattern for completely resetting a database to a freshly-paved schema with JPA before a unit test? I have been using a testing persistence unit with hbml2ddl.auto=create-or-drop and recreating EMFs before each test, but I wonder if there's a cleaner way to do it.

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4 Answers

Unit tests should not talk to the database.

Assuming you're writing an integration test for your data access layer, you could use a tool like DBUnit, or you could create a static test helper that programmatically resets your database state by doing all of your deletes and inserts using JPA queries inside of a transaction.

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Could you justify your initial assertion? –  HenryR Sep 10 '10 at 5:44
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I guess the justification is 'because databases are slow'. This is true when using Oracle and so on, where even opening a connection is slow. It's not true for in-memory databases. –  Thomas Mueller Sep 10 '10 at 6:00
8  
I guess the justification is that "unit" tests are supposed to test "units" in isolation. As soon as you're involving a database, you're not doing unit testing but integration testing. It has nothing to do with the kind of database that is used. –  Pascal Thivent Sep 10 '10 at 6:49
    
Justification: artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=126923 –  Javid Jamae Sep 10 '10 at 12:03
1  
It's not called a unit test if it interacts with the database, it's an integration tests. Once you get in this mindset you realize that Unit testing is much less useful than you used to think. A give "Unit Test" only tests one method/class at a time. If your test chains to other "Units", it's an integration test or a system test. Integration tests are often run with JUnit as well, so they often get called unit tests. –  Bill K Jun 27 '12 at 18:17
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Resetting the database is not a big problem if you use a fast Java database such as the H2 database or HSQLDB. Compared to using Oracle / MySQL (or whatever you use for production) this will speed up your tests, and it will ensure all your code is tested as when using the 'real' production database.

For maximum performance, you can use H2 in-memory (that way you may not have to reset the database manually - it's reset automatically if the connection is closed), or you can use a regular persistent database. To reset the database after use in H2, run the (native) statement 'drop all objects delete files'.

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DBUnit has much of what you need, I use Springs Testing framework to rollback, transactions after each test see http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/spring-framework-reference/html/testing.html

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Is there a best-practice pattern for completely resetting a database to a freshly-paved schema with JPA before a unit test?

Don't reset the whole DB schema before every unit test, but reset the "DB environment (which is specific to the current unit test)" at END of each unit test.

We have an entity...

@Entity
public class Candidate implements {
    private String id;
    private String userName;
    private EntityLifeCycle lifeCycle;

    protected Candidate() {
    }
    public Candidate(String userName) {
        this.userName = userName;
    }

    @Id @GeneratedValue(generator="uuid", strategy=GenerationType.AUTO)
    @GenericGenerator(name="uuid", strategy="uuid", parameters = {})
    @Column(name="candidate_id", nullable=false, unique=true)
    public String getId() {
        return id;
    }
    protected void setId(String id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    @Column(name="user_name", nullable=false, unique=true)
    public String getUserName() {
        return userName;
    }
    public void setUserName(String userName) {
        this.userName = userName;
    }

    @Embedded
    public EntityLifeCycle getLifeCycle() {
        if(lifeCycle == null) {
            lifeCycle = new EntityLifeCycleImpl();
        }
        return lifeCycle;
    }
    public void setLifeCycle(EntityLifeCycleImpl lifeCycle) {
        this.lifeCycle = lifeCycle;
    }

    @PrePersist
    public void prePersist() {
         lifeCycle.setCreatedDate(new Date());
    }
}

We are setting the createdDate for each Candidate instance in prePersist() method. Here is a test case that asserts that createdDate is getting set properly....

   public class EntityLifeCycleTest {
    @Test
    public void testLifeCycle() {
        EntityManager manager = entityManagerFactory.createEntityManager();
        Candidate bond = new Candidate("Miss. Bond");
        EntityTransaction tx = manager.getTransaction();
        tx.begin();
        manager.persist(bond);
        tx.commit();

        Assert.assertNotNull(bond.getLifeCycle().getCreatedDate());
        manager.close();
    }
}

This test case will run properly for the first time. But if we run this test case second time it would throw ConstraintViolationException, because the userName is unique key.

Therefore, I think the right approach is to "clean the DB environment (which is specific to the current unit test)" at end of each test case. Like this...

public class EntityLifeCycleTest extends JavaPersistenceTest {
    @Test
    public void testLifeCycle() {
        EntityManager manager = entityManagerFactory.createEntityManager();
        Candidate bond = new Candidate("Miss. Bond");
        EntityTransaction tx = manager.getTransaction();
        tx.begin();
        manager.persist(bond);
        tx.commit();

        Assert.assertNotNull(bond.getLifeCycle().getCreatedDate());

      /* delete Candidate bond, so next time we can run this test case successfully*/
        tx = manager.getTransaction();
        tx.begin();
        manager.remove(bond);
        tx.commit();
        manager.close();
    }
}

I have been using a testing persistence unit with hbml2ddl.auto=create-or-drop and recreating EMFs before each test, but I wonder if there's a cleaner way to do it.

Recreating EMF before each test is time consuming, IMO.

Drop and recreate the DB schema only if you have made some changes to @Entity annotated class that affects the underlying DB (e.g. adding/removing columns and/or constraints). So first validate the schema, if the schema is valid don't recreate it, and if invalid then recreate it. Like this...

public class JavaPersistenceTest {
    protected static EntityManagerFactory entityManagerFactory;
@BeforeClass
public static void setUp() throws Exception {
    if(entityManagerFactory == null) {
         Map<String, String> properties = new HashMap<String, String>(1);
         try {
           properties.put("hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto", "validate");
          entityManagerFactory = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("default", properties);
    } catch (PersistenceException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        properties.put("hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto", "create");
        entityManagerFactory = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("default", properties);
    }
         }
}
}

Now, if you run all the test cases(that extend JavaPersistenceTest) in one go, the EMF will be created only once(or twice if the schema was invalid).

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I don't agree, Good setup don't need cleanup! –  Pascal Thivent Sep 10 '10 at 6:47
    
@PascalThivent It is not always true. If there is e.g. a test for a findAll() method and I would like to be sure there is no more record in the database than I expect, then yes, I would like clean up all other records before this test. Even if that db is mine, I would like keep it as clear as it is needed. –  Gabor Garami Mar 17 '12 at 17:38
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