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I wrote my first ever C++ template code on expandable array and I am getting a segmentation fault! After an hour of debugging I have realized that I need help. Something is wrong with the constructor or the destructor I think but not sure.

The code is on pastie ready to be compiled. http://pastie.org/1150617

/* Expandable array in C++ */

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class EArray{
private:
    T* arr;
    int size;
public:
    EArray(int l);
    ~EArray();

    void setElement(int i, const T& newval);
    void eraseElement(int i);
    void addElement(int i, const T& newval);
    void push(const T& newval);
    void display();
};

template <class T>
EArray<T>::EArray(int l){
    size = l;
}

template <class T>
EArray<T>::~EArray(){
    delete [] arr;
    arr = NULL;
}

template <class T>
void EArray<T>::setElement(int i, const T& newval){
    if(i < size && i >= 0){
        arr[i] = newval;
    }
}

template <class T>
void EArray<T>::eraseElement(int index){
    size -= 1;
    T* newarr = new T[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size+1; i++){
        if (i < index){
            newarr[i] = arr[i];
        }
        else if(i > index){
            newarr[i-1] = arr[i];
        }
    }
    delete [] arr;
    arr = newarr;
}

template <class T>
void EArray<T>::addElement(int index, const T& newval){
    size += 1;
    T* newarr = new T[size];
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
        if(i<index){
            newarr[i] = arr[i];
        }
        else if (i == index){
            newarr[i] = newval;
        }
        else{
            newarr[i] = arr[i-1];
        }
    }
    delete [] arr;
    arr = newarr;
}

template <class T>

void EArray<T>::push(const T& newval){
    size += 1;
    T * newarr = new T[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size-1; i++){
        newarr[i] = arr[i];
    }
    newarr[size-1]=newval;
    delete [] arr;
    arr = newarr;
}

template <class T>
void EArray<T>::display(){
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
        cout << arr[i] << endl;
    }
}

int main(){
    EArray<int> A(6);
    A.setElement(0,34);
    A.setElement(1,544);
    A.setElement(2,32);
    A.setElement(3,324);
    A.setElement(4,24);
    A.display();
    A.addElement(3,12);
    A.display();
    A.eraseElement(4);
    A.display();
    A.push(32456);
    A.display();
}
share|improve this question
6  
Where do you get a segmentation fault? Have you attached a debugger to your program to see what is wrong when it crashes? Have you reduced the code to the minimum required to reproduce the problem? –  James McNellis Sep 10 '10 at 18:04
    
James' questions are ones that should always be answered whenever trying to analyze a segfault. +1. –  CanSpice Sep 10 '10 at 18:07
    
I think I have to learn using a debugger. –  zm1 Sep 10 '10 at 18:26
    
Yes, you do, and as soon as possible. Good debugging skills are essential for a programmer to have. –  James McNellis Sep 10 '10 at 18:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It has nothing to do with templates. It's just a problem of memory management. In the constructor of EArray, you have never initialized arr, so by default it contains some invalid pointer.

But then in setElement, you used this invalid pointer arr[i] = newval;, which should cause a SegFault.

It should be fixable by adding

arr = new T[size];

in the constructor (result: before, with segfaultafter, running fine).

(BTW, in practice, please use a std::vector.)

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I wrote this just to understand the mechanics. I would use st::vector for usage. Thanks for the answer. –  zm1 Sep 10 '10 at 18:21

Your EArray constructor does not initialize arr

add arr = new T[size]; after line 24

Or change it to:

template <class T>
EArray<T>::EArray(int l) : size(l), arr(new T[size]){
    size = l;
}

You should provide a correct copy construtor and assignment operator as well - or make them private as to not allow your EArray to be copied around.

share|improve this answer

I'm still at it. But a first error is:

  • the constructor does not allocate, but only sets size
  • setElement does access the field while it is not allocated.

(that seems to be it)

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Your ctor does NOT allocate memory for the elements. And you are using setElement before pushing elements into the object. So, arr[i] in setElement will access unallocated memory, and AV.

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Well 1 thing to remember is that you specify there is a return of an int in your main function then don't return anything. This is wrong.

Your error, however, arises from the fact that you set the size of the array in the constructor but don't actually allocate the space for it. So when you try to set the first element it tries to set it to unallocated memory and thus you end up with a segfault.

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2  
Your first point is incorrect. main is allowed to have an implied return 0; tacked on at the end if you don't return anything. –  Dennis Zickefoose Sep 10 '10 at 18:46

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