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Hey guys, I'm migrating from Java to C# now that I've realized I prefer the C# language features over the ones in Java, but I have this small issue. In MySQL Connector/J and JDBC, I believe that one of my applications allowed multiple PreparedStatements to be executed while another one is open, like I could perform a query that returns a ResultSet and while that ResultSet is still open, I could open another PreparedStatement and get another ResultSet or I could just execute an update, based on the data I got from my first ResultSet (i.e., insert a salt value and update the password column with a SHA512 hash when I realize that the row has a plaintext password in the password column).

However, with Connector/NET, I've come to realize whenever I try doing this, I get this error: MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlException: There is already an open DataReader associated with this Connection which must be closed first.

Is there a easy way to fix this error, maybe any other implementations of a MySQL to .NET bridge? I don't really want to create a lot of DB connections in one application, although I might want to create one for every thread in my application (as in a ThreadLocal). A ThreadLocal DB connection will help when I perform two queries at the same time in two different methods, but obviously I cannot separate these two commands into different threads and I don't want to create excess threads.

By the way, here's the code itself. Yes, I can move the update code down to after I close the reader, but I have many more similar methods and some of them are more difficult to fix up than this one:

MySqlConnection con = DatabaseConnection.GetConnection();
MySqlCommand cmd = con.CreateCommand();
cmd.CommandText = "SELECT `id`,`password`,`salt`,`pin`,`gender`,`birthday` FROM `accounts` WHERE `name` = '" + AccountName + "'";
MySqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
if (reader.Read())
{
    AccountId = reader.GetInt32(0);
    string passhash = !reader.IsDBNull(1) ? reader.GetString(1) : null;
    string salt = !reader.IsDBNull(2) ? reader.GetString(2) : null;
    m_pin = !reader.IsDBNull(3) ? reader.GetString(3) : null;
    Gender = !reader.IsDBNull(4) ? reader.GetByte(4) : WvsCommon.Gender.UNDEFINED;
    m_birthday = !reader.IsDBNull(5) ? reader.GetInt32(5) : 0;
    if (!HashFunctions.HashEquals(pwd, HashAlgorithms.SHA512, passhash + salt))
    {
        if (passhash == pwd || salt == null && HashFunctions.HashEquals(pwd, HashAlgorithms.SHA1, passhash))
        {
            salt = HashFunctions.GenerateSalt();
            passhash = HashFunctions.GenerateSaltedSha512Hash(pwd, salt);
            MySqlCommand update = con.CreateCommand();
            update.CommandText = "UPDATE `accounts` SET `password` = '" + passhash + "', `salt` = '" + salt + "' WHERE `id` = " + AccountId;
            update.ExecuteNonQuery();
            update.Dispose();
        }
    }
}
reader.Close();
cmd.Dispose();

If moving the update code is the only possibility, or if it's the best one, I suppose I'll have to make do with it, but I want to get more ideas on other possibilities first and then pick an option.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, and I bet that's the case as well in the java world.

The connection is being actively used/hold to retrieve that data, if that worked in the java world is because it did one of:

  • read/cached the whole result set
  • did it in a separate connection behind the scenes

I don't see much on an issue, you just have to move the reader.Close to the appropriate place in your code. That said, you should go through that code anyway, as your dispose/close calls won't be correctly called if an exception occurs. Use the using statement to ensure everything is freed appropriately, below a modified version of your code with these changes (and a couple others that make it be less deep to the right):

using(MySqlConnection con = DatabaseConnection.GetConnection())
using(MySqlCommand cmd = con.CreateCommand())
{
    cmd.CommandText = "SELECT `id`,`password`,`salt`,`pin`,`gender`,`birthday` FROM `accounts` WHERE `name` = '" + AccountName + "'";
    using(MySqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
    {
        if(!reader.Read()) return;
        AccountId = reader.GetInt32(0);
        string passhash = !reader.IsDBNull(1) ? reader.GetString(1) : null;
        string salt = !reader.IsDBNull(2) ? reader.GetString(2) : null;
        m_pin = !reader.IsDBNull(3) ? reader.GetString(3) : null;
        Gender = !reader.IsDBNull(4) ? reader.GetByte(4) : WvsCommon.Gender.UNDEFINED;
        m_birthday = !reader.IsDBNull(5) ? reader.GetInt32(5) : 0;
        reader.Close();
        if (HashFunctions.HashEquals(pwd, HashAlgorithms.SHA512, passhash + salt))
            return;
        if(passhash != pwd && !(salt == null && HashFunctions.HashEquals(pwd, HashAlgorithms.SHA1, passhash)))
            return;
        salt = HashFunctions.GenerateSalt();
        passhash = HashFunctions.GenerateSaltedSha512Hash(pwd, salt);
        using(MySqlCommand update = con.CreateCommand())
        {
           update.CommandText = "UPDATE `accounts` SET `password` = '" + passhash + "', `salt` = '" + salt + "' WHERE `id` = " + AccountId;
           update.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just a quick newbie question, if reader.Read() returns false, then we don't have to do a reader.Close() on it? –  Kevin Jin Sep 12 '10 at 15:56
    
@Kevin the Close happens automatically because of the reader's Dispose that's called with the using statement --- depending on how you structure the code, you don't need to call that explicitly. –  eglasius Sep 12 '10 at 16:00
    
Okay, thank you! I think I got a better understanding of MySQL Connector/NET thanks to this. I suppose that JDBC's ResultSet is really just a table that stores all the data and then closes the PreparedStatement so that other queries and non-queries could be executed right afterwards, that's pretty much the only explanation. –  Kevin Jin Sep 12 '10 at 16:24
    
@Kevin in that case equivalent would be data sets + data adapter. Although nowadays entity framework can give you either functionality / process as you read or read all --- along with many many other features. –  eglasius Sep 13 '10 at 3:46

Alright guys, with a bit more of research, I realized I was wrong. Java's ResultSets do in fact hold an active connection to the database, as evidenced by this page: www.geekinterview.com/question_details/591

ResultSets must be connected so that the ResultSet.next() method works properly to fetch the next row from the database. Note that this does not mean that the connection is busy servicing the ResultSet, but instead the ResultSet only holds on to the connection so that it could move forward when given the command to.

Apparently SQL server has something similar to this that allows you to open multiple read-only, forward-only queries while another is open on the same connection, called MARS (Multiple Active Result Sets). http://www.codeguru.com/csharp/csharp/cs_network/database/article.php/c8715

With a little bit more research, I realized MySQL Connector/NET does not support this feature. It's too bad because I believe it makes more sense than the current implementation, at least for migrating Java developers.

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From MSDN

While the SqlDataReader is being used, the associated SqlConnection is busy serving the SqlDataReader, and no other operations can be performed on the SqlConnection other than closing it. This is the case until the Close method of the SqlDataReader is called. For example, you cannot retrieve output parameters until after you call Close

What I typically do to resolve this is to nest my connections I need so that when I the first using closes all the other connections are disposed.

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For some reason, it takes me a full second to establish a connection to my MySQL database, unless I'm doing the thing completely wrong. The thing is, I'm trying to create a server that I want to try keeping in real time with my clients, and one second is quite a huge amount of time. JDBC seems to establish a connection on average around 250ms the first time for each thread. –  Kevin Jin Sep 12 '10 at 15:42
    
Nevermind, it seems as though each subsequent new connection to the database after the first seems to go much faster. I tried this by making the database connection ThreadStatic, then executing a new thread with a MySQL update while another thread had a Reader still open. No problems, and I'm measuring 11ms. –  Kevin Jin Sep 12 '10 at 16:28

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