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I need to generate all combinations of size @k in a given set of size @n. Can someone please review the following SQL and determine first if the following logic is returning the expected results, and second if is there a better way?

/*CREATE FUNCTION dbo.Factorial ( @x int ) 
RETURNS int 
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @value int

    IF @x <= 1
        SET @value = 1
    ELSE
        SET @value = @x * dbo.Factorial( @x - 1 )

    RETURN @value
END
GO*/
SET NOCOUNT ON;
DECLARE @k int = 5, @n int;
DECLARE @set table ( [value] varchar(24) );
DECLARE @com table ( [index] int );

INSERT @set VALUES ('1'),('2'),('3'),('4'),('5'),('6');

SELECT @n = COUNT(*) FROM @set;

DECLARE @combinations int = dbo.Factorial(@n) / (dbo.Factorial(@k) * dbo.Factorial(@n - @k));

PRINT CAST(@combinations as varchar(max)) + ' combinations';

DECLARE @index int = 1;

WHILE @index <= @combinations
BEGIN
    INSERT @com VALUES (@index)
    SET @index = @index + 1
END;

WITH [set] as (
    SELECT 
        [value], 
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY [value] ) as [index]
    FROM @set
)
SELECT 
    [values].[value], 
    [index].[index] as [combination]
FROM [set] [values]
CROSS JOIN @com [index]
WHERE ([index].[index] + [values].[index] - 1) % (@n) BETWEEN 1 AND @k
ORDER BY
    [index].[index];
share|improve this question
    
It is very inefficient. Memoization of factorial results is one way. Calculating factorial in a CTE is a further improvement over function calls. Also, rewriting mathematical expression would be another improvement. –  Denis Valeev Sep 10 '10 at 17:45
    
Drop this exercise and create a CLR function that would get the job done. –  Denis Valeev Sep 10 '10 at 17:47
    
also, n!/(k!(n-k)!) = (n-k+1)(n-k+2)...n/(n-k)! –  Denis Valeev Sep 10 '10 at 17:51
    
I want the actual combinations though –  Dave Sep 10 '10 at 18:26
    
Using Denis's conversion, you can work with larger sets because calculating the factorial won't overflow as quickly. @Denis, check out my answer. :) –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 20:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Returning Combinations

Using a numbers table or number-generating CTE, select 0 through 2^n - 1. Using the bit positions containing 1s in these numbers to indicate the presence or absence of the relative members in the combination, and eliminating those that don't have the correct number of values, you should be able to return a result set with all the combinations you desire.

WITH Nums (Num) AS (
   SELECT Num
   FROM Numbers
   WHERE Num BETWEEN 0 AND POWER(2, @n) - 1
), BaseSet AS (
   SELECT ind = Power(2, Row_Number() OVER (ORDER BY Value) - 1), *
   FROM @set
), Combos AS (
   SELECT
      ComboID = N.Num,
      S.Value,
      Cnt = Count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY N.Num)
   FROM
      Nums N
      INNER JOIN BaseSet S ON N.Num & S.ind <> 0
)
SELECT
   ComboID,
   Value
FROM Combos
WHERE Cnt = @k
ORDER BY ComboID, Value;

This query performs pretty well, but I thought of a way to optimize it, cribbing from the Nifty Parallel Bit Count to first get the right number of items taken at a time. This performs 3 to 3.5 times faster (both CPU and time):

WITH Nums AS (
   SELECT Num, P1 = (Num & 0x55555555) + ((Num / 2) & 0x55555555)
   FROM dbo.Numbers
   WHERE Num BETWEEN 0 AND POWER(2, @n) - 1
), Nums2 AS (
   SELECT Num, P2 = (P1 & 0x33333333) + ((P1 / 4) & 0x33333333)
   FROM Nums
), Nums3 AS (
   SELECT Num, P3 = (P2 & 0x0f0f0f0f) + ((P2 / 16) & 0x0f0f0f0f)
   FROM Nums2
), BaseSet AS (
   SELECT ind = Power(2, Row_Number() OVER (ORDER BY Value) - 1), *
   FROM @set
)
SELECT
   ComboID = N.Num,
   S.Value
FROM
   Nums3 N
   INNER JOIN BaseSet S ON N.Num & S.ind <> 0
WHERE P3 % 255 = @k
ORDER BY ComboID, Value;

I went and read the bit-counting page and think that this could perform better if I don't do the % 255 but go all the way with bit arithmetic. When I get a chance I'll try that and see how it stacks up.

My performance claims are based on the queries run without the ORDER BY clause. For clarity, what this code is doing is counting the number of set 1-bits in Num from the Numbers table. That's because the number is being used as a sort of indexer to choose which elements of the set are in the current combination, so the number of 1-bits will be the same.

I hope you like it!

For the record, this technique of using the bit pattern of integers to select members of a set is what I've coined the "Vertical Cross Join." It effectively results in the cross join of multiple sets of data, where the number of sets & cross joins is arbitrary. Here, the number of sets is the number of items taken at a time.

Actually cross joining in the usual horizontal sense (of adding more columns to the existing list of columns with each join) would look something like this:

SELECT
   A.Value,
   B.Value,
   C.Value
FROM
   @Set A
   CROSS JOIN @Set B
   CROSS JOIN @Set C
WHERE
   A.Value = 'A'
   AND B.Value = 'B'
   AND C.Value = 'C'

My queries above effectively "cross join" as many times as necessary with only one join. The results are unpivoted compared to actual cross joins, sure, but that's a minor matter.

Critique of Your Code

First, may I suggest this change to your Factorial UDF:

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.Factorial (
   @x bigint
)
RETURNS bigint
AS
BEGIN
   IF @x <= 1 RETURN 1
   RETURN @x * dbo.Factorial(@x - 1)
END

Now you can calculate much larger sets of combinations, plus it's more efficient. You might even consider using decimal(38, 0) to allow larger intermediate calculations in your combination calculations.

Second, your given query does not return the correct results. For example, using my test data from the performance testing below, set 1 is the same as set 18. It looks like your query takes a sliding stripe that wraps around: each set is always 5 adjacent members, looking something like this (I pivoted to make it easier to see):

 1 ABCDE            
 2 ABCD            Q
 3 ABC            PQ
 4 AB            OPQ
 5 A            NOPQ
 6             MNOPQ
 7            LMNOP 
 8           KLMNO  
 9          JKLMN   
10         IJKLM    
11        HIJKL     
12       GHIJK      
13      FGHIJ       
14     EFGHI        
15    DEFGH         
16   CDEFG          
17  BCDEF           
18 ABCDE            
19 ABCD            Q

Compare the pattern from my queries:

 31 ABCDE  
 47 ABCD F 
 55 ABC EF 
 59 AB DEF 
 61 A CDEF 
 62  BCDEF 
 79 ABCD  G
 87 ABC E G
 91 AB DE G
 93 A CDE G
 94  BCDE G
103 ABC  FG
107 AB D FG
109 A CD FG
110  BCD FG
115 AB  EFG
117 A C EFG
118  BC EFG
121 A  DEFG
...

Just to drive the bit-pattern -> index of combination thing home for anyone interested, notice that 31 in binary = 11111 and the pattern is ABCDE. 121 in binary is 1111001 and the pattern is A__DEFG (backwards mapped).

Performance Results With A Real Numbers Table

I ran some performance testing with big sets on my second query above. I do not have a record at this time of the server version used. Here's my test data:

DECLARE
   @k int,
   @n int;

DECLARE @set TABLE (value varchar(24));
INSERT @set VALUES ('A'),('B'),('C'),('D'),('E'),('F'),('G'),('H'),('I'),('J'),('K'),('L'),('M'),('N'),('O'),('P'),('Q');
SET @n = @@RowCount;
SET @k = 5;

DECLARE @combinations bigint = dbo.Factorial(@n) / (dbo.Factorial(@k) * dbo.Factorial(@n - @k));
SELECT CAST(@combinations as varchar(max)) + ' combinations', MaxNumUsedFromNumbersTable = POWER(2, @n);

Peter showed that this "vertical cross join" doesn't perform as well as simply writing dynamic SQL to actually do the CROSS JOINs it avoids. At the trivial cost of a few more reads, his solution has metrics between 10 and 17 times better. The performance of his query decreases faster than mine as the amount of work increases, but not fast enough to stop anyone from using it.

The second set of numbers below is the factor as divided by the first row in the table, just to show how it scales.

Erik

Items  CPU   Writes  Reads  Duration |  CPU  Writes  Reads Duration
----- ------ ------ ------- -------- | ----- ------ ------ --------
17•5    7344     0     3861    8531  |
18•9   17141     0     7748   18536  |   2.3          2.0      2.2
20•10  76657     0    34078   84614  |  10.4          8.8      9.9
21•11 163859     0    73426  176969  |  22.3         19.0     20.7
21•20 142172     0    71198  154441  |  19.4         18.4     18.1

Peter

Items  CPU   Writes  Reads  Duration |  CPU  Writes  Reads Duration
----- ------ ------ ------- -------- | ----- ------ ------ --------
17•5     422    70    10263     794  | 
18•9    6046   980   219180   11148  |  14.3   14.0   21.4    14.0
20•10  24422  4126   901172   46106  |  57.9   58.9   87.8    58.1
21•11  58266  8560  2295116  104210  | 138.1  122.3  223.6   131.3
21•20  51391     5  6291273   55169  | 121.8    0.1  613.0    69.5

Extrapolating, eventually my query will be cheaper (though it is from the start in reads), but not for a long time. To use 21 items in the set already requires a numbers table going up to 2097152...

Here is a comment I originally made before realizing that my solution would perform drastically better with an on-the-fly numbers table:

I love single-query solutions to problems like this, but if you're looking for the best performance, an actual cross-join is best, unless you start dealing with seriously huge numbers of combination. But what does anyone want with hundreds of thousands or even millions of rows? Even the growing number of reads don't seem too much of a problem, though 6 million is a lot and it's getting bigger fast...

Anyway. Dynamic SQL wins. I still had a beautiful query. :)

Performance Results with an On-The-Fly Numbers Table

When I originally wrote this answer, I said:

Note that you could use an on-the-fly numbers table, but I haven't tried it.

Well, I tried it, and the results were that it performed much better! Here is the query I used:

DECLARE @N int = 16, @K int = 12;

CREATE TABLE #Set (Value char(1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED);
CREATE TABLE #Items (Num int);
INSERT #Items VALUES (@K);
INSERT #Set 
SELECT TOP (@N) V
FROM
   (VALUES ('A'),('B'),('C'),('D'),('E'),('F'),('G'),('H'),('I'),('J'),('K'),('L'),('M'),('N'),('O'),('P'),('Q'),('R'),('S'),('T'),('U'),('V'),('W'),('X'),('Y'),('Z')) X (V);
GO
DECLARE
   @N int = (SELECT Count(*) FROM #Set),
   @K int = (SELECT TOP 1 Num FROM #Items);

DECLARE @combination int, @value char(1);
WITH L0 AS (SELECT 1 N UNION ALL SELECT 1),
L1 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L0, L0 B),
L2 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L1, L1 B),
L3 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L2, L2 B),
L4 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L3, L3 B),
L5 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L4, L4 B),
Nums AS (SELECT Row_Number() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT 1)) Num FROM L5),
Nums1 AS (
   SELECT Num, P1 = (Num & 0x55555555) + ((Num / 2) & 0x55555555)
   FROM Nums
   WHERE Num BETWEEN 0 AND Power(2, @N) - 1
), Nums2 AS (
   SELECT Num, P2 = (P1 & 0x33333333) + ((P1 / 4) & 0x33333333)
   FROM Nums1
), Nums3 AS (
   SELECT Num, P3 = (P2 & 0x0F0F0F0F) + ((P2 / 16) & 0x0F0F0F0F)
   FROM Nums2
), BaseSet AS (
   SELECT Ind = Power(2, Row_Number() OVER (ORDER BY Value) - 1), *
   FROM #Set
)
SELECT
   @Combination = N.Num,
   @Value = S.Value
FROM
   Nums3 N
   INNER JOIN BaseSet S
      ON N.Num & S.Ind <> 0
WHERE P3 % 255 = @K;

Note that I selected the values into variables to reduce the time and memory needed to test everything. The server still does all the same work. I modified Peter's version to be similar, and removed unnecessary extras so they were both as lean as possible. The server version used for these tests is Microsoft SQL Server 2008 (RTM) - 10.0.1600.22 (Intel X86) Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.2 <X86> (Build 3790: Service Pack 2) (VM) running on a VM.

Below are charts showing the performance curves for values of N and K up to 21. The base data for them is in another answer on this page. The values are the result of 5 runs of each query at each K and N value, followed by throwing out the best and worst values for each metric and averaging the remaining 3.

Basically, my version has a "shoulder" (in the leftmost corner of the chart) at high values of N and low values of K that make it perform worse there than the dynamic SQL version. However, this stays fairly low and constant, and the central peak around N = 21 and K = 11 is much lower for Duration, CPU, and Reads than the dynamic SQL version.

I included a chart of the number of rows each item is expected to return so you can see how the query performs stacked up against how big a job it has to do.

Duration Chart CPU Chart Reads Chart Row Counts Chart

Please see my additional answer on this page for the complete performance results. I hit the post character limit and could not include it here. (Any ideas where else to put it?) To put things in perspective against my first version's performance results, here's the same format as before:

Erik

Items  CPU  Duration  Reads  Writes |  CPU  Duration  Reads 
----- ----- -------- ------- ------ | ----- -------- -------
17•5    354      378   12382      0 |
18•9   1849     1893   97246      0 |   5.2      5.0     7.9
20•10  7119     7357  369518      0 |  20.1     19.5    29.8
21•11 13531    13807  705438      0 |  38.2     36.5    57.0
21•20  3234     3295     48       0 |   9.1      8.7     0.0

Peter

Items  CPU  Duration  Reads  Writes |  CPU  Duration  Reads 
----- ----- -------- ------- ------ | ----- -------- -------
17•5     41       45    6433      0 | 
18•9   2051     1522  214021      0 |  50.0     33.8    33.3
20•10  8271     6685  864455      0 | 201.7    148.6   134.4
21•11 18823    15502 2097909      0 | 459.1    344.5   326.1
21•20 25688    17653 4195863      0 | 626.5    392.3   652.2

Conclusions

  • On-the-fly numbers tables are better than a real table containing rows, since reading one at huge rowcounts requires a lot of I/O. It is better to use a little CPU.
  • My initial tests weren't broad enough to really show the performance characteristics of the two versions.
  • Peter's version could be improved by making each JOIN not only be greater than the prior item, but also restrict the maximum value based on how many more items have to be fit into the set. For example, at 21 items taken 21 at a time, there is only one answer of 21 rows (all 21 items, one time), but the intermediate rowsets in the dynamic SQL version, early in the execution plan, contain combinations such as "AU" at step 2 even though this will be discarded at the next join since there is no value higher than "U" available. Similarly, an intermediate rowset at step 5 will contain "ARSTU" but the only valid combo at this point is "ABCDE". This improved version would not have a lower peak at the center, so possibly not improving it enough to become the clear winner, but it would at least become symmetrical so that the charts would not stay maxed past the middle of the region but would fall back to near 0 as my version does (see the top corner of the peaks for each query).

Duration Analysis

  • There is no really significant difference between the versions in duration (>100ms) until 14 items taken 12 at a time. Up to this point, my version wins 30 times and the dynamic SQL version wins 43 times.
  • Starting at 14•12, my version was faster 65 times (59 >100ms), the dynamic SQL version 64 times (60 >100ms). However, all the times my version was faster, it saved a total averaged duration of 256.5 seconds, and when the dynamic SQL version was faster, it saved 80.2 seconds.
  • The total averaged duration for all trials was Erik 270.3 seconds, Peter 446.2 seconds.
  • If a lookup table were created to determine which version to use (picking the faster one for the inputs), all the results could be performed in 188.7 seconds. Using the slowest one each time would take 527.7 seconds.

Reads Analysis

The duration analysis showed my query winning by significant but not overly large amount. When the metric is switched to reads, a very different picture emerges--my query uses on average 1/10th the reads.

  • There is no really significant difference between the versions in reads (>1000) until 9 items taken 9 at a time. Up to this point, my version wins 30 times and the dynamic SQL version wins 17 times.
  • Starting at 9•9, my version used fewer reads 118 times (113 >1000), the dynamic SQL version 69 times (31 >1000). However, all the times my version used fewer reads, it saved a total averaged 75.9M reads, and when the dynamic SQL version was faster, it saved 380K reads.
  • The total averaged reads for all trials was Erik 8.4M, Peter 84M.
  • If a lookup table were created to determine which version to use (picking the best one for the inputs), all the results could be performed in 8M reads. Using the worst one each time would take 84.3M reads.

I would be very interested to see the results of an updated dynamic SQL version that puts the extra upper limit on the items chosen at each step as I described above.

Addendum

The following version of my query achieves an improvement of about 2.25% over the performance results listed above. I used MIT's HAKMEM bit-counting method, and added a Convert(int) on the result of row_number() since it returns a bigint. Of course I wish this is the version I had used with for all the performance testing and charts and data above, but it is unlikely I will ever redo it as it was labor-intensive.

WITH L0 AS (SELECT 1 N UNION ALL SELECT 1),
L1 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L0, L0 B),
L2 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L1, L1 B),
L3 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L2, L2 B),
L4 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L3, L3 B),
L5 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L4, L4 B),
Nums AS (SELECT Row_Number() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT 1)) Num FROM L5),
Nums1 AS (
   SELECT Convert(int, Num) Num
   FROM Nums
   WHERE Num BETWEEN 1 AND Power(2, @N) - 1
), Nums2 AS (
   SELECT
      Num,
      P1 = Num - ((Num / 2) & 0xDB6DB6DB) - ((Num / 4) & 0x49249249)
   FROM Nums1
),
Nums3 AS (SELECT Num, Bits = ((P1 + P1 / 8) & 0xC71C71C7) % 63 FROM Nums2),
BaseSet AS (SELECT Ind = Power(2, Row_Number() OVER (ORDER BY Value) - 1), * FROM #Set)
SELECT
   N.Num,
   S.Value
FROM
   Nums3 N
   INNER JOIN BaseSet S
      ON N.Num & S.Ind <> 0
WHERE
   Bits = @K

And I could not resist showing one more version that does a lookup to get the count of bits. It may even be faster than other versions:

DECLARE @BitCounts binary(255) = 
   0x01010201020203010202030203030401020203020303040203030403040405
   + 0x0102020302030304020303040304040502030304030404050304040504050506
   + 0x0102020302030304020303040304040502030304030404050304040504050506
   + 0x0203030403040405030404050405050603040405040505060405050605060607
   + 0x0102020302030304020303040304040502030304030404050304040504050506
   + 0x0203030403040405030404050405050603040405040505060405050605060607
   + 0x0203030403040405030404050405050603040405040505060405050605060607
   + 0x0304040504050506040505060506060704050506050606070506060706070708;
WITH L0 AS (SELECT 1 N UNION ALL SELECT 1),
L1 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L0, L0 B),
L2 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L1, L1 B),
L3 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L2, L2 B),
L4 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L3, L3 B),
L5 AS (SELECT 1 N FROM L4, L4 B),
Nums AS (SELECT Row_Number() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT 1)) Num FROM L5),
Nums1 AS (SELECT Convert(int, Num) Num FROM Nums WHERE Num BETWEEN 1 AND Power(2, @N) - 1),
BaseSet AS (SELECT Ind = Power(2, Row_Number() OVER (ORDER BY Value) - 1), * FROM ComboSet)
SELECT
   @Combination = N.Num,
   @Value = S.Value
FROM
   Nums1 N
   INNER JOIN BaseSet S
      ON N.Num & S.Ind <> 0
WHERE
   @K =
      Convert(int, Substring(@BitCounts, N.Num & 0xFF, 1))
      + Convert(int, Substring(@BitCounts, N.Num / 256 & 0xFF, 1))
      + Convert(int, Substring(@BitCounts, N.Num / 65536 & 0xFF, 1))
      + Convert(int, Substring(@BitCounts, N.Num / 16777216, 1))
share|improve this answer
6  
Wow, just wow! :) –  Denis Valeev Sep 13 '10 at 21:00
1  
correct...clear...concise...oh my! clearly, my bit-twiddling abilities are not up to snuff. But a serious question, as I try to understand how this works, and hopefully apply it to other scenarios: what's the upper limit on @k and @n? –  Peter Radocchia Sep 13 '10 at 22:07
1  
@Peter This decimal version works the same way: select 004008005009 % 999 = 26, which is 4 + 8 + 5 + 9. And select 123 % 9 = 6 which is 1 + 2 + 3. It only works if the added value is guaranteed to not exceed the modulus, like select 234 % 9 = 0, the wrong answer. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 22:54
1  
You can, now! Although I think it's the other way around, changing an arbitrary number of joins to a single join. –  ErikE Sep 14 '10 at 0:20
3  
Good heavens, this is the most thorough answer I have ever seen on SO. +1<<0x3f –  eggyal Jan 24 '13 at 0:01

Please forgive this extra answer. I ran into the post character limit in my original answer.

Here are the complete averaged numeric performance results for the charts in my answer.

      |             Erik             |             Peter
 N  K |  CPU  Duration Reads  Writes |  CPU  Duration  Reads  Writes
-- -- - ----- -------- ------ ------ - ----- -------- ------- ------
 1  1 |     0        0      7      0 |     0        0       7      0
 2  1 |     0        0     10      0 |     0        0       7      0
 2  2 |     0        0      7      0 |     0        0      11      0
 3  1 |     0        0     12      0 |     0        0       7      0
 3  2 |     0        0     12      0 |     0        0      13      0
 3  3 |     5        0      7      0 |     0        0      19      0
 4  1 |     0        0     14      0 |     0        0       7      0
 4  2 |     0        0     18      0 |     0        0      15      0
 4  3 |     0        0     14      0 |     5        0      27      0
 4  4 |     0        0      7      0 |     0        0      35      0
 5  1 |     5        0     16      0 |     5        0       7      0
 5  2 |     0        0     26      0 |     0        0      17      0
 5  3 |     0        0     26      0 |     0        0      37      0
 5  4 |     0        0     16      0 |     0        0      57      0
 5  5 |     0        0      7      0 |     0        0      67      0
 6  1 |     0        0     18      0 |     0        0       7      0
 6  2 |     5        0     36      0 |     0        0      19      0
 6  3 |     0        0     46      0 |     0        0      49      0
 6  4 |     0        0     36      0 |     0        0      89      0
 6  5 |     5        0     18      0 |     5        0     119      0
 6  6 |     0        0      7      0 |     0        0     131      0
 7  1 |     5        0     20      0 |     0        0       7      0
 7  2 |     0        0     48      0 |     0        0      21      0
 7  3 |     0        0     76      0 |     0        0      63      0
 7  4 |     0        0     76      0 |     0        0     133      0
 7  5 |     0        1     48      0 |     0        1     203      0
 7  6 |     5        0     20      0 |     0        1     245      0
 7  7 |     5        0      7      0 |     0        3     259      0
 8  1 |     5        2     22      0 |     0        4       7      0
 8  2 |     0        1     62      0 |     0        0      23      0
 8  3 |     0        1    118      0 |     0        0      79      0
 8  4 |     0        1    146      0 |     0        1     191      0
 8  5 |     5        3    118      0 |     0        1     331      0
 8  6 |     5        1     62      0 |     5        2     443      0
 8  7 |     0        0     22      0 |     5        3     499      0
 8  8 |     0        0      7      0 |     5        3     515      0
 9  1 |     0        2     24      0 |     0        0       7      0
 9  2 |     5        3     78      0 |     0        0      25      0
 9  3 |     5        3    174      0 |     0        1      97      0
 9  4 |     5        5    258      0 |     0        2     265      0
 9  5 |     5        7    258      0 |    10        4     517      0
 9  6 |     5        5    174      0 |     5        5     769      0
 9  7 |     0        3     78      0 |    10        4     937      0
 9  8 |     0        0     24      0 |     0        3    1009      0
 9  9 |     0        1      7      0 |     0        4    1027      0
10  1 |    10        4     26      0 |     0        0       7      0
10  2 |     5        5     96      0 |     0        0      27      0
10  3 |     5        2    246      0 |     0        0     117      0
10  4 |    10       10    426      0 |    10        4     357      0
10  5 |    15       12    510      0 |     5        8     777      0
10  6 |    15       16    426      0 |    10        9    1281      0
10  7 |    10        4    246      0 |    10        9    1701      0
10  8 |    10        5     96      0 |    10        5    1941      0
10  9 |     5        4     26      0 |    10        7    2031      0
10 10 |     5        0      7      0 |    10        7    2051      0
11  1 |    10        8     28      0 |     0        0       7      0
11  2 |    15       11    116      0 |     0        0      29      0
11  3 |    21       24    336      0 |    10        3     139      0
11  4 |    21       18    666      0 |     5        2     469      0
11  5 |    21       20    930      0 |     5        3    1129      0
11  6 |    26       35    930      0 |    15       12    2053      0
11  7 |    20       14    666      0 |     5       25    2977      0
11  8 |    15        9    336      0 |    20       14    3637      0
11  9 |    10        7    116      0 |    21       27    3967      0
11 10 |    10        8     28      0 |    36       34    4086      0
11 11 |     5        8      7      0 |    15       15    4109      0
12  1 |    16       18     30      0 |     5        0       7      0
12  2 |    31       32    138      0 |     0        0      31      0
12  3 |    31       26    446      0 |    10        2     163      0
12  4 |    47       40    996      0 |    10        7     603      0
12  5 |    47       46   1590      0 |    21       17    1593      0
12  6 |    57       53   1854      0 |    31       30    3177      0
12  7 |    41       39   1590      0 |    31       30    5025      0
12  8 |    41       42    996      0 |    42       43    6609      0
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12 10 |    20       19    138      0 |    57       62    8048      0
12 11 |    15       17     30      0 |    72       64    8181      0
12 12 |    15       10      7      0 |    67       38    8217      0
13  1 |    31       32     32      0 |     0        0       7      0
13  2 |    21       25    162      0 |     0        0      33      0
13  3 |    36       34    578      0 |     5        2     189      0
13  4 |    57       65   1436      0 |    10        5     761      0
13  5 |    41       40   2580      0 |    10       10    2191      0
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13  7 |    62       62   3438      0 |    57       53    8251      0
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13 12 |    21       22     32      0 |   156       96   16383      0
13 13 |    26       30      7      0 |   166       98   16411      0
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14  2 |    52       50    188      0 |     0        0      35      0
14  3 |    57       60    734      0 |    10        4     217      0
14  4 |    78       76   2008      0 |    15        8     945      0
14  5 |    99       97   4010      0 |    36       34    2947      0
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14 10 |    94       92   2008      0 |   229      133   30169      0
14 11 |    83       90    734      0 |   239      136   32237      0
14 12 |    47       46    188      0 |   281      176   33031      0
14 13 |    52       53     34      0 |   260      167   32767      0
14 14 |    46       47      7      0 |   203      149   32797      0
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15  3 |   104       98    916      0 |     0        2     247      0
15  4 |   135      135   2736      0 |    15       17    1157      0
15  5 |    94       97   6012      0 |    26       27    3887      0
15  6 |   192      188  10016      0 |    57       53    9893      0
15  7 |   187      192  12876      0 |    73       73   19903      0
15  8 |   286      296  12876      0 |   338      230   33123      0
15  9 |   208      207  10016      0 |   354      223   46063      0
15 10 |   140      143   6012      0 |   443      334   56143      0
15 11 |    88       86   2736      0 |   391      273   62219      0
15 12 |    73       72    916      0 |   432      269   65019      0
15 13 |   109      117    216      0 |   317      210   65999      0
15 14 |   156      187     36      0 |   411      277   66279      0
15 15 |   140      142      7      0 |   354      209   65567      0
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16  3 |   208      206   1126      0 |    10        4     279      0
16  4 |   187      189   3646      0 |    15       13    1399      0
16  5 |   234      234   8742      0 |    42       42    5039      0
16  6 |   333      337  16022      0 |    83       85   13775      0
16  7 |   672      742  22886      0 |   395      235   30087      0
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16 13 |   119      119   1126      0 |   770      506  130423      0
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17  3 |   281      290   1366      0 |     0        3     313      0
17  4 |   307      317   4766      0 |    31       28    1673      0
17  5 |   354      378  12382      0 |    41       45    6433      0
17  6 |   583      582  24758      0 |   130      127   18809      0
17  7 |   839      859  38902      0 |   693      449   43873      0
17  8 |  1177     1183  48626      0 |   916      679   82847      0
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19  6 |  1395     1462  54270      0 |   453      387   33591      0
19  7 |  1875     1929 100782      0 |  1197      838   87941      0
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20  5 |  2104     2161  31014      0 |    88       85   12397      0
20  6 |  2880     2958  77526      0 |   860      554   43675      0
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21  4 |  3687     3734  11976      0 |    21       25    3129      0
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21  6 |  4859     4943 108534      0 |   963      661   56079      0
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21 12 | 12244    12400 587866      0 | 21834    18760 2803435      0
21 13 |  9406     9528 406986      0 | 23771    21274 3391389      0
21 14 |  7114     7180 232566      0 | 26677    24296 3798463      0
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21 19 |  3640     3768    426      0 | 26186    17891 4195349      0
21 20 |  3234     3295     48      0 | 25688    17653 4195863      0
21 21 |  3156     3219      7      0 | 26140    17838 4195999      0
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for providing the most thorough and complete answer I've ever received... ever. –  Dave Aug 17 '12 at 14:17
    
You're welcome! It was fun. –  ErikE Aug 17 '12 at 14:33

How about some dynamic SQL?

DECLARE @k int = 5, @n INT

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#set') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #set
CREATE TABLE #set ( [value] varchar(24) )
INSERT #set VALUES ('1'),('2'),('3'),('4'),('5'),('6')
SET @n = @@ROWCOUNT

SELECT dbo.Factorial(@n) / (dbo.Factorial(@k) * dbo.Factorial(@n - @k)) AS [expected combinations]

-- let's generate some sql.
DECLARE 
  @crlf     NCHAR(2) = NCHAR(13)+NCHAR(10)
, @sql      NVARCHAR(MAX)
, @select   NVARCHAR(MAX)
, @from     NVARCHAR(MAX)
, @order    NVARCHAR(MAX)
, @in       NVARCHAR(MAX)

DECLARE @j INT = 0
WHILE @j < @k BEGIN 
  SET @j += 1
  IF @j = 1 BEGIN
    SET @select = 'SELECT'+@crlf+'  _1.value AS [1]'
    SET @from   = @crlf+'FROM #set AS _1'
    SET @order  = 'ORDER BY _1.value'
    SET @in     = '[1]'
  END 
  ELSE BEGIN
    SET @select += @crlf+', _'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j)+'.value AS ['+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j)+']'
    SET @from   += @crlf+'INNER JOIN #set AS _'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j)+' ON _'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j)+'.value > _'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j-1)+'.value'
    SET @order  += ', _'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j)+'.value' 
    SET @in     += ', ['+CONVERT(VARCHAR,@j)+']'
  END
END
SET @select += @crlf+', ROW_NUMBER() OVER ('+@order+') AS combination'
SET @sql = @select + @from

-- let's see how it looks
PRINT @sql
EXEC (@sql)

-- ok, now dump pivot and dump into a table for later use
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#combinations') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #combinations
CREATE TABLE #combinations (
  combination INT
, value VARCHAR(24)
, PRIMARY KEY (combination, value)
)

SET @sql 
= 'WITH CTE AS ('+@crlf+@sql+@crlf+')'+@crlf
+ 'INSERT #combinations (combination, value)'+@crlf
+ 'SELECT combination, value FROM CTE a'+@crlf
+ 'UNPIVOT (value FOR position IN ('+@in+')) AS b'

PRINT @sql
EXEC (@sql)

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT combination) AS [returned combinations] FROM #combinations
SELECT * FROM #combinations

Generates the following query for @k = 5:

SELECT
  _1.value AS [1]
, _2.value AS [2]
, _3.value AS [3]
, _4.value AS [4]
, _5.value AS [5]
, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY _1.value, _2.value, _3.value, _4.value, _5.value) AS combination
FROM #set AS _1
INNER JOIN #set AS _2 ON _2.value > _1.value
INNER JOIN #set AS _3 ON _3.value > _2.value
INNER JOIN #set AS _4 ON _4.value > _3.value
INNER JOIN #set AS _5 ON _5.value > _4.value

Which it then unpivots and dumps into a table.

The dynamic SQL is ugly, and you can't wrap it in a UDF, but the query produced is very efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to wrap into a UDF however this could come in handy though sometime. Thanks! –  Dave Sep 13 '10 at 21:42
    
Put it in an SP and you can INSERT ... EXEC it. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 22:45
    
Do you need #set? Can't you just generate a CTE for it? –  Gabe Sep 13 '10 at 22:53
    
@Gabe I think the point is that the #set table holds arbitrary things... not just numbers but perhaps people names or ingredients or any other thing that someone might want to display combinations of. –  ErikE Sep 14 '10 at 0:22

I ran across another technique for calculating combinations, and it is so simple. In a public SQL challenge, it also soundly beat my own attempt based on the same bit-pattern technique as in my (currently) accepted answer. Though I admit I didn't play with it super long, or grab my best solution from here and adapt, but I wrote it over again.

Anyway, I was sure I had taken myself down a peg--here I was thinking I'd hit on something very cool but later found out my solution was easily surpassed. But to my surprise, when I tried the technique out, it was worse than the best method above. It is here for reference due to its easiness to implement and its reasonable performance for small jobs (thus making it superior except when the job may demand the added complexity of something like the bit-pattern technique).

Given a table #Set with the same number of rows as the items being selected from, and variable @K for the number of items taken at a time, here is that method:

WITH Chains AS (
   SELECT
      Generation = 1,
      Chain = Convert(varchar(1000),'|' + Value + '|'),
      Value
   FROM
      #Set
   WHERE
      @K > 0
      AND value <= ALL (
         SELECT TOP (@K) Value
         FROM #Set
         ORDER BY Value DESC
      )
   UNION ALL
   SELECT
      C.Generation + 1,
      Convert(varchar(1000), C.Chain + S.Value + '|'),
      S.Value
   FROM
      Chains C
      INNER JOIN #Set S
         ON C.Value < S.Value
   WHERE
      C.Generation <= @K
)
SELECT
   C.Chain,
   S.Value
FROM
   Chains C
   INNER JOIN #Set S
      ON C.Chain LIKE '%|' + S.Value + '|%'
WHERE
   Generation = @K;
share|improve this answer

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