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In AS3 I believe you should initialise all variables outside loops for increased performance. Is this the case with JavaScript as well? Which is better / faster / best-practice?

var value = 0;

for (var i; i < 100; i++)
{
    value = somearray[i];
}

or

for (var i; i < 100; i++)
{
    var value = somearray[i];
}
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5  
Outside! always outside. –  BGerrissen Sep 10 '10 at 13:27
11  
Hmm, don't variable declarations get pushed up to function scope anyway in both Javascript and AS3? If I'm correct, then it really doesn't matter. –  spender Sep 10 '10 at 13:29
3  
@Andy - did you try assigning before declaring in a function body? Perhaps your preconceptions are leading you astray. WRT performance, with push-up scoping, if the JS is interpretted, then it will chew extra cycles within a loop block. If compiled (which most engines do nowdays) it won't matter. –  spender Sep 10 '10 at 13:38
    
@spender: you are correct :-) –  Andy E Sep 10 '10 at 13:43
1  
Great question! Thanks. After reading all the answers, I believe if its just a small loop or only a temp variable I will keep them where they are needed and it doesn't effect performance. If a var is used within a function more than once, why not refer to it inside the function and finally globals then can be sat outside the fn() –  Dean Meehan Feb 26 at 11:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 108 down vote accepted

There is absolutely no difference in meaning or performance, in JavaScript or ActionScript.

var is a directive for the parser, and not a command executed at run-time. If a particular identifier has been declared var once or more anywhere in a function body(*), then all use of that identifier in the block will be referring to the local variable. It makes no difference whether value is declared to be var inside the loop, outside the loop, or both.

Consequently you should write whichever you find most readable. I disagree with Crockford that putting all the vars at the top of a function is always the best thing. For the case where a variable is used temporarily in a section of code, it's better to declare var in that section, so the section stands alone and can be copy-pasted. Otherwise, copy-paste a few lines of code to a new function during refactoring, without separately picking out and moving the associated var, and you've got yourself an accidental global.

In particular:

for (var i; i<100; i++)
    do something;

for (var i; i<100; i++)
    do something else;

Crockford will recommend you remove the second var (or remove both vars and do var i; above), and jslint will whinge at you for this. But IMO it's more maintainable to keep both vars, keeping all the related code together, instead of having an extra, easily-forgotten bit of code at the top of the function.

Personally I tend to declare as var the first assignment of a variable in an independent section of code, whether or not there's another separate usage of the same variable name in some other part of the same function. For me, having to declare var at all is an undesirable JS wart (it would have been better to have variables default to local); I don't see it as my duty to duplicate the limitations of [an old revision of] ANSI C in JavaScript as well.

(*: other than in nested function bodies)

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3  
I still can't decide if I'm with Crockford or not on this one. Declaring variables inside blocks feels a bit like using conditional function statements (which is naughty)... However, I agree with your points as well :) #confused –  Daniel Vassallo Sep 10 '10 at 13:53
10  
+1 I disagree with Crockford's reasoning (quoted in Daniel's answer), as JavaScript developers we shouldn't be writing code so that other "C family" programmers can understand it. I often use var inside if blocks and loops because it makes more sense to me. –  Andy E Sep 10 '10 at 13:53
2  
-1 The OP is asking if vars in the body of the loop should be declared before the loop begins. The index value of the loop is clearly a special case (and is hoisted) and doesn't not help the OP at all. –  mkoistinen Sep 10 '10 at 14:13
13  
Loop indexes aren't a special case, they're handled and hoisted in exactly the same way as a normal assignment. –  bobince Sep 10 '10 at 14:31
20  
+1 Crockford is wrong about this one (and others, but I digress). Requiring that var is only used at the top of a function is just asking for accidental global variable creation. And having a mass of unrelated variables all declared in one spot is semantically meaningless, especially when some of those variables may end up never being used. –  MooGoo Sep 10 '10 at 14:39

JavaScript is a language written at the bottom by C or C++, I'm not very sure which one it is. And one of its purpose is saving the lavour of handling internal memory. Even in C or C++, you won't have to worry about whether it will consume a lot of resources when variables are declared inside a loop. Why should you worry about it in JavaScript?

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for (var i : someArray) {
    var q = i;
}

This is a for each statement, so essentially, it means "While the variable i is in someArray, this loop will run, and the variable i can be called within the loop.

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1  
Sorry, but what does this have to do with the original question, which was about variables within a loop, and not loop semantics? –  freefaller Oct 27 at 20:55

In theory it shouldn't make any difference in JavaScript, since the language does not have block scope, but only function scope.

I'm not sure about the performance argument, but Douglas Crockford still recommends that the var statements should be the first statements in the function body. Quoting from Code Conventions for the JavaScript Programming Language:

JavaScript does not have block scope, so defining variables in blocks can confuse programmers who are experienced with other C family languages. Define all variables at the top of the function.

I think he has a point, as you can see in the following example. Declaring the variables at the top of the function should not confuse readers into thinking that the variable i is held in the scope of the for loop block:

function myFunction() {
  var i;    // the scope of the variables is very clear

  for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    // ...
  }
}
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4  
+1 for telling OP truths about JS scope. I'm wondering whether to downvote answers that say otherwise! –  spender Sep 10 '10 at 13:30
1  
@Kieranmaine: I didn't say it doesn't affect performance. I just made an argument for putting them outside the loops, irrelevant of performance.... I don't have any references for the performance arguments, but you didn't cite any in your answer either :) –  Daniel Vassallo Sep 10 '10 at 13:34
1  
@Kieranmaine: do you have a source for that? –  Andy E Sep 10 '10 at 13:34
3  
@Kieranmaine: AFAIK even if you declare variables inside of a loop, ecma- / javascript will bump those up at runtime. That is called "Hoisting". So there should not be any difference. –  jAndy Sep 10 '10 at 13:38
    
I'd +1 again for such a controversial answer. Well done! –  spender Sep 10 '10 at 13:42

I just did a simple test in Chrome

  var count = 100000000;
    var a = 0;
    console.log(new Date());

    for (var i=0; i<count; i++) {
      a = a + 1
    }

    console.log(new Date());

    var j;
    for (j=0; j<count; j++) {
      a = a + 1;
    }

    console.log(new Date());

    var j;
    for (j=0; j<count; j++) {
        var x;
        x = x + 1;
    }

    console.log(new Date());

Result is that the last test takes ~8 seconds and the previous 2 are only ~2 seconds. Very repeatably and regardless of order.

So, this proves to me, that one should always declare the vars outside of the loop. Curious case to me is the first one where I declare i in the for() statement. This one appears to be just as fast as the 2nd test where I pre-declare the index.

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6  
@KP: results are only proven if you test them yourself or if a large number of people verify them. @mkoistinen: I constructed a fairer test, jsfiddle.net/GM8nk. After running the script a several times in Chrome 5, I could see that there was no consistent winner. All three variations performed better than the others after a few refreshes. -1 from me, I'm afraid. Note, you might want to run this one in other browsers. IE and Fx didn't like 100 million iterations. –  Andy E Sep 10 '10 at 14:46
1  
@AndyE. Wow, so based on this simply test, IE sucks 100X more? =) –  mkoistinen Sep 10 '10 at 15:21
2  
Results are all over the place for me, no clear cross-browser winner though there are sometimes significant speed differences. Weird. I think Andy's fiddle is a better test though, putting each candidate in its own function... certainly if the original script is run outside of a function, it shouldn't really be testing anything as the var is declaring as global a variable that would be global anyway. –  bobince Sep 10 '10 at 20:20
4  
Over a year after the fact, but SHAPOW –  sdleihssirhc Dec 9 '11 at 6:37
1  
This isn't mine, but I figured some of you would be interested: jsperf.com/var-in-for-loop –  m1. Jul 12 '12 at 17:28

The ECMA-/Javascript language hoists any variable which is declared anywhere to the top of a function. That is because this language does have function scope and does not have block scope like many other C-like languages.
That is also known as lexical scope.

If you declare something like

var foo = function(){
    for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++){
    }
};

This gets hoisted to:

var foo = function(){
    var i;
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
    }
}

So it does not make any difference in performance (But correct me if I'm totally wrong here).
A much better argument for not declaring a variable somewhere else than at the top of a function is readability. Declaring a variable within a for-loop might lead to the wrong assumption that this variable can only be accessed within the loop body, which is totally wrong. Infact you can access that variable anywhere within the current scope.

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+1 informative! –  mkoistinen Sep 10 '10 at 14:14

Next year, all browsers will have JS engines that precompile the code so the performance difference (which comes from parsing the same block of code again and again plus executing the assignment) should become negligible.

Also, never optimize for performance unless you have to. Keeping variables close to the place where you need them the first time keeps your code clean. On the negative side, people who are used to languages with block scopes might be confused.

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Well, that depends on what you're trying to achieve... if value suppose to be only a temporary variable inside loop block then it's much clearer to use second form. It's also more logical and verbose.

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I have found that the pushing all variable declaration to the top - including temporary variables - can actually lead to confusion as it just gets 'noisy'. –  Daniel Sokolowski May 21 at 16:17

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