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I'm developing an Android application and I would really like to deploy it for the iPhone as well.

However, I do not know Objective-C and I think it would take an annoyingly long time to figure that and the Apple framework out.

Is there a recommended way to port an Android application to iOS? Would the best bet be to hire a freelancer?

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In short, yes that would be your best bet, although it's worth to check out options like MonoTouch and Corona. If your planning to port many apps, use one of those or learn ObjC. If you want to make a trial with one app, hire someone, perhaps on a profit-share basis if you don't have a lot of dough to shell out. –  Felixyz Sep 10 '10 at 16:41
    
My understanding is that Apple requires you to use their toolset. No translation tools are allowed. (Until recently, you weren't even allowed to port an application that had been developed on another platform.) –  ThatBlairGuy Sep 10 '10 at 16:49
    
A quick google search leads me to think that Corona would be good if I'm developing an application from scratch. However, in my case, the application is pretty much already completely built for Android in Java. –  Fran Fitzpatrick Sep 10 '10 at 16:52
    
Just found a link about iSpectrum. Would this be more of what I'm looking for? flexycore.com/ispectrum-overview.html –  Fran Fitzpatrick Sep 10 '10 at 16:53
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@Lucas: Yes, even before Apple didn't reinforce that rule vigorously except for apps made with Flash, and now they've dropped the (ludicrous) requirement. @Fran If your a Java developer MonoTouch will probably be the most comfortable way to go. You'll use a language that's close to Java, but you will still have to learn the UIKit framework. And it's not free. So again, best bet is to strike a deal with an iPhone developer. –  Felixyz Sep 10 '10 at 17:08
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closed as not constructive by Will Jan 29 '13 at 21:13

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3 Answers

On the run now (home time ;-) ), so my answer will be concise (sorry)

Take a look at/Google (in no particular order):

MoSync <- Compiles C++ native apps to several mobile platforms, including Android and IOS, GPL for non-commercial projects.

AirplaySDK: Similar to MoSync, mainly commercial, has some free licensing for one of the 2 environments you're after (believe that's IOS, please verify yourself). Has been used comercially by Konami, Activision etc.

OpenFrameworks (OF) - Collections of C++ 'wrapper' code which enables unified cross-platform development of Audio/Visual projects (could be used for Games etc). The Android port is beta, see Android/Eclipse/OF Installation and the Android port's GitHub repository/developer (branch 0062_Android). The iPhone-specific code is quite complete (accelerometer access, etc. etc.).

XMLVM - It allows some level of porting from Java to a native IOS executable. Not sure how far forward this project is, and you might need to implement some of their framework classes (relatively trivial if you've got good separation of your existing Java libs).

Personally, I'm looking at OpenFrameworks right now, mainly as I like the 'One API' concept and I'm avoiding Objective-C for the moment (Want to ease myself in, I'm a Java/C# dev).

Cheers

Rich

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Right now I've only seen MonoTouch available for cross platform development, which allows you to develop in .NET targetting the iPhone.

I have not seen a similar product for Android, but would a .NET based conversion process be feasible? The pricing is not outrageous.

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A similar product MonoDroid is coming soon to Android. monodroid.net –  Ryan Berger Sep 10 '10 at 16:49
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Your best bet for X-plat is HTML 5.

You will not be able to automagically port your native code because Android and iPhone use completely different patterns for developing all aspects of "the app".

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