Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen this before in code, but forgotten it. Basically it toggles a boolean variable. If it's true, it'll set to false and vice-versa. But unfortunately forgot the syntax.

It's basically a one liner for this:

if (myVar) {  
    myVar = false;  
} else {  
    myVar = true;  
}  

It's something like this, but don't know what it's called or the correct syntax of it:

myVar = myVar : false ? true;
share|improve this question
    
i assume that's a typo, the extra v? –  Aaron Anodide Sep 10 '10 at 18:46
1  
if you find one of the answers is what you were looking for, you may click on the "accept" check mark under the number. –  OscarRyz Sep 10 '10 at 18:54
add comment

13 Answers

up vote 65 down vote accepted

How about

myVar = !myVar

?

share|improve this answer
1  
this is simpler IMO –  Aaron Anodide Sep 10 '10 at 18:46
1  
Yeah, this is a good toggle -- although it really depends on what you are doing in your app whether you want to use a given syntax for something like this. You know -- how conceptually close it is to what you're actually doing. –  Joshua Evensen Sep 10 '10 at 18:52
2  
+0: Because this answer only offers an alternative, it doesn't answer the question at all. –  Guffa Sep 10 '10 at 19:34
4  
myVar = !!!myVar –  irreputable Sep 10 '10 at 20:10
8  
This is insanity, +40 for an answer that doesn't even mention the conditional operator half of the question? –  Michael Mrozek Sep 10 '10 at 21:04
show 3 more comments

myVar = myVar ? false : true; is using the conditional operator.

You can just do this though

myVar = !myVar;
share|improve this answer
2  
You have the : and ? backwards. It goes condition ? true branch : false branch. –  Tesserex Sep 10 '10 at 18:46
    
@Tesserex: fixed –  Jonathan Fingland Sep 10 '10 at 18:47
    
Also, this is frequently referred to as "the ternary operator" due to the fact that it is the only 3-arity operator in most programming languages. –  Ben Sep 11 '10 at 16:05
add comment

Another option is XOR:

myVar ^= true;

It's notable in that only the LHS of the assignment ever changes; the right side is constant and will toggle any boolean variable. Negation's more self-documenting IMO, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Given a variable name with length > 4, this will also be the shortest code you can find. –  Mark Peters Sep 10 '10 at 19:17
    
It is also faster than anything else (not that you should be worried about speed at this level). –  ILMTitan Sep 10 '10 at 20:04
    
you can make it even shorter: myVar ^= 1; –  Lie Ryan Sep 10 '10 at 21:50
3  
@Lie: The OP asked about Java. That's not valid for a Java boolean. –  Mark Peters Sep 10 '10 at 23:02
1  
myVar^=1>0; Given a variable name with length > 3, is this the shortest code you can find? –  Thomas Mueller Sep 11 '10 at 13:37
show 3 more comments

What you are thinking of is the conditional operator:

myVar = myVvar ? false : true;

(As you see, a lot of people call this "the ternary operator", but that only means that it is an operator with three operands. As it happens, there is only one operator with three operands in this language, but it still says nothing about what the operator does.)

It's of course easier to use the negation operator:

myVar = !myVar;
share|improve this answer
add comment

The smallest code I can think of at the moment. I don't know what its called (if it has a name, as you seem to suggest)

myVar = !myVar
share|improve this answer
1  
It is called a negation. There should be a list of arithmetic and logical operators in the manual somewhere. –  Alexander Rautenberg Sep 10 '10 at 18:47
1  
Unary negation? –  Mark Canlas Sep 10 '10 at 18:47
    
Are there any others? –  Alexander Rautenberg Sep 10 '10 at 18:50
    
The operation is negation operation of course but I naively thought the expression as a whole might have some other fancy name in popular lingo. –  Goutham Sep 10 '10 at 19:26
add comment

What you're talking about is the "ternary" or "conditional" operator, which does an inline substitution as per a condition.

The syntax is:

condition ? trueValue : falseValue

I usually throw parentheses around my condition, sometimes around the whole conditional operator. Depends on how much I'm trying to delineate it from everything else.

So for example, suppose you want to return the larger of two numbers:

public int max(int a, int b)
{
  return (a > b) ? a : b;
}

Notice that it can be substituted into the middle of something else.


Okay, now let's tackle your actual question about toggling a boolean type.

myVar = (myVar) ? false : true;

is how you would do it with the conditional operator. (Again, parentheses aren't required, I just favor them.)

But there's a simpler way to toggle the boolean... using the logical NOT ("!") operator:

myVar = !myVar;

Keep it simple. :-)

share|improve this answer
add comment
if(myVar == true)
{
    myVar = false;
}
else if (myVar == false)
{
    myVar = true;
}
else
{
    myVar = FILE_NOT_FOUND
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 and a groan for the typo (myVar vs MyVar) and for overly verbose, +1 for the humor at the end. Fix the typo and I might give you +1 (and a groan). :-) –  Platinum Azure Sep 10 '10 at 18:51
6  
No upvote from me because I don't want to confuse anyone seriously looking for this info, but you get my upvote in spirit. :) –  Jeff Sep 10 '10 at 18:56
2  
-1 for being intentionally misleading –  Erick Robertson Sep 10 '10 at 19:36
3  
3  
+1 for being intentionally misleading. –  Chris Lively Sep 10 '10 at 21:00
show 1 more comment

This also works :P

v=v?!v:!v;
share|improve this answer
    
Love this one!!! But to keep it in the Java spirit it should probably be v = (!v == false) ? !v : !v –  Alexander Rautenberg Sep 10 '10 at 18:59
    
Hahahahaha! That's brilliant. Too condensed for Java, though-- that could actually win a code golf! :-P –  Platinum Azure Sep 10 '10 at 19:17
1  
What about: v=!v?!v:!v; :) :) –  OscarRyz Sep 10 '10 at 19:27
2  
brilliant and for added unreadability call the variable i: i=!i?!i:!i;. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 11 '10 at 7:04
    
@Joachim, ehehh or it lowercase "L" l=!l?!l:!l; –  OscarRyz Sep 11 '10 at 15:46
add comment

There is a ternary operator (wikipedia). Which allows you to write a condensed if-else statement like in the second example.

In java:

myVar = (myVar) ? true : false;

There is also the NOT operator, which toggles a boolean variable. In java that is !. I believe that is what you want.

myVar = !myVar;
share|improve this answer
add comment
public boolean toggle(boolean bool)
{
  return !bool;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being a good sport and letting me edit. Sorry :-) –  Platinum Azure Sep 10 '10 at 19:07
1  
I won't downvote, but the idea of having a helper function for this makes me die a little inside. It would be like having a function public int plus(int a, int b) { return a + b };. Just adding redundancy. It might have merit if Java had pass-by-ref. –  Mark Peters Sep 11 '10 at 5:11
add comment

I recently (on my own) found a similar answer to one already stated here. However, the simplest and shortest (non-repeating variable name with least code) answer is:

formControl.disabled ^= 1;

This works best in JavaScript when wanting to toggle boolean, DOM-based attributes (for example, a form control/input's disabled property -- going from a non-editable to edit state). After much searching (with no result that I liked) and some trial and error, I found my solution to be the simplest (however, true instead of a 1 would be clearer -- as was previously posted).

Since this syntax isn't very clear, immediately, I would not advise using it very often (I believe it is appropriate when the variable or property makes the context obvious). I have posted this response (instead of making it a comment) because the context in which the XOR bitwise self-assignment should be used is very important. This "trick" should mostly be avoided when considering best practices.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As others have noted, there are two ways to negate something: "lvalue = !lvalue;" and "lvalue ^= 1;". It's important to recognize the differences.

Saying "lvalue = !lvalue" will cause lvalue to be set to 1 if it was zero, and 0 if it was set to anything else. The lvalue will be evaluated twice; this is not a factor for simple variables, but saying "someArray[index1][index2][index3][index4] = !someArray[index1][index2][index3][index4]" could slow things down.

Saying "lvalue ^= 1;" will cause lvalue to be set to 1 if it was 0, 0 if it was 1, and something else if it was neither zero nor 1. The lvalue need only be specified or evaluated once, and if the value is known to be either zero or 1, this form is likely to be faster.

Too bad there's no auto-negate operator; there are times such a thing would be handy.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a Java question. 1 won't work. –  EJP Sep 11 '10 at 7:59
add comment

You can also use the binary form of negation as shown here.

if ((v == true) && !(v = false)) {
    v != true;   /* negate with true if true. */
} else {
    v =! false;  /* negate with false if false. */
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wish I could downvote this multiple times. I can only think this wasn't posted in good faith, it's so wrong. I guess for starters I could say != is not an assignment operator, so v != true; won't change v. –  Mark Peters Sep 11 '10 at 5:14
    
Agreed. Is this a joke? –  EJP Sep 11 '10 at 7:59
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.