Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The wikipedia article on JVM languages states:

Some of these languages are interpreted by a Java program, and some are compiled to Java bytecode...

Which well-known, general purpose JVM languages are interpreted by a Java program?

share|improve this question
4  
I don't think that statement is correct. A language with a Java interpreter is not a "JVM language", it's just an interpreted language. IMO a JVM language (which is in fact a misnomer, they'd be languages with a JVM implementation) is one that gets compiled to JVM bytecode –  cthom06 Sep 10 '10 at 18:10
    
@cthom06 - I think your answer is actually the correct one. Please consider adding an answer so I can accept it. –  rcampbell Sep 12 '10 at 13:08
    
oh come on. that's not fair. accepting on a technicality because of a slip up of term usage. just edit the question. you quite plainly just asked for a list. i noticed the funny term usage but ignored it and shot to the heart what you were seeking. –  Zac Bowling Sep 24 '10 at 16:28
    
@Zac - I still think cthom06's point is correct. The whole reason I asked the question is because the Wiki statement didn't sit right with me and wanted a second opinion. Your answer was helpful as well, however, so I upvoted it an encourage anyone reading this to do the same. –  rcampbell Sep 28 '10 at 8:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Reposted as answer:

I don't think that statement is correct. A language with a Java interpreter is not a "JVM language", it's just an interpreted language. IMO a JVM language (which is in fact a misnomer, they'd be languages with a JVM implementation) is one that gets compiled to JVM bytecode

share|improve this answer

Maybe the article is referring to languages like JRuby or Jython...

share|improve this answer
    
IINM, Jython does produce jvm bytecode (with an optional output of java source). It isn't really run over an interpreter written in Java (which is what I think the OP wants). –  MAK Sep 12 '10 at 19:14

Mozilla Rhino (the Java javascript engine) is interpreted.

JRuby, Jython, and Scala are examples that are mostly compiled to bytecode.

share|improve this answer

Well Groovy for one is not compiled.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.