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i wonder if there is a simple way to remove already registered types from a unity container or at least replace existing Interface/Type mappings with another one. is it enough to just map another class type to an interface and the old one is overwritten?


this should not happen very often. actually hardly any time, but there are situations were i want to replace a service implemeting some interface with another without having the other parts disturbed.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Listening to the webcast (see msdn webcasts search for unity) it replaces registered types in a last in wins scenario. So if you use config to load your container, then use code to register the same type the code one wins (the reverse also true btw).

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is this also true if i register types only in code? –  Joachim Kerschbaumer Feb 25 '09 at 12:47

With Unity 2, if you're trying to replace one registration with another you'll need to specify both the From type and To type in the new registration if they were included in the original registration.

For example, if you have:


public interface IService
{
    void DoSomething();
}

public class SomeService : IService
{
    public void DoSomething();
}

public class AnotherService : IService
{
    public void DoSomething();
}

and you register SomeService as:


container.RegisterType<IService, SomeService>();

then if another part of your system wants to override the IService registration to resolve an AnotherService you'll need to register it as:


container.RegisterType<IService, AnotherService>();

That seems pretty straightforward, but I got hung up on it when AnotherService needed to be created by a factory:


container.RegisterType<IService>(new InjectionFactory(x =>
{
    // this would be some complicated procedure
    return new AnotherService();
}));

In this case you'll still get SomeService. To get AnotherService like you'd expect you need to specify the TTo type:


container.RegisterType<IService, AnotherService>(new InjectionFactory(x =>
{
    return new AnotherService();
}));
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What if you're trying to replace a previous .RegisterType<IService, SomeService> with a factory that returns an IService that could be of multiple types? I'm seeing that .RegisterType<IService>(new InjectionFactory(...)) is not replacing the previous registration. –  Jacob Oct 5 '12 at 0:22
1  
Success... .RegisterType<IService, IService>(new InjectionFactory(...)) works. –  Jacob Nov 2 '12 at 23:16
    
Thanks @Jacob, this is very important bit. I wonder why the RegisterType<T> does not do the exact same thing in this case as RegisterType<T,T>.. odd. –  quetzalcoatl Jan 23 '13 at 11:38

I haven't checked out Unity, so I might be wrong, but I imagine it's not possible what you're trying to do, as with my work on our own DI feature in our framework it turned out to be much more efficient to do the discovery of types first, then let the app run because you then don't have to lock the type store for every access to see which instances to inject into the instance, as the store is readonly, it's never mutated.

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You could always just recreate the container and register the new types. This is most likely fairly costly to do so if you'd need to do this over and over again I think you might need to reconsider your framework design.

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