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Which are, for every of the following methodology to implement an interface listeners, the pros and cons:

1) into the main class as:

class MyClass implements ActionListener {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        // ...
    }

    component.addActionListener(this);
}

2) as an inner class as

class MyClass {
    private class MyActionListener implements ActionListener {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            // ...
        }
    }

    MyActionListener mal = new MyActionListener();
    component.addActionListener(mal);
}

3) as an anonymous inner class as

class MyClass {
    component.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            // ...
        }
    });
}
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2  
The biggest difference is in the first implementation. You are exposing actionPerformed to the world (since it's directly on your public class) rather than hiding it inside via one of the other two options you mention. 2) and 3) is purely a style choice. –  Kirk Woll Sep 10 '10 at 14:33
    
@Kirk: Not purely style, there's a reuse aspect, but yeah it's close. Spot on otherwise. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 10 '10 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

Implementing callback interfaces to existing classes is pure evil. Obviously. Just don't do it. Ever.

Non-local inner classes are a bit on the pointless side. You can use them with inheritance, they can have multiple constructors, they do have a name, etc. If you have those sort of requirements, then you really should be looking new outer classes.

Anonymous inner classes are relatively concise. They remove the need to add fields and constructors to copy fields. The temptation some people feel to make local variables fields in the "main" class vanishes. You can just make local variables from the enclosing method final. "Reuse" can be achieved through bog standard programming, without having to resort to introducing more named classes.

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If your main class doesn't have some reason for exposing ActionListener functionality outside of itself, then it's an implementation detail and you don't want to go with #1. #1 locks you into providing that interface.

You'll see a lot of #3, but I have never been a fan. If you do that, you can't reuse that ActionListener implementation anywhere else.

For that reason, I'd go either with #2 or with the one you didn't mention, which is making a package-level class that does the implementation (which allows you to reuse it elsewhere).

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In addition to the issues of interface and re-use mentioned by others, consider readability. The third can reduce readability if the implementation of actionPerformed() is long.

Also, #2 allows your inner class to have a constructor with arguments, and include fields, should those not already be available from the containing top-level class.

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An anonymous inner class (3) can only be used for one component and I normaly use this to delegate to a protected method in the outer class without the Event parameter.

(1) and (2) allows to reuse the Listener instance for multiple components but then one needs to find out via the Event object the source component.

So it's up to the task to pick between (1)/(2) or (3).

Greetz, GHad

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Nonsense. [chars] –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 10 '10 at 14:38
    
Thank you Tom Hawtin for the detailed explanation. It was a pleasure to learn from your wisdom –  GHad Sep 10 '10 at 14:46

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