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I've encountered a strange feature (that may be related to SQL Management Studio) with regard to the placement of return characters at the end of SQL Statements. Whilst the query runs just fine within the ID, the feature in question was breaking our deployment scripts.

Essentially, for some reason, certain lines were being terminated by what looked like a Carriage Return (CR) instead of a CRLF, as can be seen in the diff between two files below:

alt text

Now I know how to modify the build scripts to catch this, but I was curious as to how this was being caused. How on earth would a CR character be used in place of a CRLF character?

Thougts anyone?

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ANSI -> Unicode conversion? UNIX -> Windows conversion? Chances are, you edited it in another editor and saved it and it saved in a UNIX format, for example. –  Denis Valeev Sep 10 '10 at 13:30
    
Maybe, I suppose it could have been copied/pasted from a unicode formatted file. Its a pretty standard header, so it's a distinct possibility. I'd have accepted that as an answer if it wasn't a comment :-) –  James Wiseman Sep 10 '10 at 13:37
    
I think Denis could be right - I had similar issues myself whereby deployment scripts would fall over, seemingly for no reason and always turned out to be the .sql file had been edited in a different editor and been saved in a different encoding –  AdaTheDev Sep 10 '10 at 13:39
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ANSI -> Unicode conversion? UNIX -> Windows conversion? Chances are, you edited it in another editor and saved it and it saved in a UNIX format, for example.

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Cheers. Good answer. –  James Wiseman Sep 10 '10 at 13:46
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This is exactly what happened to me today and after a little investigating I found a few details:

I was using a different editor to my usual one on colleague's machine. I'm used to EditPlus and this was Notepad++ (i think). After a little editing I copied some code into MSSMS, then a bit more editing, then saved as .sql file. Then sometime later when opening the file I got the warning about cr/lf issue. After making the whitespace chars visible I noticed that most lines were cr/lf but just a few were lf only.

Turns out that while I was in Notepad++ I did a search and replace on "><" with ">\n<" (separate html tags into new lines) and in Notepad++ "\n" means "lf" whereas in editplus "\n" means "newline" (whatever your file is currently using, so normally "crlf").

Interestingly MSSMS allowed me to save this hybrid file without any complaints.

So, the lesson is when doing search and replace using regex-like expressions, common things like \n may be implemented differently in different editors

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