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This might be a weird question, but I've been unable to find an answer. Assuming I were to use an Object tag to embed an HTML snippet from an outside source (different server), how does Googles spider view that data? Does it pull in the data source like a browser would or does it only view the alternate content found between the Object tags like an old browser would do?

Example:

<object data="http://www.remotehost.com/data/test.html" type="text/html" width="300" height="200">
  alt : <a href="http://www.remotehost.com/data/test.html">test.html</a>
</object>

Does only the "Alt : test.html" get read, or does the source "data/test.html" also get indexed as if it were part of the page?

I basically have an HTML content that customers need to include in their pages without having to do it dynamically using whatever back-end they use to prepare their page (PHP, JSP or whatever). They need the simplest method that doesn't require much back-end work on their part. I'm curious if this method would allow them to have that content included in their search results (their site) and not be indexed as my content from my server (index as content for my domain).

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using Google's Developer Toolbox, and Fetch as Googlebot, I was able to see how the Google spider would interpret the page and it doesn't process the Object data at all. Too bad, I guess I'll have to find another solution.

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It seems to me Google had started crawling for things in Object tag since May 2013 and this had caused massive trouble with us.

For example, consider the following Flash embed code:

<object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" 
              codebase="http://fpdownload.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=9,0,115,0" 
              width="464" height="419" align="middle">
        <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" />
        <param name="movie" value="http://www.example.com/user-guide/loader.swf" />
        <param name="base" value="http://www.example.com/user-guide/" />
        <param name="flashvars" value="datasource=data.xml" />
        <param name="loop" value="false" />
        <param name="menu" value="true" />
        <param name="quality" value="best" />
        <param name="wmode" value="transparent" />
        <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" />
        <embed src="http://www.example.com/user-guide/loader.swf" base="http://www.example.com/user-guide/" 
               flashvars="datasource=data.xml" 
               loop="false" menu="true" quality="best" wmode="transparent" 
               bgcolor="#ffffff" width="464" height="419" align="middle" 
               allowScriptAccess="always" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" 
               pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"></embed>
</object>

What I found is Google now starts to crawl the http://www.example.com/user-guide/ folder which supposed to be a directory path, result in massive 403 forbidden error!

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Google has crawled, recognized and indexed object tags since July-2011. Anything that meets Schema.org standards has the potential to be interpreted and even included in search results where applicable.

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