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Say, I have the following unordered list. The button has width: auto. How do I style the elements, so #textField would stretch as much as possible, so the width of #textField and the button would add up to 100%? I.e. #textField's width == (100% of width) - (button's computed width).

<ul>
  <li>
    <input id="textField" type="text" /><input type="button" />
  </li>
</ul>

So, for example, let's say 100% width of li is 100 pixels: if the button's computed width is 30px, #textField's width would be 70px; if button's computed width is 25px, #textField's width would become 75px.

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You also need to consider the margin and padding attributes. If those are non- zero it may not look like 100%, although it is. –  extraneon Sep 10 '10 at 7:01
    
Have you voted down my answer, and if yes, why? –  PointedEars Jan 11 '12 at 10:04
    
@PointedEars I did not vote any answer down. –  William Niu Jan 11 '12 at 15:37
    
Thanks for replying. I would appreciate feedback then if you find it useful, since it achieves the desired effect "without using a table or JavaScript", which may not be obvious at first glance. –  PointedEars Jan 11 '12 at 19:46
add comment

11 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted
+100

You can quickly achieve this effect using a mixture of float and overflow: hidden:

<ul>
    <li>
        <input class="btn" type="button" value="Submit"/>
        <div class="inputbox"><input id="textField" type="text" /></div>
    </li>
</ul>

CSS:

ul { 
  list-style: none; 
  padding: 0; }
.btn { float: right; }
.inputbox { 
  padding: 0 5px 0 0;
  overflow: hidden; }
.inputbox input { 
  width: 100%;
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
  -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
  box-sizing: border-box; }

Preview (with box-sizing): http://jsfiddle.net/Wexcode/E8uHf/546/

Here is how it looks without box-sizing: http://jsfiddle.net/Wexcode/E8uHf/

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5  
This works great, but changes the HTML order, which changes the keyboard tab order, which will confuse many keyboard users when the button gets focused before the text input. –  Doug Jan 9 '12 at 14:54
2  
Couldn't you just use tabindex to correct any tab ordering problems? –  Jonah Bishop Jan 9 '12 at 15:18
3  
That could help, but keep in mind that tabindex overrides tab order for the whole document, not just the form. That is, any element with a positive tabindex will be moved to the front of the tab order and navigated to before any other element on the page. w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html#adef-tabindex –  Doug Jan 9 '12 at 16:29
3  
For your average form, setting the tab order isn't too onerous. This solution is pretty solid. –  Ryley Jan 10 '12 at 22:08
1  
Just a note: this is called a block formatting context, take another look at a similar problem here. stackoverflow.com/questions/1260122/… –  Roger Oct 4 '12 at 1:52
show 4 more comments

Try this:

HTML

<ul>
  <li>
    <input id="textField" type="text" /><input value="Button!" class="btn"type="button" />
  </li>
</ul>

CSS

ul li {
    width:100%;
}

#textField, .btn {
    float:left;
}

#textField {
    width:70%;
}

.btn {
    width:auto;
}

Here is a demo:

http://jsfiddle.net/andresilich/RkCvf/


Here are a couple of more demos i made for your consideration.

This demo is using CSS3's flex-box model to stretch the input field across its region without a given width. There is no support for IE8 and below though.


And this demo imitates a table by only using CSS. It is supported by IE8 and above.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to give #textField a set width; I want it to stretch. For example, if li's width is 100px, and button's computed width is 30px, #textField would be 70px; and when button's computed width becomes 40px, #textField would change to 60px. –  William Niu Jan 5 '12 at 4:18
3  
@WilliamNiu Are you ok with CSS3's flex-box? here is a demo: jsfiddle.net/andresilich/NFEab –  Andres Ilich Jan 5 '12 at 4:36
    
This seems like a nice alternative, but IE doesn't seem to support it... :-/ –  William Niu Jan 5 '12 at 5:24
1  
How far back are you supporting IE? There is the display:table-cell property that can be used to get the end result as well, it is supported by IE8+ though. –  Andres Ilich Jan 5 '12 at 12:30
    
Another nice suggestion yet! Why don't you put the two suggestions in your answer? I'm quite willing to at least upvote this answer. –  William Niu Jan 5 '12 at 15:44
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This is possible with CSS in user agents with CSS-2.x-supporting layout engines:

  …
  <style type="text/css">
    .full-width {
      width: 100%;
    }

    .table {
      display: table;
    }

    .row {
      display: table-row;
    }

    .cell {
      display: table-cell;
    }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <ul class="table">
    <li class="row">
      <span class="cell full-width">
        <input type="text" id="textField" class="full-width" />
      </span>
      <span class="cell">
        <input type="button" value="foobar" />
      </span>
    </li>
  </ul>
</body>

Tested positive in the following browsers:

  • Chromium 16.0.912.75 (Developer Build 116452 Linux), Apple WebCore 535.7
  • Chromium 16.0.912.63 (Developer Build 113337 Linux), Apple WebCore 535.1

Please note that paddings and margins on input elements will interfere because of the fixed width.

But: I can see no good reason why you should not use a table element here (tables and CSS do mix). Semantically it would make sense (the table would be serializable), and compatibility will be very likely better than with the CSS display property values above:

<body>
  <ul>
    <li>
      <table class="full-width"
             summary="Input text field with &#8220;foobar&#8221; button">
        <tr>
          <td class="full-width">
            <input type="text" id="textField" class="full-width" />
          </td>
          <td>
            <input type="button" value="foobar" />
          </td>
        </tr>
      </table>
    </li>
  </ul>
</body>

It is also possible that you should have used only a table element here in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
Care to explain why this was voted down? :-( It works! –  PointedEars Jan 11 '12 at 9:59
    
Not the downvoter, but I'm guessing it's because you're still using tables for layout, despite styling them. CSS purists really don't like that. –  insta Jan 11 '12 at 16:57
    
Then maybe that person, too, has not really read the answer because I am not using a table element in the solution. The second variant is only an alternative. –  PointedEars Jan 11 '12 at 19:39
    
Preaching to the choir, have an upvote for two alternative viable solutions. –  insta Jan 11 '12 at 23:23
1  
The reason you shouldn't use a table is that the form data is not tabular. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 12 '12 at 17:37
show 1 more comment

I ended up using a table and stretch the cell that contains the text field:

<ul>
  <li>
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td width="100%"><input width="100%" id="textField" type="text" /></td>
        <td><input type="button" width="auto" /></td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
4  
no no no no no!!1 :( These kinds of solutions make me cry :( –  Stephan Muller Sep 10 '10 at 8:20
2  
Do you have a better suggestion, Litso? –  William Niu Sep 10 '10 at 8:41
1  
For starters, CSS has several different values for the 'display' property that do the same thing as table elements. w3.org/tr/css21/visuren.html#propdef-display –  reisio Jan 6 '12 at 1:26
3  
I don't think rejecting table-based solutions just because they use a table is instantly correct. They sometimes have a place. None of the other presented solutions are as simple as this one. –  Ryley Jan 10 '12 at 22:11
    
I do. Using a table in this manner undermines HTML's entire purpose. –  reisio Jan 10 '12 at 23:09
add comment

How about this?

<ul>
  <li>
    <input id='textField' style='width: 80%'/><input type='button' style='width: 20%'/>
  </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to explicitly set the width for any of them. –  William Niu Sep 10 '10 at 8:09
add comment
<ul>
  <li style="position:relative; width:100%;">
    <input id="textField" type="text" style="position:absolute; left:0px; right:80px" />
    <input type="button" value="Submit" style="position:absolute; right:0; width:auto" />
  </li>
</ul>

Adjust right:80px to set margin between textbox and button;

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea, but that didn't work. When you make an element position absolute, you need to explicitly set the position and size, which isn't what I want. I want the text field to be resizable. –  William Niu Sep 10 '10 at 8:08
    
I defined left and right to make it anchored to its container (must have position:relative) not to define its size, it is resizable. –  Jeaffrey Gilbert Sep 10 '10 at 8:31
    
First of all, for some reason the right property doesn't work for me (in Safari). Secondly, I don't want to define the right property, as I would like it to automatically adjust with the button to the right. –  William Niu Sep 13 '10 at 0:31
add comment

Do it per javascript. take width of li minus length of button and set the width of the textbox to this. But keep the boxmodel in mind. Without javascript I have not really an idea.

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add comment

Tables and positioning are not required at all. The answer is to float one element left, and the other right.

http://jsfiddle.net/johnallan/HeUSN/

HTML:

<ul>
<li class="media attribution">
<button class="button" >Press Me</button>
<div class="copy">b blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blah  blah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blah blah blah blahlah blah blah</div>
</li>
</ul>

CSS:

.media{ border:1px solid black }
.media, .copy{overflow:hidden; _overflow:visible; zoom:1;}
.media .button{float:left; margin-right: 10px;}
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Maybe this can help, if you can define maxlength on the input box:

/* CSS */

ul{ 
    float:left; 
    border:1px solid #000; 
    padding:0; 
    position:relative; 
    width:20%; 
    height:25px; 
}

ul li{ 
    float:left; 
    margin:0; 
    padding:0; 
    border:0; 
    list-style-type:none; 
    width:100%; height:100%; 
    position:relative; 
}

ul li input{ 
    margin:0; padding:0; border:0; 
}

ul li input[type='text']{ 
    float:left; 
    width:100%; height:100%; 
    text-indent:10px;  
}

ul li input[type='submit']{  
    position:absolute; right:0; 
    width:auto; height:100%; 
}

/* HTML */

<body>

    <ul>
        <li>
            <input type="text" /><input type="submit" value="Submit" />
        </li>
    </ul>

</body>

The code basically keeps the input[type='text'] to a width of 100% and positions the button absolute to the parent li. This width of the button is auto and the height is 100% to cover up the textbox. You can then set a maxlength on the textbox to prevent the text from being hidden by the button.

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Anything too long in your text input gets cut off by the submit button. –  Wex Jan 7 '12 at 20:55
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/* ROBOTICCSS*/
/*  test in ff - works*/

ul{
width: auto;
padding: 0 80px 0 0;/* right padding >= button width */
list-style:none;
}

input.text_area{
width: 100%;
}

input.submit_button{
float: right;
margin: 0 -80px 0 0;/* match above value */
}
<!--HTML -->
<ul>
  <li>
      <input class="text_area" type="text" />
      <input class="submit_button" type="button" value="Submit"/>
  </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stackoverflow. Thanks for the solution, we will appreciate it even more if you can add a little bit of description about the code you are posting. Thanks. –  Vivek Oct 28 '12 at 14:08
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This is pretty close to the desired result:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<style>
li { width: 100%; border: 1px solid black; display: block; text-align: justify; }
span { display: inline-block; }
span { width: 100%; }
#foo { display: inline-block; width: 90%; border: 1px solid red; }
#foo input { display: block; width: 100%; }
</style>
</head>

<ul>
  <li>
    <object id="foo"><input type="text"></object> <object><input type="button" value="1234567890"></object>
      <span></span>
  </li>
</ul>

</html>
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