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bool foo = true;

// Do this?
if (foo)
{
}

// Or this?
if (foo == true)
{
}

I like one of them and my coworker the other. The result is the same, but what is (more) correct?

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closed as not constructive by Robaticus, John Gietzen, Piskvor, Neil Knight, BoltClock Sep 10 '10 at 13:44

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It's a matter of style. I doubt you'll get a definitive answer on this one. –  Robaticus Sep 10 '10 at 13:39
    
I wish I could vote to close as general duplicate. There are waaaaaaay too many questions on this and they are all equally subjective. –  BoltClock Sep 10 '10 at 13:42
7  
Jon Skeet likes the first one. Thus, it is the correct way...end of discussion! ;-) –  A. Levy Sep 10 '10 at 13:46
    
A definite answer is not necessary. Just wanted a discussion about it :) –  Palpie Sep 13 '10 at 6:09
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8 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Almost everyone I've seen expressing an opinion prefers

if (foo)
{
}

Indeed, I've seen many people criticize the explicit comparison, and I may even have done so myself before now. I'd say the "short" style is idiomatic.

EDIT:

Note that this doesn't mean that line of code is always incorrect. Consider:

bool? maybeFoo = GetSomeNullableBooleanValue();
if (maybeFoo == true)
{
    ...
}

That will compile, but without the "== true" it won't, as there's no implicit conversion from bool? to bool.

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3  
Agreed. The only time I'd use the verbose (foo == true) is if the foo variable name is not obviously a boolean, just for readability. –  Andy May Sep 10 '10 at 13:45
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It depends on your situation.

I would say, if your bool has a good name, then:

if (control.IsEnabled)  // Read "If control is enabled."
{
}

would be preferred.

If, however, the variable has a not-so-obvious name, checking against true would be helpful in understanding the logic.

if (first == true)  // Read "If first is true."
{
}
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4  
+1 readability should guide the answer - ideally you would rename the variable so you can use the former. –  RedFilter Sep 10 '10 at 13:41
11  
If the name isn't obvious, perhaps it should be renamed... –  Rowland Shaw Sep 10 '10 at 13:42
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If you're going to opt for

if(foo == true)

why not go all the way and do

if(foo == true == true == true == true == true == true == true == true == true)

Which is the same thing.

I disagree that if its clearly named (ie: IsSomething) then its ok to not compare to true, but otherwise you should. If its in an if statement obviously it can be compared to true.

if(monday)

Is just as descriptive as

if(monday == true)

I also prefer the same standard for not:

if(!monday)

as opposed to

if(monday == false)
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The first example nearly always wins in my book:

if(foo)
{
}

It's shorter and more concise. Why add an extra check to something when it's absolutely not needed? Just wasting cycles...

I do agree, though, that sometimes the more verbose syntax makes things more readable (which is ultimately more important as long as performance is acceptable) in situations where variables are poorly named.

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Both are correct.

You probably have some coding standard in your company - just see to follow it through. If you don't have - you should :)

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1  
A coding standard that legislates stuff like this is an "organizational smell" –  Steve Townsend Sep 10 '10 at 13:41
1  
Coding standards with this level of micro-management annoy me. –  RedFilter Sep 10 '10 at 13:43
1  
@Steve Townsend: On the other hand, ten different coding styles in one file is a "(dis)organizational stench" and hard to read. –  Piskvor Sep 10 '10 at 13:44
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i personally would prefer

if(true == foo)
{
}

there is no chance for the ==/= mistype and i find it more expressive in terms of foo's type. But it is a very subjective question.

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But this is C# and if (foo = true) will generate a compile time error. –  ChrisF Sep 10 '10 at 13:42
3  
@ChrisF: No it won't. The result of "foo = true" is still a bool, so it's fine for the "if" condition. It does generate a warning in the MS compiler, however. –  Jon Skeet Sep 10 '10 at 13:43
    
Why stop here when you could do "if (true == (true == (true == foo)))"? Wouldn't this be much more expressive? ;) –  Henrik Sep 10 '10 at 13:44
1  
@MrDosu: I'm strongly in favour of abandoning habits from other languages if they don't have any real justification in your new language. –  Jon Skeet Sep 10 '10 at 13:47
1  
@MrDosu: Commutativity says nothing about readability, which is very important to me. –  Jon Skeet Sep 10 '10 at 14:17
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First one is better of course. It is faster and it is more elegant. bool variable is bool expression itself.

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1  
Faster? You mean for typing? –  Steve Townsend Sep 10 '10 at 13:41
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Neither is "more correct". My personal preference is for the more concise form but either is fine. To me, life is too short to even think about arguing the toss over stuff like this.

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